Treating People Like Things – From the Watson IoT Cognitive Building Forum

Treating People Like Things – From the Watson IoT Cognitive Building Forum


Guy Raz (Host): Every single one of us and all the devices that we carry are data points. Every time we click like on Facebook, every
time we do anything digitally it’s a fingerprint forever. And that’s a real thing, and we’re
going to in theory walk into these buildings and they will be able to collect all of this
information about us simply based on biometric data or the card we’re carrying in our shirt
pocket. What are the implications for that? First you Claire Claire Penny (IBM): It’s being collected today.
Ok, let’s be honest. It is in vast volumes, so it’s getting control of that and respecting the
privacy of people and giving people the ability to opt out if they don’t want to, so if they
don’t want, maybe it’s an app that you download for that pub and you get whatever benefit
you get, maybe you get vouchers or something, drink tokens, going forward. It’s the ability
to opt in and out I think that’s quite key. But let’s not kid ourselves, data is being
collected all day every day. Richard Harrison (Gensler): What we’re seeing
across the different building sectors whereas in a hotel it’s your choice to put your data
into your phone and buy into that experience effectively. Where we’re seeing pushback is
in the workplace sector. There’s a very mixed reaction between across the employees that
we’re experiencing. It’s very much divided under 25’s have a different attitude than
over 25’s. Under 25’s are much more used to it adoptive and I guess comfortable with it.
But I think there’s a lot of resistance still in the workplace, somehow your data being
collected could potentially be used against you, so it’s great that it can collectively
improve efficiency performance, etc. make your business more successful and in theory
as an employee you should be buying into that however are they going to be able to monitor
that you weren’t at your desk for 8 hours during the day. So I think there’s a growing resistance,
not a growing resistance, but still a significant resistance, Claire Penny (IBM): And I think that brings
in the case around what’s the value of this to the individual. If it’s valuable to the
individual then you’re going to get much more adoption of it, but where if like you were
saying, if they feel it’s just too intrusive then it’s going to Guy Raz (Host): It sounds great to go into
a hotel room, I would love to have photos of my kids on the wall in the hotel room,
but part of me is a little uncomfortable with the idea that data is also gathered and stored.
How do we make sure that data is protected in an age of data breeches and of enormous
government data breeches? How do we make sure that people’s information is safe? Richard Harrison (Gensler): That’s a good
one, and I’d be interested to know if there is a consistent platform developed yet against
which data security is monitored for example. Graca Carvalho (UCL): Unfortunately I don’t
think that there is a common platform for that yet and I think that one of the big
challenges that we are addressing at the Alan Turing is actually understanding the entire
business around data privacy and actually data ethics and we have been having conversations with
academics with industry with government and we have some initial document that prompt
where the challenges are and what possible solution can be but i think that we are still
far away from finding that common platform that can be adopted more broadly and i think
that we’re not there yet

Danny Hutson

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