The Chromebook Customer Adoption Journey (Cloud Next ’19)

The Chromebook Customer Adoption Journey (Cloud Next ’19)


[MUSIC PLAYING] DIANA CHONG: I’m guessing that
there are three types of people here. One, you’re an existing
Chrome customer here to kind of
just share the joys, the tribulations of going
on this Chrome journey. So we’re going to get a lot of
that here with our panelists today. I’m guessing a second group,
you’ve heard of Chrome. You’re starting to maybe
pilot or do a POC on it. And you just want to find out
more and see what that path looks like as we move ahead. And we’ll definitely get
some of that going, some of those questions answered. We’re going to have
a Dory open as well so you can ask questions
throughout the session as we progress. And then I’m guessing–
and you don’t need identify yourselves–
but there’s probably a third group of you
who’s just tired of going to a session that talks
about Kubernetes, containers, cloud machine learning,
AI, totally fine. We welcome you here today too
to take a break from the cloud talk as well. But hopefully you’ll leave from
this session having learned a bit about Chrome and what
it takes to deploy Chrome, and what it looks like
as we try to increase adoption of Chrome devices
and browser within our works. So I wanted to go ahead
and introduce myself. My name is Diana Chong. I run our customer success
team for Chrome Enterprise. And my team is
responsible for all of our post-sales
deployment activities for our Enterprise customers. We just try to make sure
that our customers have a very smooth process deploying
their Chromebooks or Chrome browser, and just making sure
that we have our customers go through it as
smoothly as possible and have a great experience. And so today, I have with
me three of our customers on stage. And I’m going to go ahead and
have them introduce themselves. But they’re going
to talk a little bit about what Chromebook
adoption looks like for them. So maybe Josh, and
then we’ll go this way. JOSHUA CHADD: Hi,
I’m Josh Chadd. I’m a systems engineer at
Starbucks Coffee Company. And currently we have
about 13,000 Chromebooks deployed in North
America– so both Canada and the United States in all
of our company-owned stores. DIANA CHONG: And Donna. DONNA CHORNAWKA:
I’m Donna Chornawka and I’m the managing director
of our team member collaboration enablement team
within ATB Financial. And so what my
group does is we’re about 50 team members
strong, and we provide end user
support on all devices as well as G Suite
and Google Admin. And so with that
we have about 700, 750 Pixelbooks within
our environment across our province in Alberta. JASON TAHANEY: Hi, everyone. My name is Jason Tahaney
and I’m the director of IT for Hunterdon Healthcare system. We’re a health care system
located in central New Jersey. We’ve been a Chrome customer
now for about two years. And we have a little over 200
devices out there in production currently, with plans to
do a lot more– in fact, we’re licensed for almost 1,000. And we’re going to be rolling
out a lot more later this year. DIANA CHONG: Cool. Well, welcome
everyone on the stage. And now we’re going to
dig a little bit deeper just so you guys have a better
understanding of where they’re at with their deployments. So maybe we’ll just
go down the row again. Talk a little bit about how
you’re using Chromebooks and where they’re
currently deployed today. JOSHUA CHADD: Yeah, so
as I mentioned before, we have at least one
Chromebook in every single one of our stores that
our company owns. And they’re used primarily
by all the partners– which is what we
call our employees– to access things like
scheduling software, our information portal, a
few other inventory tools, cash management, things that
are just basic operational tools that everyone within the
store has some need to access. DIANA CHONG: And Donna. DONNA CHORNAWKA: And
within ATB Financial we started our journey to using
Chrome as our key browser, as well as then
introducing Chromebooks into our environment as part
of our G Suite implementation. So as a company we
made the decision to move on to G Suite
in December of 2016. And then we deployed
the full suite into our entire
organization in July 2017. And so during that
journey we had seconded 50 people, which
I’ll talk about more, called G Evangelists. And at that time we introduced
the Chromebooks to them. So we had 50 Chromebooks
within our environment, and they started to gain a
better understanding of how to use Chromebooks, how to
help our other team members to use the Chrome browser. And from there on in we then
gradually moved into Pixelbooks across our province. JASON TAHANEY: My story is
very similar to Donna’s. Our entry point to the Chrome
devices was through G Suite. And we went live about two years
ago with the G Suite products, includes email. We used the Chromebooks
for training and education during that time. They were really great. We kind of had this
mobile team that went out, we have a lot of
physician practices. We’re kind of in a
rural part of Jersey. I mean, 30 minutes
away is not so rural but we still have rural areas. So a lot of our
physician practices– we used it as a tool to get
out and train and educate and it worked very well. We’re also using
Chrome in IT heavily. We use it on our help
desk with the integration, with all the G Suite. Looking at G Suite as a platform
has worked very well for us in IT. And just moving out of IT,
our standard issue laptops– are starting to deploy them
as our standard issue laptops. So a new employee comes
to the organization, you’re going to be
getting a Chromebook. And for us it was security. We had look at what the
strength of it, we felt, was it’s modern
operating system. It was secure by default– which is very important in
health care with all the data breaches that we
have to challenge. It had to integrate with
our Windows environment as well– very important. And we used VDI VMware
Horizon as that product, but you can use Citrix as
well, and it works very well. So we were very happy with it. And we’re going to
be doing a lot more. We want to move it out
to our clinical desktops. So we have a tap and go solution
called, Health Cast and it needs to support that
product and I believe it’s coming this quarter. Once that’s
available, then we’re going to get Chrome’s
license out to our clinicians and we’re excited about that. DIANA CHONG: That’s awesome. Awesome to hear about
some future plans. And we’ll talk more about
the future plans as well. But in fact, let’s just
kind of jump right in. What did that implementation
process look like for you, in terms of getting Chrome
into your environment and into the hands
of your end users? JASON TAHANEY: Sure. So we started with
a proof of concept. And I mean, the important things
like I mentioned were security, it had to be easy to use. We also were looking
for some cost savings in there
too, because that was kind of the promise of it. And on the security
front, the promise has worked out very well. I mean, you needed
expensive software in our Windows environment
to deploy encryption, to take one example. And the fact that it comes by
default in our Chromebooks. And also tying to that, patching
and kind of the standard things you need to do in the Windows
environment, the Chrome devices auto patch and do a
very nice job of that. We really don’t have to– I don’t want to say it’s
set it and forget it kind of– in security you
never want to do that. But it’s giving us a
good sense of confidence during the proof of concept. DIANA CHONG: Do you
happen to remember or do you have a sense
of how long it took for you to kind of prove it out. How long did POC take for
you to really make that go, no go decision? JASON TAHANEY: We did
about three months. But just because we were
doing the security part of it. We wanted to integrate it
into our Microsoft environment as well for authentication. So we want to make sure users
are using the same username and password that they used
to log into their Windows computer– make sure that
worked on Chrome devices. And so that part of
it worked very well. Also the ease of use and want to
understand– we kind of put it out to some of our clinicians
to kind of see, hey, what do you think of this? It is going to work pretty well? And we actually created
some power users to help us with that process. And we got really good feedback. I would say that we did a
lot of training and education in the beginning,
but I would say I don’t believe
you really need it. I think I heard the number
is about 1.5 billion Gmail users today. And these are Chrome devices,
but having that familiarity, it’s very similar. Google kind of
keeps their feel– they keep their products and
the look and feel very similar. And I think that’s
carried over into Chrome and it’s worked out pretty well. DIANA CHONG: And
Josh, maybe we can talk a little bit about your
implementation process as well. And what were some
of the challenges that you experienced while
you’re piloting it and then rolling it out to the stores? JOSHUA CHADD: Yeah,
I would probably say the biggest
challenges we had were the logistics
of just shipping a device from a central
location to about 10,000 different stores that
are geographically diverse and without having to do a
lot of pre-configuration, as well as implementing the
security that we needed. So we had to partner
with Google Agosto to write a custom app for us
for an out of box experience. So when it did actually
get to a store, they could go through a
very short set up process so that we could– on our side in IT– we could identify
where that device is. So if the store
calls in, we don’t need them to read off a serial
number or something like that. We can just look
up their location and find the affected device. And the other piece was
getting client certificates on the device as
easy as possible. And with that, we also
used product Cloud Path to integrate in with
our PKI so that we could during the enrollment
process provision certificates onto that device for things like
Wi-Fi access and client cert auth for certain internal sites. DIANA CHONG: And
I know I remember when we were doing the
deployment initially, there were a bunch of
security considerations that you guys had to
account for with Starbucks. Maybe you can speak a little
bit about that as well– the challenges there. JOSHUA CHADD: Yeah, so one thing
that we really were careful of is we wanted this to
be a shared device. So in a store of anywhere
from 10 to 100 partners that work in there, that no
data is going to stay resident on the device after
the session is done, as well as there is no
data from a store manager that’s accessible by a
barista or someone else that they don’t need to see. So that was a huge
consideration for us. So we actually run
our Chromebooks in kind of an ephemeral mode,
where every time they log off, every single thing
about that session is wiped from the computer. So it maintains security and a
security posture, and also just a legal compliance posture
that works really well for our company. DIANA CHONG: OK, thank you. And Donna, your turn. We’ll talk a little
bit– now we’re moving into more of the
changed management front. And Donna definitely
led a huge effort there for her particular
implementation. So maybe you can
speak a little bit about what’s required
from a change management perspective for Chrome
and a bit of G Suite since they’re all tied together. DONNA CHORNAWKA: For sure. We went live in July 2017
and we have over 5,500 team members– that’s what
we call our employees– that are located across the
province of Alberta in Canada and we have over 300 locations. And so for us as
we looked at how to introduce Chrome
and implement G Suite across the province, and
to help all of our team members through the change, learning
both the G Suite toolset but then also accessing
Chrome browser, we really took a
different look at it and how we can help our folks. And so really for us the three
success key factors for that was that we went out and
we seconded 50 people from across our province, who
we then called G Evangelists. And what they were were really
folks that were very diverse. They were from all
regions of our province, so it wasn’t just the big urban
cities, it was from rural areas as well. They were also selected
from people from– as we are a financial
institution– we had people from
our tellers, our CSRs, all the way up to managing
directors in corporate office. And what that did is
really bring together a diverse group of 50 people who
really we trained in a 30 day boot camp on G Suite,
on Chrome, on how to help our team members. And really it was about
listening to our team members and helping them
through the change. Our key mantra was no one
was going to be left behind. Because we’re an
80-year-old startup company, and it’s really
about understanding that we had people who have just
started with a company when we went live and we
also had people who had been in our financial
institution for over 30 years, right. And so it’s really understanding
that team members and people all go through their
own change management curve in a different way. And so this was really key
for us to be successful. As we went through the
change the following year, we then introduced Pixelbooks
into our environment. And so I would say the
second success factor there was we really focused on
our C Suite and our executives first. And you might
think, wow, that was pretty bold to have
them test your tools, and was that a lot
of handholding? And I would say it wasn’t. They really found
the tool easy to use. And we thought that if
they would be onside, that they would be our
biggest cheerleaders. And they were. So it really became that
they came to us and said, we want our teams to have this. We want our leaders to have it. And so right now most of our
users are C Suite or executive, and for sure the branch managers
located across our province. And then the third
key success factor I would say is last
year we brought in-house all of our technical
supports or IT help desk. And so what we did is
we really grew a team of who we called tech gurus. So we don’t call them IT help
desk, we call them tech gurus. And they’re really
customer service oriented. And so they’re really there to
help all of our team members with Chrome, their questions,
as well as Pixelbooks. And we utilize– you kind
of heard this morning on the keynote speaker– we really utilize chat for
our team members to come in and ask questions. So we have chat rooms set up, so
you can access our tech gurus. We have over 3,000
people already in our tech chat room asking
questions about how to do this, how to do that. And then the second
part of that group, we also have product managers
who provide support on G Suite. And so we have a Google G
Suite chat room as well. And so between those
two forums, we’re able to have a group of
our own ATB team members helping ATB team member’s
with their technology. DIANA CHONG: Great. Would you do anything different? If you were to do this again,
would you do both together again, G Suite and Chrome? Were there any challenges to
doing them so close together? DONNA CHORNAWKA: Yeah, we would
definitely do it together. Because as they were learning
how to access G Suite, it just came in really easy
to then introduce Chrome. So we would definitely
do that over again. JASON TAHANEY:
And I would agree. I would agree with that. Maybe deploy more during G
Suite, because it really was– we recognized it was good
value to doing the education, but we didn’t quite
totally get it and it took a little
bit longer to deploy. So I definitely would deploy
more when you’re doing G Suite and moving into Chrome. DIANA CHONG: And now
let’s talk about the aha moment for you guys. When did you guys decide
Chrome was the right way to go, in terms
of the technology that you want to
move your work to. Maybe we’ll just start down
the row again from Josh. JOSHUA CHADD: Yeah,
I think for us it was really during
the pilot phase when we were seeing
kind of the issues that our pilot stories
were calling in about and how simple
they were to solve. Because we eliminated a
lot of points of failure over a more traditional
kind of a Windows device that we’d had previously. So really there were
just very few things that we had to spend
time troubleshooting. And it freed up a lot more
time for our help desk analysts to work on much more complex
calls, because they could solve things much more easily
or the stores themselves could solve it without
ever having to call in. DIANA CHONG: And I think when we
talked about it before you were saying that there were
fewer calls coming in from Chrome specifically. And now it’s just basically
you managing everything coming in for Chrome. JOSHUA CHADD: Yeah, It’s pretty
much today we’re in, I think, year four of our deployment. And I’m the primary engineer. And there are a couple
of analysts on my team that also help support it,
as well as our help desk operation. But we have very few calls,
very few things escalated to us. It’s probably less
than 5% of the work that we have come in today,
just to do any kind of support activities around them. DIANA CHONG: That’s great. And Donna, how about your
aha moment with Chrome? DONNA CHORNAWKA: Yeah, because
we introduced it with G Suite, the aha moment
came just as we saw people utilizing G
Suite in a much more collaborative fashion. And so my aha
moment really came, we also introduced
and put in CFMs in all of our meeting
rooms at the same time, and so my aha
moment was just how easy it was to take
in your Chromebook or your Pixelbook into
one of our meeting rooms, have the CFM right
there and you just connect to that to the meeting. And so just the ecosystem
with having CFMs, Pixelbooks, and G Suite altogether
was my aha moment, by saying this is a great, easy
experience for team members to use. DIANA CHONG: That’s great. JASON TAHANEY: And for us,
I think there was a couple. One was really when
our departments were coming to us for Chromebooks. They had seen them,
other people had them, and they were just coming
to us for Chromebooks, as well as wanting to use
them with G Suite application. So one example was our
patient safety huddles, leadership meets daily to kind
of review any potential safety hazards in the organization. And we were using Chromebooks
for that and Google Sheets, so those two products
to kind of track what we’re doing
around patient safety. And it came to us,
right, we didn’t have to sell it, do
anything like that. And another example was in
our emergency department, they actually developed
their own internet site with Google Sites
on Chrome devices. Because we were a large
Microsoft SharePoint customer prior to this, so
moving to Team Drive and the suite of
products with Chrome was probably one
of our goals was to consolidate all that
data that we had out there. And so we were
driving that project, but then we also had
departments coming to us, like the ED, where they
wanted to do their own thing. So that was pretty nice. And then IT, I would just
agree on the management side. It’s just incredibly easy
to manage, especially on the security side. Whenever you hear
security is easy, you kind of question
that a little bit. But it truly has been for us. We have standardized
on Chrome browsers as well, and then the Chrome
devices that are out there. Seeing that auto patching work
and running a report and see, is this actually really working? And seeing that it is. And by the way, we’re doing
it without any extra software so it’s included– it’s
part of the platform, which is very nice. And you get these
features by default. And they’re
constantly innovating. I mean, that’s one
of our main reasons why we went with Google was
because of their ability to innovate. And we felt they
were the best vendor to do that as a cloud provider. DIANA CHONG: And so
what’s next for you– for all of you, I guess– in terms of your Chrome journey? Where are you going
with adoption? Are you rolling
out more devices? JASON TAHANEY: Well,
definitely for us, we’re going to roll
out more devices. We have the partnership
with Health Cast and Google, that’s really any day now. And Health Cast is a
tap and go solution. So that’s kind of
big in health care, being able to move from
computer to computer and have your desktop
session move with you via tap and go via an employee badge. So once that is certified
to run on Chrome, which is coming any day, we’re
going to be moving that out to all our clinicians
on anywhere we provide patient care. And we’re excited about
that, because right now those are Windows devices that
are not do– they’re really sort of like a kiosk. They’re not actually using the
underlying operating system on that device. So there’s really no reason
to have that out there and have to worry
about patching it for security and all those kind
of challenges that we have. So putting the Chrome
devices out there, we feel very
confident that’s going to give us a nice secure tool
out there for our clinicians. It’s not going to get in the
way of what they do every day. And it’s going to be
a lot easier for IT to manage than just
the normal IT headaches that you have managing
a lot of devices. DONNA CHORNAWKA: Yeah,
very similar to continue to roll out Pixelbooks and
replace our Window environment and the laptops out
there right now. And again, just
showcasing and advocating how easy a Pixelbook is to
use and just helping people adopt that. So again, continuing
to roll out Pixelbooks within our environment. DIANA CHONG: And Josh. JOSHUA CHADD: Yeah,
and for us, we’re really just looking at
refining the overall experience on our very large
fleet that’s out there. So really just making it
maybe a little bit quicker, seeing what other use cases
within the store it makes sense to put on there,
and different workloads, as well as just making
access into that faster for specific
apps or functions that the stores do today. And just overall making it a
really easy experience for them and just continue
on that journey. DIANA CHONG: Excellent. And then for those members
of the audience that are here learning about Chromebooks
for the first time, what kind of advice do you guys have for
customers who are evaluating it for the first time? JASON TAHANEY: I would say
it’s very easy to deploy. Your user bases– the training–
you don’t really need that much training and education and we
thought we did and we found that we didn’t. And for us, it’s a
modern operating system, so anytime we can do that in
health care is a good thing. So depending on your industry,
I would just jump in. I would just do it. It’s worked out
very well for us. DONNA CHORNAWKA: Yeah,
I would echo that. I would definitely support it. If you would have seen the
keynote speaker this morning, our CTO, Wellington
Holbrook, had said we would never go
back off of G Suite. And so I would just
add an and on to that, is that since we’ve
gone on to G Suite and used the Chrome browser
and use our Pixelbooks, we would never go back. We are all about looking at
our team member experience and using that technology and
ensuring that it’s a seamless and it’s a good experience. And so as you can
imagine, as we run a bank is that we always want our
team members who are front facing in front of our customers
to have technology that works for them great,
and that is seamless, and it’s easy to use. Because we always
want our team members to have a good experience
with their technology that just enables them to
provide a better customer experience. And so as we look at
what those tools are, we continue to
look at Chrome, we continue to look at Pixelbooks,
and say how might we make this work for them. JOSHUA CHADD: Yeah, and
for us, it’s very much just through that lens of
security and how easy it was to implement
the security, how easy it was to do it at scale and
to manage it all at scale. I manage a lot of users,
I manage a lot of devices, and it’s just very simple, even
at pretty much every stage, with a very small team to
deploy a very large number of these devices very quickly. [MUSIC PLAYING]

Danny Hutson

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