NACADA Core Values

NACADA Core Values


As you may already know, NACADA’s core values support the core competencies for advisors. NACADA has had a set of core values for a number of years, but upon recent examination, the previous set of core values was really more about what we do, and didn’t really explain who we are as advisors, nor did it provide a framework of who we might want to become as advisors This new set of core values reflects the many cultural and educational contexts in which academic advising is practiced. These values apply to all who perform academic advising by any role, any title, or position as educators. And while advisors may experience unique circumstances when advising, these core values provide guidance to advisors in their professional lives. If you were with us for December’s webinar you heard Sara introduce this graphic. As you can see, NACADA’s core values are respect, professionalism, inclusivity, integrity, empowerment, commitment, and caring. Each of these values is core to the practice of academic advising and fundamental to the advising profession. No one value is more important than any other; all are equally important. Jayne Drake and Joanne Damminger, past presidents of NACADA, co-led the task force for the development of the statement of core values. So let’s hear from them about this process Jayne and I are really pleased to join this webinar to tell you about the work of the core values task force that was first formed in fall of 2015. The charge to the task force on the board of directors was to solicit as broad a discussion as possible about the association’s core values across the membership to help ensure that the resulting new core value statement would continue to shape the future of the profession in general, and guide professional practice in particular. The charge specifically invited the task force to review the current statement of core values and make any recommendations to the board for revisions, Seeking input from as many NACADA members as possible. The charge also provided the task force the flexibility to let the review process unfold as it would, without preconceived expectations or conclusions, and we weren’t even given a set completion date, which actually was extremely valuable in the work that we did. And that’s what happened; we let the process unfold and it took two years to complete the process. Over those two years, the task force collected comments, questions, concerns, and suggestions from all ten regions, NACADA summer and winter institutes, a webinar in June of 2016, town hall meetings, and the past president forums at the Las Vegas conference and other conferences including our international partner conferences and conversations that took place there. At each of these venues, we defined core values as beliefs that influence how we act, and we uniformly ask the same question of our members. As members of the advising profession, what are the most important values that guide your practice? Interestingly, the observations made and the conclusions drawn from each of these venues echoed the same actually around the world. We heard about the challenges that the membership expressed regarding the NACADA core values document that had been in place for the past ten years. And certainly we know that it had served its time well, but now it needed some revision. We also learned that the existing core value statements did not fully recognize and account for the current NACADA demographics and the present state of advising as it exists across the globe today. So the more we listened, the more we learned that the membership wanted and needed a document that clearly indicated who we are rather than what we do. So that’s a little bit about the history of the task force and our work. I’m going to hand it over to Jayne who will now tell you the rest of the story. Jayne. Thanks, Joanne. For both of us, it was both enlightening and gratifying to see the value words that emerged from each session across the country. What we noticed is that they were largely the same. Reinforcing the belief that advising professionals, no matter their geographic location, no matter the size of the institution, or their student populations, all had the same basic tenants that inform their professional practice. So the work that resulted in a broad sweep of values is the resulting seven core values that we now have. We received hundreds of suggestions, and from those hundreds of suggestions submitted to us, the task force discussed, negotiated, amalgamated, and winnowed down the list to the new seven core value words, The group then worked painstakingly, and I do mean painstakingly, to develop the narrative definitions for each. And the resulting document was then taken back to all ten regions and the other venues that Joanne mentioned for final discussion before a polished document was submitted to the Board of Directors for its review, comment, and approval. We’re learning so much about how the core values can be used in actual practice, and are already being used in the profession and the practice of advising. Just to give you several examples, they are being used as benchmarks in the hiring and promotion practices for primary role advisors and for faculty advisors. Institutions are finding them helpful in crafting their vision, values, and goal statements for advising. And they are also importantly influencing individual advisors in their professional practices in their work with their students. And we would like to end by pointing out that the new seven core values are by no means to be considered exhaustive, but they clearly represent the best thinking of our global community for academic advising and will serve for a very long time as critical guideposts for advisors everywhere, and to institutions as they work to enhance student success initiatives on their campus. So thank you for letting us share the information about the core values. Now back to the webinar

Danny Hutson

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