Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Gen 2 20QT001XUS 15.6″ Mobile Workstation

Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Gen 2 20QT001XUS 15.6″ Mobile Workstation


Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Review. The ThinkPad P1 is a portable powerhouse with
a sleek, lightweight design and awesome performance. If the ThinkPad P1 had a longer runtime and
its 4K panel weren’t so dim, this machine would be the workstation to beat. Even so, the ThinkPad P1 is an excellent option
for anyone looking for a portable powerhouse. And it’s earned a spot on our Best Workstations
page. If I had to close my eyes and paint a picture
of a Lenovo Thinkpad laptop from memory, the P1 is exactly what would come to mind. The P1 has a uniform, matt-black finish, giving
it a stealthy appearance that reminds me of a B-2 bomber. That simple design is only broken by pops
of red color on the rubber pointing stick, touchpad clicker and the light-up ThinkPad
logo on the lid and deck. Throw away your dongles; the ThinkPad P1 has
you covered on ports. Despite the workstation’s slim size, the P1
has a wide variety of modern inputs, including a headphone jack, a proprietary Mini Gigabit
Ethernet port, an HDMI 2.0, two Thunderbolt 3 ports and an AC power connector on the left
side. An SD card reader, two USB 3.1 ports and a
Kensington lock take up the right side. There is an also an optional smart card reader
for added security. The ThinkPad P1 proves that a workstation
doesn’t need to weigh as much as chain mail to have ample protection against the elements. Made of four layers of reinforced carbon fiber,
which means it can withstand various harsh conditions, including high humidity, sand
and dust exposure, extreme temperatures and mechanical shock. Business professionals should also feel reassured
by the P1’s suite of security features. On the deck, to the right of the keyboard,
is a stock fingerprint sensor for faster and more secure login. The ThinkPad P1’s 15.6-inch, 4K display isn’t
very bright, but its exceptional detail and vibrant colors more than make up for that
drawback. The ThinkPad P1’s backlit keyboard is so good
I almost felt inspired to write a novel. In all seriousness, these comfortable keys
live up to, and perhaps even exceed, the lofty reputation of Lenovo’s ThinkPad keyboards. The 2.2 millimeters of key travel, far above
our 1.5-mm preference, kept me from bottoming out, even with my aggressive typing style. Positioned in the center of the keyboard is
the iconic ThinkPad pointing stick. While I’m not among the narrow group of users
who swear by it, I didn’t have any issues using the little rubber nub to navigate the
web. The ThinkPad P1 is very much the Manny Pacquiao
of laptops: it’s slim-framed but packs one heck of a punch. Equipped with a business-grade Intel Xeon,
the ThinkPad P1 didn’t bat an eye in my real-world performance test. The laptop swiftly loaded 14 Google Chrome
tabs and didn’t stutter at all when I played two 1080pixel YouTube video and two Twitch
streams. The ThinkPad P1 has plenty of graphics power
under the hood for gamers and software designers alike. The bottom-firing speakers on the ThinkPad
P1 are loud enough to fill a medium-size room, and their audio quality is solid. The 720p webcam, mercifully located above
the ThinkPad P1’s display, produces decent photos. My facial features were clearly defined in
a selfie under our dim office lighting, but the color of my warm skin tone was exaggerated. The ThinkPad P1 is a great choice for business
users who need enough power to run demanding programs or designers who desire the best,
highest-res display. What really makes the ThinkPad P1 stand out
from its competitors is its thin, lightweight and durable chassis, which could easily be
mistaken for a premium ultrabook, not a workstation. My biggest complaints with the ThinkPad P1
are its below-average battery life and relatively dim display. Also, the underside of the chassis reached
uncomfortable temperatures under a heavy workload. Kindly see the description for this Amazon
product link. Thanks for watching this product review video. Kindly like and subscribe our YouTube channel.

Danny Hutson

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