Leveraging Native AWS Services with VMware Cloud on AWS | Database Replacement with RDS

Leveraging Native AWS Services with VMware Cloud on AWS | Database Replacement with RDS


Hey everybody, Matt Wallace from Faction.
We’re here today to talk to you more about VMware Cloud on AWS
integrations with Amazon native services. In this part of this series, we’re going
to talk about basically being able to offload your database workload from a
traditional VMware environment up into Amazon’s cloud services. So if you’re not
super familiar with AWS, they operate a service called Relational
Database Service (RDS). And what Amazon does is they allow you to deploy database
instances based on things like MySQL, PostgreSQL, Microsoft SQL Server, or
Amazon’s own in-house Aurora DB, and actually deploy those. They run directly
inside the private networking of your virtual private cloud inside of AWS. What we conceptualize is this idea that you know a lot of the customers
that we’re talking to are in the process of doing a migration to VMC. So you
know, you might think about a customer who’s down here in “on-prem land” today,
but they’re planning a migration over here to VMware Cloud on AWS. And of
course, VMware Cloud on AWS is basically just like the SDDC environment you run
on-prem. It’s based on vSphere, vSAN, NSX. But if you have vSphere on-prem, you’re
compatible essentially with VMware Cloud on AWS. You can bring your entire
stack over, your applications, your database, your web servers, and bring it
to VMware Cloud on AWS pretty much as it is. But one of the thoughts that we
think is you know if you’re dealing with high touch maintenance on database
instances today, you might be able to save a lot of time and effort by
shifting some of those instances up into Amazon native. This Elastic Network
Interface (ENI) is a private interconnection between the VMware Cloud on AWS
environment and your VPC inside of Amazon. What you’d be able to do in a
migration scenario is take this database essentially stand up a Relational
Database instance inside of AWS and then essentially migrate that data here using
replication, that sort of thing. Once you’ve made the move of that data to this RDS database now your application servers, which used to
connect to this database, you can get rid of that connection and have them
connecting to this database. The advantage there is that with Amazon Web
Services with RDS you know things like backups, things like
replication, things like failover, basically can all be accomplished
completely through the RDS automation. And so you know instead of having all
the complication of managing those things yourself you get rid of that part
of the stack move it up to AWS native. So it’s a really powerful thing,
and to these application servers it seems basically the same, right? This is
all running in one Amazon data center, so the connection to this and the
connection to this really look identical from the application perspective. So
that’s just one way that using an Amazon native service can help simplify your
VMware environment, allow you to scale, and allow your team to get more done in
less time. Faction’s been working on these type of
composite architectures with our customers so if you’re interested in
talking about VMware Cloud on AWS, how you can replace some of your on-prem
environments maybe close the data center with it, and you’re interested in how you
can save time and money and scale faster and be more agile with services like
Relational Database Service on top of your VMC environment – get in touch with
Faction we’d love to talk to you!

Danny Hutson

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