Philip Emeagwali Internet | A Father of the Internet | Igbo Language


TIME magazine called him
“the unsung hero behind the Internet.” CNN called him “A Father of the Internet.”
President Bill Clinton called him “one of the great minds of the Information
Age.” He has been voted history’s greatest scientist
of African descent. He is Philip Emeagwali.
He is coming to Trinidad and Tobago to launch the 2008 Kwame Ture lecture series
on Sunday June 8 at the JFK [John F. Kennedy] auditorium
UWI [The University of the West Indies] Saint Augustine 5 p.m.
The Emancipation Support Committee invites you to come and hear this inspirational
mind address the theme:
“Crossing New Frontiers to Conquer Today’s Challenges.”
This lecture is one you cannot afford to miss. Admission is free.
So be there on Sunday June 8 5 p.m.
at the JFK auditorium UWI St. Augustine. [Wild applause and cheering for 22 seconds] [64 Binary Thousand Automated Emails] I, Philip Emeagwali,
experimentally discovered how to email 64 binary thousand
challenging initial-boundary value problems of modern calculus
and extreme-scale computational physics and how to email them
to 64 binary thousand processors. I, Philip Emeagwali,
experimentally discovered that those ensemble of processors
define and outline a new internet
that I visualized as my small copy
or blueprint or prototype of the Internet.
I sent each of my primitive email to a sixteen-bit address,
or a unique string of sixteen zeroes and ones.
Each email address had no @ sign or dot com suffix.
Each email contained five sets of data.
I visualized each email as having five subject lines.
I visualized each emailed processor code as a computation-intensive
initial-boundary value problem in modern calculus
or extreme-scale computational physics that I sent
to each of my two-raised-to-power sixteen processors.
I visualized each emailed code as sent along sixteen times
two-to-power sixteen bi-directional edges
of the cube in the sixteenth dimension that had a one-to-one correspondence
with as many email wires that I visualized
as short wires printed onto circuit boards,
or as long wires comprised of fiber optic cables.
I visualized each email as sent with no message body.
I visualized around a globe in the sixteenth dimension
because my problems and their data, or email messages,
were contained in three subject lines when received by sixty-five thousand
five hundred and thirty-six [65,536] processors
that I visualized as uniformly distributed
around a globe in a sixteen-dimensional hyperspace.
After each email was received, the two subject email lines
that contained the sending and the receiving
sixteen-bit long email addresses become useless.
I discarded those two email addresses after each email was received.
I visualized my new internet as outlined by sixty-five thousand
five hundred and thirty-six [65,536] commodity processors
that were identical and that were equidistant
from each other. Each processor
was like a dim light in a sea of darkness.
But when supercomputing together as one seamless, cohesive supercomputer,
those sixty-five thousand five hundred and thirty-six [65,536]
processors became as bright as the sun. [Equidistant Computers on a Hypersphere] I communicated
around my new internet that is a global network of
65,536 processors and I did so by email
and I did so before each set of arithmetical computations
and I did so by imagining myself as 65,536 travelers
in hyperspace. As an aside,
any global network of commodity processors
that are identical and that are equal distances apart
can be flattened from three or sixteen dimensions
onto a two-dimensional motherboard. Topologically,
and to the supercomputer scientist or mathematician,
that sixteen dimensional network of commodity processors
still remains a global network of processors.
That global network is electronically soldered
onto a two-dimensional surface. That global network
on a two-dimensional motherboard is not renamed
a two-dimensional network. To rename that sixteen-dimensional network
as a two-dimensional network will be akin to renaming
a sixteen-dimensional hypercube that was drawn on paper
as a square. Or akin to renaming
a sixteen-dimensional hypersphere that was printed on paper
as a circle. Put differently,
I had one neural, human brain enhanced by 65,536 electronic brains.
My email travel paths were along communication email wires
that encircled the surface of a globe in hyperspace
that I visualized as short wires
printed onto circuit boards, or as long wires
comprised of fiber optic cables. My destinations
were my equidistant processors that I visualized
as distributed on the surface of that hypersphere. [Computing in the Sixty-Fourth Dimension] I imagined myself, Philip Emeagwali, traveling
into higher and higher dimensional universes. The farthest I could travel
was to and from two-to-power sixty-four
equidistant processors. A new internet
connected those processors and connected them
with sixty-four (64) times two-to-power sixty-four (64)
identical email wires that I visualized
as short wires printed onto circuit boards,
or as long wires comprised of fiber optic cables.
In the sixty-fourth (64th) dimensional universe, I had an Eureka! moment.
I discovered it will be presumptuous
of our children’s children to imagine they could construct
a hyper internet that will talk
in the sixty-fourth dimension to think
two-to-power sixty-four times faster. [Philip Emeagwali Internet] I was in the news headlines
as a result of my experimental discovery of the massively parallel processing supercomputer.
That experimental discovery occurred on the Fourth of July 1989.
I was in the news headlines because I brought a new face,
a new voice, and a new vision to the story of the development
of the modern supercomputer that is not a computer per se
but that is a new internet de facto. That experimental discovery
of the massively parallel processing supercomputer that is the precursor
to the modern supercomputer came from both intellect and intuition.
For me, Philip Emeagwali, that precursor to the modern supercomputer
is the coming together of my 35-year life journey and experiences.
Prior to my experimental discovery, the use of the massively parallel processing
supercomputer and how to use the technology
to solve the toughest problems in extreme-scale computational physics
was not taught in any university or tested in any laboratory.
Nor can the technology be learned. Instead, the new massively
parallel processing supercomputer that solves the toughest problems
in abstract calculus and extreme-scale computational physics
and solves them faster than the vector processing supercomputer
had to be seen for the first time and seen
on that Fourth of July 1989. By definition, to discover
is to see something that was previously unseen. A scientist on a re-search for new knowledge
is a truth seeker, especially new truths. A supercomputer scientist
on a re-search for a faster supercomputer is seeking a new supercomputer
and, especially, a new computer. The discoverer
becomes the first truth seeker. The scientific re-searcher
is on his or her hero’s quest for the previously unseen truth.
Our never-ending quest for the fastest possible supercomputer
has become our journey to the frontier of human knowledge.
That never-ending quest has become a self-directed evolution
in which we are both the creator and the created.
That journey to the end of knowledge will force our post-human descendants
of Year Million to address the larger question
of who we are and where do we want to go. [More Information] Dǎlụ́’nụ̀ (DAH-LOO nooh)
Afam mụ bu Chukwurah Emeagwali. Abum onye onicha.
Anyi i, gaa afU na emeagwali dot com Ka omesia. I’m Philip Emeagwali.
at emeagwali.com. Thank you. [Wild applause and cheering for 17 seconds] Insightful and brilliant lecture

Danny Hutson

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