Krokodil: Russia’s Deadliest Drug (NSFW)

Krokodil: Russia’s Deadliest Drug (NSFW)


[MUSIC PLAYING] MALE SPEAKER 1:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] [SOVIET ANTHEM PLAYING] ALISON SEVERS: In 1979, the
Soviet army entered Afghanistan, engaging in a
brutal 10-year conflict which kick-started the Afghan
opium trade. It was sold all over the world
to help fund the fight against the Soviets, but the main
customers of the opium were the Russians themselves. After the fall of the Soviet
union in 1991, Russia’s heroin problem continued to grow. So much so, that in 2011, the
country has become the world’s biggest consumer of heroin. [MUSIC CONTINUES] ALISON SEVERS: With a southern
border more than 4,000 miles long, we’re talking about a
patrol area greater than the distance from New
York to London. It’s no wonder the drug trade
is out of control. We travelled to the small
Siberian city of Novokuznetsk, which lies just over the
Russian border with Kazakhstan, and is
on the front line of this heroin epidemic. Once a Siberian industrial
powerhouse, now this city has fallen into decline, with 20%
of its population allegedly addicted to heroin. We’d heard stories about
ex-addicts building coffins to bury their friends, and
religious cults disguised as rehab clinics. Worst of all though were rumors
of a new moonshine drug called krokodil that has some
terrifying consequences. Nowhere are Russia’s
drug problems more evident than here. We’ve come to an area where
there’s a lot of derelict building that are being squatted
by addicts as a place to use and to live. Everywhere I look around
me, there are syringes. There’s more syringes here
than I’ve ever seen in my entire life. MALE SPEAKER 2:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: Why are
you hanging out here? MALE SPEAKER 2:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: This area is
called Zavodskoy and was once the purpose-built
housing estates of the Soviet workforce. Now, these imposing tower blocks
are just empty shells. These young men have been
living in this abandoned building for two months. MALE SPEAKER 3:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 4:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 5:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 4:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 5:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 4:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKERS:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 3:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKERS:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 3:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 4:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 3:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 4:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE INTERVIEWER: When was the
last time you went to see a doctor or a hospital? MALE SPEAKER 3:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 6:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 3:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] [MUSIC PLAYING] ALISON SEVERS: Sasha Pelikhov
works for an organization called Regenerate Russia,
which helps rehabilitate heroin addicts in
Novokuznetsk. Sasha explained to us that there
might be more to the drug trade than just
making money. SASHA PELIKHOV:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: There’s a widely
held belief that a phenomenon called
narcoterrorism fuels the drug trade. It’s said that Afghan terror
groups help expediate the supply of heroin to Russia in
order to both profit from their former invaders and also
weaken the population by poisoning them with heroin. This is what’s known as
the Golden Crescent. It’s the route that heroin
takes from northern Afghanistan, throughout Central
Asia, and into Russia. Sasha told us that the center of
the local trade was at the food markets just outside
the city center. It’s where trucks from
Kazakhstan are offloaded with heroin for distribution
around Novokuznetsk and the wider areas. We were told to approach this
place with extreme caution, and not to get out of the car. As we drove slowly through the
market, we noticed gangs of men doing business next
to their trucks. Many of them bore Kazakhstan
license plates. It didn’t take long
to get us noticed. All of a sudden, someone spotted
our cameras, and people started beeping their
horns and yelling. MALE SPEAKER 7: Why are
people beeping? MALE SPEAKER 7: Yeah,
everyone’s checking us out now. MALE SPEAKER 8: Yeah, let’s
just get the fuck out. MALE SPEAKER 7: Let’s get
the fuck out of there. Let’s go. Let’s go. Let’s go. ALISON SEVERS: There’s two
pretty snazzy cars behind us. Those are the first snazzy
cars I’ve seen since we’ve been here. Probably going to follow
us and kill us now. The vans have got along the
right-hand side of the number plate, had KZ, which means,
obviously, the cars have been trucked in from Kazakhstan. MALE SPEAKER 9: It doesn’t
mean Kool Zines? ALISON SEVERS: No. It doesn’t mean kool zines. It means fucking naughty
heroin trafficker from Kazakhstan. That’s what it fucking means. Well, there’s still a car
that looks the same. Or maybe all the cars
just look the same. OK. We lost the cars and headed back
to meet Sasha somewhere safe, or so we thought. MALE SPEAKER 10:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: It kind of just
feels like walking into a forest in the middle of Siberia,
plus a lot of very angry dogs. That one actually did that
whole, like, err, I’m going to fucking kill you thing. After about five minutes of
walking through Vorstadt, we met this guy. Sasha told us he was salvaging
scrap metal, which is the most common way for heroin users
to fund their addiction. MALE SPEAKER 11:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] [MUSIC PLAYING] MALE SPEAKER 11:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] [DOG GROWLING AND BARKING] MALE SPEAKER 9: What is it? ALISON SEVERS: Because I can’t
see where the syringes are. They’re fucking everywhere. Opposite the rehabilitation
center, there’s just a deserted building where there’s
syringes all over the floor, and, like, empty
bottles of this stuff. ALISON SEVERS: What’s this? Sasha. MALE SPEAKER 12:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] SASHA PELIKHOV: What
is in Tropikamid? [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: Sasha explained
that the eyedrops were one of the main ingredients of a new
drug called krokodil, a kind of moonshine heroin. Krokodil is so called because it
turns the user’s skin scaly and eats them from
the inside out. SASHA PELIKHOV:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: That woman walked
past us earlier when we were on our way out
to the brothel. And Sasha told me the she’s on
the road, which mean she’s a working prostitute. She’s just walked past now. She’s met up with a guy, and
she’s going to go have sex with him down there. Brilliant. That’s completely depressing. Fucking hell. With high volumes of drug
addicts comes high volumes of prostitution. And Novokuznetsk is
no exception. What was worrying here was
how young the girls were. So over there, I can
see two girls. One of them looks about 14, and
they’ve been talking to a succession of men who are
stopping in cars at the side of the street. And in fact there’s so much
going on here with crime and drug use, you’d expect to see
police cars and ambulances, but I haven’t seen
any of them. [MUSIC PLAYING] NATASHA: [SINGING IN RUSSIAN] [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: The Russian
government offers very little support for addicts. There are no local state-funded
rehab centers, and so the void has been
filled by private organizations. They range from centers like
this one, where the addicts provide volunteer work to pay
for their treatment, to evangelical churches that
have been accused of running like cults. OLEYSA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: I heard
a lot of people died. OLEYSA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] NATASHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: Oh. NATASHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] NATASHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] [CHOIR SINGING] ALISON SEVERS: After we left
the girls, we went to visit the priest of the main
orthodox church in Novokuznetsk. I had to wear a head scarf
in order to be able to talk to him. Spasibo. MINISTER VASILY:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: So this is the
bit that we bought in the shop in your church. And it says, Christian sects,
how they’re servants of the anti-Christ. Is this relevant in this city? MINISTER VASILY:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] YEVGENY: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: This
is Yevgeny. By day, he’s a funeral director,
and by night, he run the Novokuznetsk branch of Teen
Challenge, which is an American Christian charity that
now has missionaries and centers in over 70 countries
around the world, and it’s growing rapidly. He told us to come along to
meet his congregation in a remote part of the city which
was an hour drive up a very steep hill. And when we arrived,
we found this. [RUSSIAN ROCK MUSIC PLAYING] ALISON SEVERS: This is the
sleeping room for the brotherhood here at Teen
Challenge, which is Yevgeny’s church group [SINGING IN RUSSIAN[ ALISON SEVERS: This is a
rehabilitation center for people involved in Teen
Challenge, which is an American church that’s
come to Russia. And now Yevgeny practices
their doctrine. I think that Teen Challenge
is a cult, to be honest. MALE SPEAKER 13: Today, I
live here six months. Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Jesus Christ help me. [SINGING CONTINUES] MINISTER VASILY:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] [SINGING CONTINUES] [APPLAUSE] WORSHIP LEADER:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: This is Sergey. We met him begging outside on
the street, and he said most of the people he knew
have been affected by heroin and krokodil. SERGEY: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] SEREZHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: Later that night,
Sergey took us on a tour of local pharmacies to show
us how easy it is to pick up the ingredients
for krokodil. So these are 24-hour pharmacies that we’re going to. You can do this any
time of the day. SERGEY: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: Sergey said he
knew someone who could cook the krokodil for us. He promised to meet us again. That was the last
time we saw him. ALEXEY: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: Alexey is the
pastor of an independent church that reforms heroin
and krokodil addicts. ALEXEY: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: Alexey took us
to meet his friend, whose family has been destroyed
by krokodil. With a drug that can kill it
users so quickly, it’s very rare to meet survivors. LYUDMILA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MISHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] SERGEY: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: And you
been taking krokodil? SERGEY: We have, yeah. MISHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: When did
you start taking it? MISHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] SERGEY: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MISHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] LYUDMILA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: I felt quite
helpless leaving Lyudmila’s house, but nowhere near as
helpless as she must feel. Her health, home, and family
life have been totally destroyed by krokodil, a drug
you can just work out how to make with the help of
internet forums. President Medvedev has talked
about closing down the websites that are providing
this information, but the internet seems harder to
police than the border. I can’t see any way out for
these people if they’re relying on that. Drug users are developing new,
terrifying ways of consuming opiates faster than the
government can decide on any form of policy. The church and the sects aren’t
the answer, but sadly, they seem to be the best hope
these young people have in a city that really does feel
like it’s been forgotten.

Danny Hutson

100 thoughts on “Krokodil: Russia’s Deadliest Drug (NSFW)

  1. It's funny that Alison (the host) is demonizing drugs when she allegedly used to be a drug addict herself.

  2. I would not wear 10:30 that dress in that specific place, I'd stuff my pants just so if I fall somehow I don't end up sticking myself with a needle

  3. I learned how to do cold water extraction on pills around 15 16 17 I was fucked, never gonna fully recover but haven't dosed in over a decade.
    The horror of never coming back has haunted me, I am missing things that I threw away blindly.
    Life wasn't real for so long, and now it is and I already poked holes in my boat before I noticed.

  4. What really got to me is the damage these drugs do to survivors.

    It's one thing to wind up dead, but to survive all that, with permanent disability is truly fucked up.

  5. Some dude dealing in flakka said this krokodil shit is more dangerous than even the zombie drug itself😲😲🤯😱

  6. Presenter: Right guys, so im in an area where theres LOADS of syringes everywhere. Oh and not forgetting it is a red light district with many prostitutes operating so im just gonna dress the most scantily around here
    with a real short skirt so my legs are exposed to the syringes in case i trip and fall and also to expose my body to the punters

  7. And we're worried about them hacking our elections?? WTF?
    Just give them succinylcholine in the vial, and eliminate the problem…

  8. Desomorphine: a geometrically more potent derivative of pure morphine. Such potency WILL cause atrophying of your nervous system, muscles, and organs. Practically, overdosing nerve endings with morphine, inhibiting their natural regrowing process until there is no nerve left.
    In the simplest terms, you are giving yourself ALS.
    #BioChemistry
    Eli TheScienceGuy

  9. This reporter is ignorant and needs educating. Who told her what a cult is and what is her definition? She is clearly Anti God, does not know anything about Christianity or how she herself was created. Her education from a Western culture which teaches liberalism has influenced her into believing that anyone who shows a deep love and connection to God as creator is what – a cult member which is what? What is the difference between a cult and the Church she visited or a sect or what she inadvertently worships? because the Priest told her that there are two doctrines that are Orthodox anything else is a Sect and not a Church? Pentecost is clearly not a doctrine of the Orthodox Church so are they even Biblical? Look, get it right and research into what a Cult is: anything that teaches you to Worship or follow a doctrine that is not from the Holy Scripture and which influences you or forces you to do anything BUT worship God directly by your own free will. Loving God and being transformed by His Holy Spirit has nothing to do with being in a Cult it is called salvation, she doesn't want to listen.

  10. до сих пор не решаюсь показать этот фильм своим детям – город в кот. они родилис,ь к счастью я их увезла из этой страны когда им было несколько месяцев

  11. Did she just say a cult might be their best hope? LOL
    Also, I absolutely loved the bit with where she tells about how the Soviet Union basically forced Afghanistan to start selling heroin to their own people with the soviet union anthem in the background whahahahaha

  12. Bro the captions. It’s like (man speaking in Russian) over the Translation. This is completely devastating though :/

  13. The presenter is so cute and pretty I just fell in love!Btw looks like the rush government is a loose cannon to this matter.

  14. Bruh I thought Communism was supposed to be terrible. It seems Communism leaving Russia was the worst thing that could've ever happened

  15. Addicts complaining that the government isn’t doing anything as if it’d magically stop them from taking drugs if the government starts a war and make it go underground. Bunch of clowns trying to blame others for their mistakes

  16. Weird to think that there's a very high chance most of the people seen in this video are dead. Really sad honestly.

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