ISOC Q1 Community Forum 2016

ISOC Q1 Community Forum 2016


[Ted Mooney] This is Ted Mooney. I’m
the senior director for community services here at the Internet Society
and I would like to welcome you all this morning. So
thank you all very much for joining us this morning. I see that at this
point we have over 100 participants,
and I’m very gratified by that. At this point what I’d like to do is
turn it over to our chief executive officer, Kathy
Brown. [Kathy Brown] Hello everyone. Good day
to you wherever you’re coming from. I am noting in the box
that we have over 100 people from almost
every continent in the world. I find this day when we get to talk
with you one of the most exciting days of at least
my year. Thank you for being here. First I want to say Happy
New Year. I can’t hardly believe it’s
going be February, I feel like we’re still in let’s go, let’s go mood for
the new year. Importantly in the new
year we wanted to speak directly with you and hear
directly the activities, the concerns, the urgent
issues that are happening in your worlds.
That’ll be the structure of this chat with you. I’m going to
have Sally, since she was so effective last time in making
sure you all got to speak, to moderate the conversation
with Olaf and Raul and others who are here to join this call. I wanted to just say thank you to you also
for the work that our members and
chapters and organizations have done over the last year.
It was a very impactful year for the Internet Society.
We were involved together in what has been in
essence [indiscernible] to me and involved together in some
enormously important governmental struggles and processes.
We have been involved together also in many technical conversations in the form of our
work out in the regions. And I know that
Raul will discuss that as well. And at the IETF we had, the number is
21 ambassadors to the IETF this year, taken
from the regions from around the world. As you
know from the annual report or the annual message to the community, we
have a plan this year that concentrates very
specifically on the need to connect the unconnected around
the world and to address the trust and security issues.
I am firmly of the belief that if we don’t tackle
these two big issues, the next phase of the Internet will look very
different from the principled vision that we have for ensuring
that everyone everywhere has
access to a trusted Internet. To a globally connected, open,
trusted Internet. If we stay with that
mission, all of us together, we know there is work we have to do.
There is specific
work we have to do around these two issues. So that is our focus here in the staff part
of the Internet Society. We know
that there are urgent issues for chapters in their regions and in their
countries that we would like to hear about as well to
support. And we also know that our
organizational members have some policy issues that are really on their mind
as they seek to remain, frankly, global
operators, providers and content providers of the
Internet around the world. So today’s the day to have
that conversation as we start the new year. I’m delighted that you
are all here with us. I want to thank you again for your
presence at the WSIS. We had fabulous help from you
there. For the policy papers that you all helped to get us ready for
last year, I think we put ten out. I believe we have three more now
coming and we need your input for those. And for the
regional IGFs, without you there wouldn’t be. And we
see that as a hugely important part
of your movement, if you will, to make sure we have
involved our grass roots, our bottom-up process in insuring there is
a globally connected, open, trusted
secure Internet. With that I’m going to turn
this over to Sally to give us an overview
of where we’re going and I look
forward to hearing from you. [Sally Wentworth] Hello everybody. As Kathy
said my job here is to keep us on time and also to make sure that we get a chance
to hear from a you will of you. I see now 140
people on this call from around the world. I just
listed or looked at… Togo, Tunisia, Chad, Guatemala,
snowy Canada, and the Congo among others. I know Geneva is on and many others.
Thank you all for joining. This is tremendous. What we want
to do is give you as Kathy said an
Overview of where we’re going for this year and get
your… get the conversation going that we hope will
continue throughout the year as we embark on a very ambitious agenda. So my first task is to turn to James Wood,
who’s going to… our director of communications
and he is going to give us the overall direction
for the campaigns and the brand and try to
get into your minds how all these things tie
together. James, over to you. [James Wood] Many thanks Sally and thank
you to Kathy as well. It’s nice to see so
many of you in cyber space, 140 or so people seems like
a very respectable turn out [indiscernible]. So just making reference
to our focus again, connecting the unconnected and
building trust. We really began to
do more around these themes in a concerted way earlier on last year and
certainly at IGF where a lot of our
messaging and activity really came together. I think
together these themes reflect our deep-seated belief that the Internet is
a fundamental tool for empowerment
in the 21st century and that it will be the
catalyst for positive change in people’s lives through the
creation of social and economic opportunity. That opportunity
also transposes itself to an opportunity for us. We have an opportunity
this year and in subsequent years to forge
the Internet’s future and, as Kathy has pointed out, to connect billions, or the next billions, to
a globally connected, open, trusted Internet.
Before I get to the campaigns which Sally has
referenced, I did just want to take a few minutes just to
talk about some of the core characteristics of our work this year. We
obviously have this opportunity to shape
the debate around access and around trust. We’re looking to create that
impact by collaborating, by coordinating, and
cooperating in more efficient way and
in a more effective way. What we’re doing through our plan, our action plan,
and of course the campaigns that
amplify our work around the organization is integrating for impact. That
means we’re taking an integrated approach to our work, where we’ll look to
intersect our project activity
across departments as much as possible and
wherever it makes sense to do so, so that we continue
to work together to common objectives.
So our collective efforts are really going to feed into
our strategic objective and everyone in the organization and within the community will
really own a piece of this and play a role.
So as we align, the community will be involved in a number of
levels, we hope to engage you on several things, and
really your effect on our work will be to help make us
more relevant around the world, define
us [indiscernible] better, and demonstrate the impact of our work.
Secondly, also in reference to Sally’s introduction, I did just want to put some
of the identity work in context, and to reinforce
the crucial role of that in the scope of the plan, our action plan
and with our campaigns. It really is our
defining framework for our activity this year. As you
know we’re focusing on our identity to help us speak with a stronger
voice, become more visible, and be better known.
We’ve already come a very long way in one year, one
year ago almost to the day, in drawing our organizational DNA to reassert
our beliefs about the Internet Society,
about our purpose, and about who we are as a community.
When now, at this point in the life cycle of our
identity work, in the process of applying these beliefs to our work, and
we’re seeing how key elements of that reenergized or renewed
identity which we brought to the
surface are helping to steer how we speak, how we act, and how we look. So identity is really
what is binding and connecting our work and
is keeping us focused on our
mission, and of course that hasn’t changed, that is
constant, nd as a reminder, it’s to promote the open development, evolution
and use of the Internet for the
benefit of all people throughout the world. In the context of 2016, our identity work
is the engine that is powering what we do in those
two areas. It’s guiding and informing how we go about
telling our access and trust story. It’s giving us the
confidence to act. It’s helping us to be recognized
as a beacon for progress in those areas, and it’s helping us
determine the actions that we want to see as well. And
at this point I’ll give you a real example of what I mean by that. Some of you may have seen it in the flesh,
as it were, some of you may have heard about it.
But I’d like to just draw your
attention to the advertising activity that we undertook
around the WSIS+10 review meeting in New York
last month, in December. The catalyst,
and engine for that, was our identity work. The result of that activity was
that we had I think a very impressive set of digital display
and print ads in prominent locations including John F Kennedy airport
in New York. We also had some advertising
up in Washington Dulles Airport. We had print ads in
the Wall Street Journal, in the New York Times, coinciding with the UN
General Assembly review meeting. And combined with our media
exposure in a number of prominent outlets,
Kathy was interviewed live on BloombergTV, we
had coverage in Forbes, we had an opinion piece in USA
Today, as well as Kathy’s physical
presence in the UN General Assembly itself, meant that
we really, really made an impression. The identity
work that we’re driving, is really behind that as the
pillar, of representing the pillar of our beliefs.
So, as we strengthen our identity further, there is going to be more
opportunity to maximize our reach, visibility, and influence
in that way, including around access and trust. So that brings me on to the campaigns. And
simply speaking, the campaigns are communications
campaigns around access and trust, and
they are a vehicle. They are merely a way to tell our story.
They allow us to keep our focus on these themes and they’re
made up of all the various pieces that we touch from
a communications perspective across the year.
So they help to inform and guide
our presence at external events for example,
across the many speaking engagements we have throughout
the year, through our flagship outputs, reports, such as the
Global Internet Report, and our whole ecosystem of content production
and outputs, including blogs, articles,
specially created materials. It goes to the news that we announce, our
media relations work, our social
media engagement, and increasingly, as I have
mentioned, advertising. So our campaigns are
defined by all of those components. We have two campaigns that map
to our two themes. The first of these is our Internet
Changes Everything campaign, which is designed to
promote and increase the availability
of affordable, reliable access to an open Internet.
And through that campaign
we really have the opportunity to show that the availability of
infrastructure is not necessarily the only driver for getting
people connected. It’s what the Internet enables them to do that
matters. We can show the positive
impact that the Internet can have on people’s
lives, and in so doing we can
tell a more human story. In short, we can shine a light
on the Internet of opportunity. That campaign also has a natural affinity
with our continued focus on women in technology, and
promoting the voice of women in the
future of the Internet. At a tactical level, we’re using
as many opportunities as we can to thread our access story across the
year through multiple touch points. To give you an idea,
they include the Mobile World Congress, a mobile
industry exhibition, which iscoming up in February.
We will be present there at ministerial level talking
about barriers to access, and
women in technology. They include ICANN events. The ICANN55 event in
Marrakech actually coincides with
International Women’s Day. So our [email protected] event will have a women’s theme
that underpins it, and we’ll be doing some
activities around that. It goes to events like
RightsCon, where access and human rights converge.
Also some regional events, Africa Internet Summit,
for example. Of course our second InterCommunity
event later this year, and INET conferences as well.
So, those are just some of the opportunities where
we hope to have an impact and move the thinking on
access through our campaigns.. The second of our campaigns
is Building Trust in the Internet, designed to encourage actions
that build belief and trust in the
Internet as a secure platform for open innovation. Our
trust-based campaign is there to tackle the issues of the moment.
It’s focused quite heavily on Internet security
as an extension of the collaborative security model in thinking,
that Olaf and Sally pioneered successfully last year, and
it’s really there to tackle issues that fall out of the
trust question including cybercrime,
privacy, encryption. So we can really move
perceptions on illustrating the problem and mapping out solutions.
Again, a number of touch points there… some of them are
the same as our access campaign, Mobile World
Congress, African Internet Summit… but there are other opportunities
too where we can make an impact, including
the OECD ministerial meeting later in the year, IGF, and the
Global Internet Report that this year will incorporate the strong trust
theme. But, of course, there are many more ways to
promote our thinking, and to expand on our projects and
activities further, and to elaborate on how they are
interconnected this year I’m going to turn to Raul to give you a more
in-depth look at development. Raul?
Thank you very much James. I’m very glad to have the
opportunity to speak to all of you. We have at this
moment more than 160 locations connected, probably more
participants than that because some places there are
more than one people. That is very exciting having the
opportunity to be in communication with all of you.
As you know the development and connecting the
connected is one of the priorities for the Internet Society, has been
one of the priorities last year, and continues being one
of the prorities for 2016. We have
designed a strategy that is based on four pillars that we have already talked about.
I will go over very quickly through those pillars as some
of the things that we will be doing in 2016.
One of the pillars is the availability of infrastructure. You know that
we will continue doing the work that we do usually with
the African connection. Supporting, building
forums, probably promoting together
with other stakeholders the creation of new peering forums
in regions where we don’t have today, these kinds of
activities. We have been very successful in that in 2015, supporting the LAC
peering forum, the Caribbean peering forum, and also
organizing the African peering forum that this year, the past
year, accounted with more than 260 participants, being
really an incredible forum for having all the community
together, the African operators and the
content providers, and big companies from outside of the
African region, coming to renegotiate with the,
peering with the African operators. We will continue doing that.
We will continue promoting IXPs. At
this moment we can say that we have
been involved with an incredible number of the
existing IXPs in different regions, and we are working in Eurasia,
central Europe, central Asia, besides the Middle East, beside the world.
It’s well-known that we have already done work
in Latin America and Africa on IXPs. This is an
incredible work because it’s not only the opportunity
to create new IXPs but also with building partnerships with other
stakeholders, global, and regional and local stakeholders that,
and with this showing effort, we can really make a difference and
introduce changes in the way that the Internet works
in different places.
One of our other projects for this year is the globalization of our
Wireless for Communities program that has been
so far focused on Asia. We
Have connected a lot of isolated villages in different countries, in Pakistan,
India, Nepal by ourselves. And also supporting existing
programs by other organizations. We are globalizing this program and we will
see efforts, similar efforts in all the regions
in 2016. This is a very incredible project because
it’s fascinating, because it is not
only developing infrastructure but also developing the
communities, working with the communities on how technology can improve
their lives. So it’s going through all the pillars that
compose our strategy. The second pillar
is the building capacities and
developing new leaders. We’ll continue with our
learning efforts. More focused. Trying to align our learning efforts to
our priorities and establishing objectives. And also we will continue with
the excellent work that our team
has done so far in developing new leaders. With the Next
Generation Leader Program that is very popular, but not
only with that. In 2015 we had an opportunity to develop with other partners,
to work in a youth program on Internet governance that
has been very successful. We will continue working on that direction in 2016.
The third pillar is building communities. One of
the most outstanding projects in this area is
Beyond The Net. That is the opportunity not only to empower
communities, working with the communities in finding ways to use the
technology for fitting their real needs, but also developing
projects that can be used as
Examples for other communities to show how the technology
can change their lives. Beyond The Net is a program that
is a, we supported an incredible number of persons in 2015. We have already
committed hundreds of thousands of dollars in the projects that
we are supporting. We will continue with these projects
which are focused in chapters. So it’s
important in both aspects because it’s a way to reach the
communities, to empower the communities, to show how the technology can
be used for improving the way that they live, but also
to give tools for our chapters for being relevant
in their communities. And so it’s the chapters act as the component of
the Internet Society, that is involved in the real, in
the local environments, and so they really know what
is important for the local communities. And speaking
about chapters, and I will just in between
brackets. The chapters are very important for expanding
the regional Internet Society work. We are
a small organization of less than 100 people, and so
the chapters and our members have been
important for increasing the impact of the work of the
Internet Society. We are working a lot on the… I
think I can say that we have changed in the last couple
of years the way that the chapters interact with the
rest of the organization. In the last two years we have organized 11
chapter workshops for developing capacities, this experience has been very
successful but we’re changing that now to a different,
different initiatives. We are launching
in 2016 an initiative, an e-learning initiative
for supporting the chapters,
the functioning of the chapters. We will be organizing meetings
with the chapters in every region, but at meetings that
we call Advocacy Meetings, for discussion of specific
topics, for involving the discussion of specific topics that are of
importance for the whole Internet Society.
We have now the Chapter Advisory Council, the
Steering Committee. There is a new vehicle for strengthening the work
between the chapters and the other components, the other
members, and the staff, and the board of the Internet Society.
So I think that the chapters will continue increasing
their importance, their relevance, within the Internet
Society organization. And the last pillar is
increasing our ability to influence the public policy debate. And
for that I think the main initiative, the
main [indiscernible] is that we will organize some regional conferences,
focusing on the debate about the development
and policies around development, trying to bring
together different agencies and organizations working on
the topic, that are currently working in an [indiscernible] manner.
The other initiative that is the
serious [indiscernible] study and report that we
will be producing in 2016 trying to inform
the process of policymaking. I would like to defer to Sally to add some comments.
The policy, the public policy perspective.
So Sally, please? Thanks Raul and I’ll be
very quick because I’d love to get to the discussion. So I hope all of
you are thinking of comments or questions that you
would like to make as part of the discussion. Of
course, the ability to access the Internet, there’s a role for public
policy and whether one can do that or not. Whether costs
of access is affordable or not. So from my perspective
one of our objectives in this goal of connecting the next billion,
is to ensure that the policy, policies are in place that
facilitate access and don’t act as barriers to access.
So around the world you will have seen in the past,
we’ve done a number of reports related to
barriers to connectivity, and we will be continuing that.
Particularly this year we’re going to focus
on small island developing states and see if we can learn
lessons between the regions on this particular issue. In addition, the notion
of landlocked countries. What are the specific and
different conditions that
they face when they are dealing with how to get access and reliant upon
their geographic neighbors. There’s also of course,
there’s the supply side, how do we get
more infrastructure into countries and how do we do it in a way that is
affordable and open and interoperable and all those things that ISOC stands for.
In addition we have to look at the demand side. We’re
starting to observe in some countries that even when the access is
available, there isn’t the takeup that we
would like to see, snd so we’re looking at issues of local
content, again affordability, what does the submarine
cable market look like in certain places. So all of these policy factors
contribute to the overall environment for access to the Internet in countries.
And finally, I think many of you would have observed if you were
following the World Summit on the Information
Society last year, that a lot of the
debate remains focused on connectivity and access, that
people who aren’t enjoying the benefits of the Internet want a voice on
how the Internet is governed going
forward and how they can participate. So there is a big aspect of our Internet
governance work that is tied to our development agenda in this regard.
So we will continue to build on the Sustainable Development Goals
that were developed last year and
incorporate that into our work on Internet governance
at the multilateral level either globally or regionally.
So that is a snapshot of the policy and the development work related to access. I think
then I, oh I’m supposed to turn to Olaf very quickly
on the technology piece of access and I’d like to open it up
for questions and comments?>>Right,
Hello, this is Olaf from Amsterdam. And I would
almost say sunny and warm Amsterdam. The support that we try to
give from a technology perspective is that while building out that access,
the core infrastructure relies a lot on local communities,
on the community spirit that
comes with the Internet. Our work is mainly in supporting the build
out of NOGs, the network operator groups, supporting the
information that helps technologists to
Do Internet connectivity in the right way. We do that
through our BCOP program. We do that through our ION program,
and our Deploy360 programs. That is one aspect of technology, helping
to support the access agenda, community building.
I would also put in this our
support for building community with respect
to the mindset of open standards development
where we try to… I would say
bring the world to the IETF and bring the IETF to the world. This year
is a landmark in that sense. In my top left hand corner
I believe I see Christian O’Flaherty
from the LAC region. The IETF will be going to Latin
America for the first time. I think that is very important. It’s an example
of how a local, a local community has
developed itself and showed an interest in the IETF
whereby the IETF also showed an interest in that local
community. I think that’s a very important example and
one of the things that we’re undertaking in the coming
year is to see if we can replicate this in other regions,
specifically in Africa. So a long-term agenda to get
more involvement between those communities. And get… build a local
community. That is sort of where I want
to stop talking because I want to provide the opportunity for Q and
A. So back to Sally. [Sally Wentworth] Thanks Olaf. There are
a lot of questions that I’m seeing in the chat and
Ted, if there are others that you see that
I miss, please, of course, let me know.
I apologize in advance if I don’t get the names
completely correct. We have a very big and diverse audience here. Arsene
offered to give us insight in her, in his experience
with the leaders program. Arsene are
you willing and able to speak? [Arlene Tungali] Yes. Hello.
I would like to comment the work ISOC is doing for the
NextGen program, there’s a lot of Indian people interested in IG that
we are supposed to be able to. My experience with
the IGF in Brazil as an ISOC Ambassador
was very valuable because it help me not only be a part
of the discussion but also learn live from experts, all those people
who are, who are working in IG matters. It’s
always good being, following events remotely, or participating online,
but when you are able to go first, I mean to be
there live and physically into meetings it
helps you get a different sense of what the IGF is, and helping you to get
more engaged in the work. So thank you so much to ISOC
for the NextGen program. Thank you. [Sally Wentworth] Arsene. Thank you so
much for that. It’s one of our flagship
programs, we’re immensely proud of it. We hope you can take
that good experience and replicate it in your own country. I saw
a comment Coppins, from London. Hello. You’ve had some comments in the chat about
your experience in Burundi
and deploying broadband and some of the other
challenges that you’re experiencing. That might be an interesting
food for thought for the rest of the group.
Are you able to speak? Okay. Go ahead.
[Coppens Pasteur Ndayiragije] Ok. Thanks to World Bank, we
have deployed around 1,250km of fiber optic, and now we’re on the way to
deploying another 4,000. And you understand when you consider
the state of Burundi, the density of fiber in Burundi
will be very high in Africa. The other thing I was
talking about, the challenges and
issues for connecting the unconnected areas
was about energy and electricity in Africa. Another
thing was to deploy enough fiber optic in rural areas. And with that, if you can deploy some more
community [indiscernible] centers in order to use the
Internet in local communities will be
very important. That is my comment.
Thank you. And I’m leaving, as my country is in some program and I
have to go back home. Thank you.
[laugh] [Sally Wentworth] Thank you, Mr.
Coppens. It’s great to hear from you. There was a question and maybe, Raul, this
is to you or if Dawit is available. Question on
the progress of the access partnership project in Africa
as related [to the deployment of IXPs?>>{Raul
Echenerria]Let me say something Sally and
I will de-refer to our African colleagues. The AXIS Project has
been much more than just building IXPs, and we
have been providing training, developing capacities
in different aspects, so it has been a very comprehensive
process. But, in terms of IXPs in Africa. I understand that there
is at the moment around 33 IXPs in the continent
and we have been involved with, the Internet
Society has been involved with, always in partnership
with other organizations, local, regional, and
global organizations. We have been
involved with 20 of them. So, in the last few years, we
have done really a good job in this aspect. And together with other
things like the African Peering Forum that I
mentioned before, we have contributed to change this
situation in the traffic exchange within Africa. In August
last year I heard from our colleagues from the African team
of the Internet Society that, at that moment, the traffic
that stayed within Africa was about
160 gigabits. We departed from a situation 7 years ago when we started to work
on IXPs in the region, a situation where almost zero was the traffic exchange
within Africa. So the change has been very huge.
But besides that, I was thinking could what does 160
gigabits mean? It’s a huge amount, it’s no – how to express that in a
more tangible way? With the help of our technical
colleagues, we realized that if we could
show that another way, saying it is almost equivalent to
1 million movies per day. So, when we say that’s the
number in that way, it’s really huge. It is creating a huge impact in the
local communities, in the ability to
develop new business in Africa, and also in the prices for access. This is
the situation. And the answer to the question is, yes, there
are still some countries that don’t have IXPs in Africa.
We’re working with some of
them but the achievements so far has been great. I would like to defer
to the African colleagues, Dawit,
if you are there to add something to that. And I can come
back later and answer other questions? [Dawit Bekele] Yes, very quickly I would
like to add to what Raul said. We have
been in 30 countries around Africa under the AXIS project. That project
is almost completed, at least that
period where we are involved, but we are going to go to two
additional countries this year, the Central African
Republic and Guinea Equatoriale, Equatorial Guinea. But,
outside AXIS we have too many projects in capacity building. So, we have
been to Zimbabwe and we will go to other countries as well.
We’ll continue to help IXPs that need expertise,
and we are also going to continue to give equipment,
wherever is needed and make sure they get all the support they need. So, if
you are in a country that requires kind of support. just
e-mail me, talk to us and we’ll try to find some way
to help you. [Sally Wentworth] Thanks Raul and Dawit.
I hope everyone heard there is a lot of progress
on the AXIS project. And if you want to know more I know Dawit would
be thrilled to answer any further questions.
I apologize the chat is going crazy which is wonderful
but I’m trying to keep up. John had a couple questions I think about
communication, if we’re going to… one line I caught is
if we’re going to reach the next
billion, do they know who the Internet Society is? And
do our chapters have the capacity to reach the folks
in their communities in terms of communications and outreach? John,
I hope I’m not totally mis-paraphrasing your question.
Do you want to add anything to what I just said?
[John Laprise] I guess what I would say is that, I just
typed this in, as you know, if we look at the number of
current, of ISOC current membership versus number of Internet
users globally, that ratio needs to be much higher. If
we’re going to be able to have the kind of broad-based
public outreach that we want to achieve our goals, we have to get people on
board who have never participated in something like this.
And I know from building chapters in other parts of the
world that it’s hard, and we don’t
always have the tools to do that, but it’s essential
if ISOC is going to be able to achieve its goals.
[Sally Wentworth] John, I think you’re speaking to
the converted here. I couldn’t agree with you more. I would say, you
know, as of this year I think we have
113 chapters at the end of 2015, which is wonderful, and
we’ve seen several more come online even in the last month.
80,000 members. It’s really in all of our hands to make sure that we
bring more people into this community that can do what
John is talking about. It’s a new way of working, a new
set of tools, but I think, John, you’re absolutely correct. [John Laprise] If I can chime
in, we have 80,000 members. I’m not so concern about the chapters. If
we have 80,000 members and Facebook has
1.5 regular billion users, that’s a problem.
[Sally Wentworth] Yep, yep. We’ve go a long way to go.
[John Laprise] And part of the problem is we’ve been around longer
than Facebook has. We shouldn’t be in the position that we’re in now.
We’re playing catch up. [Sally Wentworth] James, I wonder if you
want to weigh in, do you have comments on this in terms
of the campaigns and communication strategy?>>[James
Wood] Just briefly, as you pointed out Sally, to
John’s question, to a certain extent you’re preaching to the converted here.
I couldn’t agree more with you. I have mentioned in
the chat, everything we’re doing
from a communications perspective is to be more outward looking. We’re not
going to achieve that broad base or that sense of appealing
to a much larger group of people or community, when,
more of those billions of
Users around the world, if we only talk to ourselves.
We need to take our work and amplify it in the right
places to attract more people to our cause, to join us
in promoting and reflecting our thinking in what they
do, and in the conversations they have, so that
cumulatively we can continue to have more and more of
an impact as we go through every year. Everything we’re doing in communications is
geared towards that. We’re focused on building our
relationships with media that will really move the
needle for us and make a difference. We’re focused on building our identity
as really the springboard that will allow us to do
things in a new way, and to get to that point. But,
of course, it is a process. It’s
going to take a little bit of time. But you can rest assured this is
absolutely the direction we’re heading in and bit by bit I’m
sure that we will achieve it
Together with the rest of the community? [John Laprise] I guess I would add one
last thought. And that is, our legitimacy
as an organization rests in part on our membership. We
can’t go to these policy talking shops and venues and point out we
have 80,000 global users, we represent the Internet.
That is not going to cut it. That will call to the question our
legitimacy as an organization. If we’re talking about
representing the everyday Internet users, that’s just not going to work.
We have to get our membership numbers up.
Thanks. [Sally Wentworth] Thanks John. I think
your point is extremely well taken and I think we look
forward to talking to you further about how we can all
do that together. James has a plan and we’re
all I think fully committed to that. There was a question in the chat
about the wireless for communities program, and Raul
maybe you can give us a bit more
information about your vision for how to take that global?
[Raul Echeberria] Yes. Our work on this project
has been focused so far only in Asia. We’re expanding,
we will in 2016 connect at least, we will have one
experience in each of the other regions. We’re speaking about Latin
America, Caribbean, Africa, and probably
eastern Europe, central Asia. This is not just connecting
the people, it’s finding partners for
deploying the wireless network in the proper
communities, building with ISPs for them to provide
Internet services using that infrastructure that we develop
at affordable prices, partnering with the local
organizations, for working with the communities in training them how to use
the Internet for improving their economies
and way of life. Doing, starting new businesses, buying or selling
things, interacting and using the
e-government services. Promoting their products
and their local products, local production. So it’s
a complex project, it’s not only just connecting the communities,
it’s all the, the whole package
we could say, but also learning from
those experiences and as I said before, trying to
inform the public policy debate.
So we are collecting that data from before we start to
work with those communities and monitoring how the
technology impacts, the program impacts in those communities. [Sally Wenworth] Thanks, Raul.
We’re reaching the end of our discussion on access.
There are a number of comments in the chat that we will capture, as Ted promised There
are questions about fellowships
for the MENA region and how to up level the IXP in Kinshas I think
I saw. There is a lot of great dialogue happening
in the chat and we’ll be sure to capture that.
I wanted to turn quickly to our leaders of the
Organizational Members Advisory Council who are on the
call. Scott Mansfield, Cheryl Miller, and Christoph
Steck. and see if there are comments or questions that you would like to add to
this discussion of access and
the role of ISOC.>>[Scott Mansfield] This
is Scott Mansfield, can you hear me on the line? [Sally Wenworth] Scott, we can hear you,
go ahead. [Scott Mansfield] Great. Excellent. I’m
on a dodgy hotel network. Always good to check that
it’s coming through. Thank you Sally very much and
I’ll have to say that I’m very excited about the opportunities that we have, and
we have been given, as the co-chairs of the
organizational members and I’m looking forward to this
year and helping to advise the ISOC leadership. I also want to
say this has been an extraordinarily enlightening opportunity to hear from the
community as well, and the one thing I
would like to highlight is I think it is important that we consider that
access provides these opportunities, but once we
provide the opportunities through these
connectivity options, then that is really where a lot of hard work begins,
because now we need to have the support, the affordable
devices, the accessible technology, the
education, in order to actually use this, and create opportunities
around the opportunities provided by the network.
So that’s one of the things I would like to continue to explore. Now,
thank you very much, and I will turn it over to Cheryl
Miller from Verizon who will provide her comments.
[Cheryl Miller] Thank you very much. I realy appreciate
the opprtunity to participate, and I think that so far
everything that ISOC has laid out is quite impressive, and
it’s very exciting to get started and hit the ground running
in 2016. I just wanted to touch on a couple of the broad themes that
I heard really quickly, and provide
a couple of inputs. I think the overall theme of access
and trust is spot on. We picked up the theme of connecting the next
billion at last year’s IGF and I’m glad to see that work is
continuing. The way that ISOC has sort of
structured both the development plan and policy plan under
moving the bucket of access forward I think is very good. Within that
I think from a business standpoint it is
really important, I think the business community will be
focusing on education around policies that help to better
facilitate investment and also infrastructure.
I think another broad theme that will sort of, sort of ties in with this,
and it’s not exactly related to trust, but I think this year it’s going
to be important to further build trust in
the multistakeholder model and ISOC has always had a key role in this.
I think a great example is the role you
played as a convener with respect to the
WSIS and the IGF, and I think that that separate
bucket of trust plays into the work we’ll
do as a community moving forward. I really loved hearing the
focus on regional IGFs, I think that they can continue
to be strengthened. Many of them had provided inputs
into the connecting the next billion project that we
had at the IGF, which was great to see. Also the youth
IGF program was great to be a part of. Verizon was a sponsor and I hope
you continue to build that. I think it’s
going to be crucial because, whether or not we want to admit it or not,
the younger generation at least in my case grew up
with this technology in a way that not even I did, and so it’s going to be
really important to continue to have them be
a part of the conversation. And I just note with
respect to some of the comments around communication
and membership, and how do we improve that and
build on that – I do think we need to think creatively.
I think it’s really every member of
ISOC’s job to be an embassador, and to kind of spread
the word about the good work they’re doing. And maybe
we can maybe look further to see how we can build out
that with respect to perhaps global public schools, colleges, et cetera.
Because I think there’s a lot of energy there we can
tap into and move forward with respect
to education and getting the word out. I’m sorry, I talk
too much. I’ll stop there. [Sally Wentworth] Thanks Cheryl. Chris,
did you want to add anything from an
organizational member perspective. [Christop Steck] We’ve heard a lot and
I think it was really interesting and it’s fantastic to be
part of that crowd and to see all the ideas flying in on
the chat. I just would want to
stress maybe two or three issues on the connectivity
part and how we can get people to use the Internet.
I work for Telofonica, so you might imagine that
we’re quite involved in that and we are trying to give
access, and broaden access, to people in the markets where we operate.
And what we experience is that first of
all, when we speak about connecting the next billion, we will have
to speak about mobile access, and of course we will need
parts of networks built by fiber, and there might
also be roads of satellite, and other technologies, whatever you have,
but it’s mainly going to be mobile technology
which is going to connect this next billion of people. And then the
second part and that was mentioned already and it’s related to the supply and
demand side issue you mentioned Sally, as well, is that
we believe the demand side actually in a lot of cases
is where we have to work more with other stakeholders, with
governments, to make people aware that there
is actually use of the Internet and they also have the skills to
use it. I think that ISOC has published interesting
studies., Michael Kende has done that, from Brazil,
where you see that actually the connectivity in itself is not
the issue. It’s rather that people say I have no interest
or I don’t know how to use the Internet. And I think this
is really where hit a wall in getting the Internet road out
in the sense that it’s used by people. So the first step
is connectivity but the second step, of course, is getting
people to really use it. I think that is where actually we
would want to reach out as ISOC to other partners, and there’s
many people involved not only governments,
other institutions, a lot of companies like mine and others.
And I suppose we should try to combine here the efforts to
make the Internet available to everyone. That
would be I think a key role for ISOC to play. Thank you.>>[Sally
Wentworth] Thank you Christof, and thanks to our advisory council leaders.
We have a new advisory council this year and we’re
thrilled it came together. The Chapter Advisory Council. I’m going to
turn to Richard Hill and Avri Doria
to give us their insights on how Chapter Advisory Council is thinking
of these issues and other comments you want
to make with regard to the discussions so far.
[Richard Hill] Hi, this is Richard. If Avri’s there,
I’ll defer to Avri. [Sally Wentworth] Ok, Avri, over to you.
[Avri Doria] Thanks. Ok, so basically, the chapters advisory is
just getting started, and we’re finding our footing.
We’re still in the process of figuring out how we work.
But one of the things that I think is very certain, is that we do plan to
get the chapters more involved, both in helping to sort of communicate with
the broader community of users, but also to bring their
input in. Haven’t quite figured out how that happens
yet. Haven’t quite figured out
what the priorities are, and looking in terms of the
priorities that ISOC has already set up for this year,
and going forward, how we actually blend into that. So, very
happy to see many of the initiatives, very
happy to see the focus on rights that ISOC has taken and is becoming
very much one of the leading voices in
that. That is a very good thing to see. And such.
So I think we’re very supportive. We don’t quite
know how to be supportive yet. And what we can actually do to affect things.
But, you know, we’re
very excited to be part of all this and to be moving along. [Kathy Brown] I’m going to jump in and
say how delighted I am that the
Chapter Advisory Council is up and running. I think there’s a lot you
can do and I hope we have a long and
deep dialogue about that. But also the reason I’m jumping
in is to publicly again congratulate Avri for her statement at the
WSIS. It was quite moving and quite
impactful, and just gave me one of those fabulous moments when I know
that we do come together as a community to voice where we
are in that community in ways that are very impactful.
Avri wasn’t speaking on behalf of ISOC but you sort of
want to claim it. Thank you. Back to you, Sally.
>>[Sally Wentworth] I’m going
to turn directly to Richard Hill to give his
thoughts on the Advisory Council.
[Richard Hill] Yes, actually I was right to defer to
Avria because she said what I was going to say much better.
But I just wanted to add two points. From, as Avri said we’re just getting
off the ground, very early days.
But from some of the initial feedback that we’re getting,
that is actually I think one of the reasons why the Advisory
Council was created, it echoes what’s been said earlier in
this meeting. It would be good to involve the chapters more actively in
various activities. For example, when I was
listening to the activities on connecting the unconnected maybe it would be
possible for ISOC to coordinate with the local chapter
leadership when making local visits and
doing localinitiatives and so on. I realize that doesn’t always work
but it’s worth trying. And then on the trust
area, and by the way I share
what most people have said, I think we all agree that the key objectives
you have outlined, connecting the
unconnected and building trust are exactly the right ones.
So I strongly support that. Now I have a personal view
on the trust issue, but I think it’s shared by a large
number of people. We know that we have to kind of
have some proportionate activities with respect to
surveillance, collecting private data, retaining private data and so
on. And I think we’re seeing
increasing adoption noe, or endorsement of the necessary
and proportionate principles, which ISOC itself has also
endorsed at a very early stage. And I see that now in the Council of Europe
documents and the resolution from the
Interparliamentary Union, and so I think maybe it’s worth keeping that in
mind as we go forward, and really make the point
that yes, we do need surveillance obviously, but it
has to be under law and with appropriate safeguards
and due process. So thank you, very much.
And we are, as Avri said, looking forward to really getting rolling
in the advisory group.>>[Raul Echeberria] Sally.
May I say something quickly?
[Sally Wentworth] Yes. And then we going to head into
the trust agenda. Go ahead, Raul. [Raul Echeberria] But just a very quick
comment on what Richard said, and I already wrote it in the chat room. We
fully agree about the importance and
need of involving the chapters more in all of our programs,
including the access projects and programs. Just that.
Thank you Richard for saying that. We fully agree.
[Sally Wentworth] Thanks Raul. There are several questions in the chat that
we didn’t get time to address. But we will try to get to
all of them either through the chat
or here. But we don’t have enough time to get to everybody. So Richard kindly helped
us shift the debate or the discussion to the trust aspects of our
agenda. This is a perfect time for me to turn over
to Olaf, the Chief Internet Technology Officer to give
us an overview of our work this year in insuring
and rebuilding trust in the Internet.
So Olaf, over to you? [Olaf Kaufman] Yes. Thank you Sally.
I’d like to start with a quote that I, or just point
attention to something I just read in the chat. It’s a little while back
by Syam Madanapalli. I hope I
Pronuonce his name right. Syam lives in India, and his taxi account,
apparently there is some value in an account that is associated
with the taxi, got stolen, and transferred.
And looking for readdress, he couldn’t
find that redress. Syam has been active in the
IETF, and still feels that the Internet
is not a safe place. And I think that sort of touching
upon the core of what the trust agenda is about. What we need is an
Internet that we can trust to do our business, to bring
us economic opportunities where people feel safe. And
there are multiple aspects to a trust agenda there. There is a trust
agenda with respect to how people can find redress. So
there is a, you know, how does your loss, and how does
your safety or continuity in normal life
depends on an environment so to speak.
On the other hand, in order to create an environment where those hacks don’t really
take place, we also need to do technical
implementation. So, a trust agenda is a whole broad context going from
policy measures all the way down
to technical measures. Last year, in 2015 we
launched a piece called collaborative security. And collaborative
security is a set of values, is a framework to look at
cyber security and Internet security, from a perspective
whereby policy measures that we take to address the
issues that Cyam runs into, so to
speak, do not impact the value that the Internet brings. It is also taking
into account that security is not one… cannot
be achieved in one place by one actor
and by one principle or one action. It’s intrinsically
on the Internet, multilayered, multifaceted,
and the responsibility of all. So that is sort
of what we try to convey with the
collaborative security complex. Implementing that in a trust agenda, we’re
sort of looking into a number of
things from the Society’s perspective. Having
trust means you need to have policies for trust. And
for us the collaborative security
model is one of those building blocks, so to speak, for
looking at individual policies and bringing that debate forward. You need to have an
understanding of the economics of trust. Trust needs
to be interoperable, so to speak, for lack of a
better word that pops to mind, with
values, with human rights, for instance. So trust
of the Internet and human rights go hand in hand. We want to make sure
that the technology bits that allow users to trust
the Internet are in place. So now
we’re sort of going more a little bit more into what is the future
technology that can support users in looking at trust. We want to advance those
trust technologies. We want to make sure the public
core of the Internet can be secured. So then we’re talking about things
that we try to progress, like routing manifesto.
And then, of course, we want to get a feel of
how secure is the Internet anyway? How can we
measure that? So, there’s a bunch
of activities that we undertake and from the
technology perspective we’re really looking at enhancing
use trust, advancement of trust technologies
such as encryption, such as TLS,
that’s where, for instance, our Deploy360 program creates a lot of material,
and we are looking at online courses
to support that. But we’re also doing work in deploying
DNSSEC, the MANRS initiative where we try to create a set of operators
that subscribe to those values
of let’s make that Internet interconnection more secure.
And then on the higher layers there are a number of policy actions that
we try to take, which I alluded to. But Sally I think you can
probably talk a little bit more about that. I want to keep
this short so we have a little bit more time
to get into a conversation. Sally. [Sally Wentworth] Thanks, Olaf. One of
the things that we observed in the WSIS, there
was a debate over language related to security. And a
number of governments suggested that, while the technical community could
go off and do the technical aspects of security in whatever
fashion, multistakeholder or otherwise,
that the policy aspects of security really were the
domain of governments. And that they should make those
policies on their own, and in some sort of multilateral context.
And we pushed back on that concept in line with
the collaborative security framework that Olaf mentioned, because we
really do believe that, that security, to create a secure
and trusted Internet environment, these
pieces have to work together. The policies that were
created, and we’re having a debate in the world around encryption. If
there are policies that relate to
Encryption that emerge from that, they will affect the technical layers.
Aspects with how the technology evolves with respect to privacy,
or doesn’t, will impact the policy layers, and what
governments think they need to do.
So we believe really firmly that this, our notion of multistakeholderism
really comes to the fore in the
discussion around security. Because no one person’s going
to push a button somewhere and make us all secure
online. We know this. We have to do this as a collaborative endeavor. For us on the policy side that notion that
governments do security, and technologists do technology,
is very pervasive in the government policy discussion,
and we as a community really need to push back on that and show our
value, that we can bring to the conversation
from a technology or industry or end-user point of view.
We are looking this year to build out from the
collaborative security framework what are the policy building blocks that
lead to a trusted Internet environment. And what are the pieces that
need to be in place. We hear this a lot particularly in
developing countries. You know I can’t do everything
all at once but if I can do five things related to security
from a policy perspective what would they be?
And we would really would love to hear from you,
in your vantage point, what you think some of those
building blocks would be. And we’ll come back to you for dialogue on that
this year. And of course any discussion
of security and trust is not complete unless we keep
the human rights aspects at the forefront of our minds. That our goal
here is to create an open interoperable Internet where
people can express themselves freely,
and express themselves securely. So the human
rights component of all of this is quite important,
and we’re building partnerships with the human rights
community that do the human rights
pieces very well, but are keenly interested in understanding the technology
aspects for themselves, for their own personal security
in their own countries, but also for the freedom of
expression concerns that they’re advocating in
their countries. So, there’s a huge policy
component that is emerging and has been emerging for some time related
to creating a trusted Internet environment. and that’s
what we want to pursue very strongly this year in 2016
and be a leading voice on that.
I think my job now is maybe to turn to Raul to
Talk a little bit more about the regional dimensions of the trust agenda
before we open it up for further
questions. Raul? [Raul Echeberria] Thank you, Sally. Yes
we have a lot to do from the Global
Engagement perspective. The Global Engagement teams that includes all
the regional teams and also the capacity
building activities, and the relation with the chapters.
One of the things that, one of the ways in which we will be collaborating
to the, contributing to the security
trust and security objectives in 2016, is through our
[indiscernible] activities supporting the work that is being done by the
policy group, and the technology group.
But also, building the discussion through our regional work to the
technical community, througt the network operator groups and the
regional debate, bringing, trying
to feed the debate with our expertise and, again, trying
to combine the work that is being down by Internet Society
in terms of policy and technology, trying to feed to the
regional debate. And using our engagement tools, and networks in the
regions to promote collaborative security.
And also to use the collaborative security approach for
specific discussions, and specific cases. Finally promoting the
multistakeholder discussion at the regional and local level. Those are some of
the things that we will do in 2016 for supporting the
work that the organization is doing in
collaborative security and trust agenda.
[Sally Wentworth] Thanks, Raul. Olaf, do you have any
other concluding remarks or questions you want to raise
before I turn it over to the group? Well No. But I saw a
question in the chat room from Dr. Shahid Siddiqui about
how you handle a situation when the government itself puts regulation
on the name of the Internet security. So, if that happens,
how does that fit in the collaborative
security model? I think what is very important is that
understanding what type of impact proposed regulation has
on the values, that we want to preserve with the collaborative security
model, is very important. In essence what we
say is we want to preserve the values that the Internet, has made the
Internet grow. Permissionless innovation,
end-to-end connectivity, global reach, those type of things are captured in
the Internet Invariants paper.
But also values like the human rights. So taking that perspective back
and specifically looking at Internet Invariants and
your technical competence, and building your technical
competence into that discussion, and assess whether
the regulation will impact any of those values. That,
of course, is always sort of a
local and a very targeted discussion that is relevant to your sphere. But
taking that overall look, I believe that our
collaborative security framework might help in taking
that… in taking an approach there. I hope that sort of gives you a little bit
of context on how I think of how it could be
useful in that context.
[Sally Wentworth] Thanks Olaf. I want to come back to a comment Richard
Hill made earlier on necessary and
proportionate, because that’s a big deal in this discussion. Richard, maybe
for those who aren’t as familiar with that phrase in the
security and trust context, do you
want to elaborate further on what you mean by that and
why you think that’s important? [Richard Hill] Sure. Thank you for that,
Sally There was a fairly large coalition
of civil society organizations that got together I think it must have been
three years ago now. It was pretty much after the Snowden
revelations. And the produced a set of principles, which in
their view would be the correct balance between
security, law enforcement, privacy, data retention, legal intercept,
surveillance and so on. The website is
necessaryandproportionate.org with no spaces. Just
type that and you’ll see it.
ISOC was one of the early adherents to that as ISOC central and several
ISOC chapters also. That idea has come up here and there.
Some governments have, well, in
fact actually I think it’s fair to say all governments, have shown some
reluctance in adopting those principles I think because
they felt it would constrain their
existing surveillance programs. It’s clear that most of
these surveillance programs in place, not just the one
from the U.S, which is well known, but all the other ones
that we don’t know about and which are even worse, would
not be acceptable under the necessary and proportionate
principles in one way or another. But nevertheless civil society
has been pushing. As I mentioned, this principle is now coming up
in, even in intergovernmental bodies.
It was unanimously proposed by civil society in the WSIS
review, but didn’t end up in the WSIS outcome. But that’s ok, we can
keep trying. And the basic idea
behind it is just what it says: Surveillance, yes, but it has
to be necessary for safety, security and so on, and it
has to be proportionate, meaning basically not
mass surveillance but targeted surveillance based
on some evidence of threats or things
like that and under judicial supervision. Thanks for that, Sally.
[Sally Wentworth] Thanks Richard. It’s becoming as you said a sort of
core part of the international policy
debate on these issues. Nick Ashton-Hart is in there,
he had a comment in the queue about, let’s not get dragged
into this balance that we have to trade off certain things
in order to get trust or privacy. Nick, do you want to
expand on that point? [Nick Ashton-Hart] Sure. If you’d like.
[Sally Wentworth] Yes please. [Nick Ashton-Hart] This is just, this is
kind of a hobby horse of mine, because of course I sit in
Geneva and listen to lots of discussions about the Internet,
mostly not terribly well-informed on parts with many delegates,
and even just the public narrative where, you
know, law enforcement says well we have to have access to your
communications when we need to in order to protect you, and uh, to me
this is like saying we need a policeman to live with you, so,
in case someone invades your home, we’ll be there to help
you. No. You don’t get to live in my house.
You don’t get to live in my head. This is one of the key
challenges that we’re going to face as a community… it is
the law enforcement community has tended to be pretty insular, they hang
out together, they work collaboratively together in the
past. That worked. They needed some engagement by the
justice ministries and lawyers, but
they had to collaborate with each other, and I think we
need, we need more engagement with especially younger, more technically
savvy people from law enforcement, to get them to understand
that a zero-sum game isn’t the way to a
more secure society. And that security issues are not owned by law
enforcement, or by security services, or anybody.
That human rights is a key component, and this really a holistic,
we should want a holistic result. And I have
to say I compliment ISOC, because the messages from ISOC manage to be
congruent, as I mentioned in there, confruent, moral, and
fact-based, all at the same time, and that’s
a difficult combination on a technical subject. This community I think
has a lot to add, if there’s a way to connect
more with law enforcement communities, outside
of the limelight, not at the sort
of level of public discourse where you see so much conflict,
but maybe there are opportunities for ISOC at some meetings
at EUROPOL or INTERPO, or to convene some sort of small
group meetings with people there. Some of the more interested people
from these communities could maybe ask questions in
an off the record environment, and
understand a bit better why the reaction is so negative to
what they, what they propose at times. [Sally Wentworth] Thanks, Nick. Olaf, I
don’t know if you have follow up to that.
The niche of law enforcement and encryption is a really difficult one.
It’s happening in many of our countries as we speak. And
certainly something the technical community is paying
a lot of attention to. Olaf, do you want to speak a
little bit more about that tussle as you see it?
[Olaf Kaufman] Yes, it’s a tough topic. As you know
there are also technical counter reactions to this. The
IETF a couple of years have set in motion I would say almost a policy,
butprobably the wrong word, ore encryption. Make sure
that all the protocols that are developed in that
community support encryption. And, in fact, I believe that
we at the Internet Society, we at the
Internet Society supported that statement. But we are
also working on spreading the knowledge and the word on
how to create those security, and implement those
security mechanisms through our programs. Support of the DNSSEC, support
of TLS in your protocols. Those things do not only
protect you against pervasive monitoring, no, the primary goal of that is
to protect you against criminals. To
protect you against the guy that hacks your taxi account and steals all
your money. And I think it is very important
to take that positive look, in addition to the defensive posture,
that there is a job to do in securing
our immediate environment so to speak. And there
is a lot to do. If we only look at the Internet
of Things, then we’re shipping material and implementations
that are not secure, and we
Collectively have a responsibility there. So, making that part of the debate I think
is very important, a positive and initiative-based
stance, taking responsibility for your piece of the
security agenda. I think that is important.>>
[Sally Wentworth] Thanks, Olaf. I’m going to take
one more question that I saw in the queue. There is a lot of stuff coming in here.
Dr. Shahid asked a question
about what he referred to as a double-edged campaign
going on in India. Dr. Shahid, are you able to speak,
and do you want to describe that a little further. I actually heard
about it on the radio a bit this morning so I think I know
what you are referring to. But, could
you tell us in person? Dr. Shahid Siddiqui Yes,
Sally, I can just give you some example in India what’s happening.
It’s like, you know one side that we call
it a [indiscernible] India campaign is going on. But,
on the other side, if somebody speaks about the situation that is
going on in the environment, either on social media, or
in any format, so that person is
being targeted indirectly or directly through the system, or something
like that, they have to suffer. In every campaign, in
everywhere you might be hearing, on the, even actually
the celebrities, are just afraid to speak about
the things happening. So it’s like, you know, one side
you tell the [indiscernible] is necessary
should be connected all over. But what is the reality? The reality
is that it’s nothing on the remotest area. If you go and
still see there are national fiber networks at level.
But they are not active. They’re not being
used, they are not being utilized. But on the other
side in the media campaign, you just see that its campaign going on all
round going on all around. So I think that it’s
a very dangerous situation. That you know one side
you speak in the favor. But in practical, it’s not in
the favor, It’s like just countering what you want to
say, that should be only be the digital,
on the digital platform, and others are not getting this, therefore
delivering their speeches, or delivering
their expression. So this is what I just want to, in this situation
how one can advocate about the rights of
Internet or accessibility, or that getting into
the Ministry and thosw will all be
disconnected. As you know that 60 percent of the Indian population is
totally disconnected. More than that,
they are even, they are just not having the accessibility, or even the
electricity, most of the villages you go and see. In that situation
how we can think about the Internet. So that is a question that we
talk, we talk, just it goes to 50% or 15% percent of
the population, those who have accessibility,
those that have the readiness, that’s all.
So we have to think as you spoke about, Africa. Africa
is going through the same situation. There are all things,
going, haywire, like it’s not totally connected where
we’re targeting, we are not reaching to that point. So I
am just bringing those into notice. But how we can just
work practically and just get in to that, to solve those issues. Because
if we start campaign, if I talk about individuality, I
cannot do that freely. Because there are lots
of things that are blocked. So just I wanted to just
basically bring the situation to notice, I just need a solution. You people
are expert here so you can just guide us
about how to handle those situation?>>[Sally Wentworth] Dr.
Shahid, I think you’ve raised a
very good point and one that we hear in a lot of countries.
And in fact what I have heard on the radio coming in this morning was this,
was this tension that human rights organizations are
starting to see in countries where,
on the one hand, they want access, but they want that
access to be controlled, they want it to be on their own government terms,
and not necessarily on the terms of the user. And that is
something that we’re starting to see, and we’re documenting
an uptick in this kind of approach around the
world, and tt’s something that we as
a community need to be mindful of. At the Internet Society we believe
in access, but we believe in access
to a global, open, interoperable Internet where people
can express themselves freely. We have to build on
these trust components, we have to make it more secure, we have to protect
people’s privacy but that should not
come at the expense of free expression. So I think you raise a really
valid point, and one that we are all as a community are
going to have to work through and
struggle through for the coming years. It is one of
the key tensions that we see. I want to turn now, as
we did before, to our Advisory Councils to see
if you have additional comments you want to make
on the trust aspects of the agenda. So to our, I’ll switch
it up this time, although we’ve
already heard from Richard, so maybe Avri, with the
Chapter Advisory Council, any comments that you
have? Obviously you’re very active in the human rights
discussions around the world, anything you want to say
on this piece of the agenda? [Avri Doria] Hi, Avri again.
Probably not too much. I mean I’m really happy
to see it taken up. I really do see that tussle
as being something we have to engage in, and
I’m really quite happy that ISOC
is engaging in it, and it is definitely something that we can’t let
up on, as we see more and more of the problem areas,
so, but that, you know, really all I need to add.
I think it was well said. Thanks.
[Sally Wentworth] Richard, anything else you want to
add? I don’t know if Richard’s still with us. Ok. If you want to jump
in, just, oh, the answer’s no.
Thank you, Richard. Maybe turn over to the advisory, the organizational
members, Christof, Cheryl, and Scott. Anything you want
to add on this part of the discussion
on trust and security? [Scott Mansfield] Hi. This is Scott.
Obviously I’ll jump in real quick and say
that I think it’s important for the organizational members to exercise
their networks, to use that as a way to provide
education and outreach to educate everybody
about the importance of trust. It’s important for
people to understand what’s available [indiscernible]
and how to use those tools. I’ll leave it at that, and turn it over to
Cheryl. Hi, this is Cheryl. I think it’s great
that you guys are focusing on this because it is a really important issue.
It has many different dimensions to it. I think
you said something important, Sally, you
said Internet on user’s terms.
And, that’s exactly right. As someone who wants to gain access and wants
to be a bigger participant in
The Internet community, how are you able to kind of
navigate your way through on your own. We do a lot of research just with
respect to our own customers with respect to privacy and I can tell you,
some of the things that I’ve learned is there are
so many demographic, cultural
nuances, to how people feel about many different
things in terms of their interactions online.
And I do think that there are different sort of
dialogues and buckets with respect to when you’re talking
about crime investigation, or you’re talking about broader
types of data collection. A lot
of the points that were raised by many who have participated in the
conversation I think are spot on with respect to encryption.
I think routeing security is another bucket of that.
There is an overall safety bucket that pulls in
items such as child online protection and things of that nature.
I look forward to a really detailed dialogue on this. It
needs to be ongoing for sure, and I’m
glad that Internet Society is taking it up in the way that it is.
Thank you. [Sally Wentworth] Finally,
Christoph, anything you want to add?
[Christoph Stenk] I think we all agree that encryption might be a key
issue around encryption, arorund trust.
But I beleive that we have to do much more work on that. I think it’s
a very challenging issue as we have just said. There
are many different interests involved. When we speak about governments,
they of course, depending on who you speak to in
government, have different opinions themselves. I just
believe that we have to do much more work on that.
Of course, not true that encryption will be the only way to provide privacy, and at the
same time it’s also true that encryption will prevent
any security. So the truth is here
very much in the middle and we have to find out where it is.
And I think
again, I think Internet Society, with its expertise from the technology
side, with the experetise from its chapters, should
really try to build bridges here,
and not you know, being afraid of having an opinion, but
rather try to build the opinion of others as well. It’s not going to
black and white, it’s going to be a solution which needs to
balance a lot of fundamental rights and interests, and
we have to be aware that we should be part of the
debate, and not outside. So I think that would
be just my point to add to that.>>[Olaf Kaufman]
If I may, Christof, I think you hit
the nail on the head. It’s something that we recognized
when we made our statements. And something that we’ve tried to bridge during
the last year, specifically for instance by co-organizing
a workshop to look at the technical implications
of security, of encryption, for
instance in mobile networks. There are many aspects to that and it’s
important to look at those. And, as a comment back
to Cheryl, the various perspectives that people
have, the local pockets of interpretation of
values, of approaches with respect to the security and
privacy, and the social components of that, I think that is a
case for the subsidiarity nature of this discussion.
The multistakeholder type
of discussion that takes place. And I think that lessons learned could
be transferred between the chapters.
I saw Richard mentioning in the chat room that there is a, the Swiss chapter
has organized has organized something around the encryption bills that
are being introduced. And I think that
translating those examples, and perhaps informing other chapters, might
be one of the things that we can do in this debate.
So those were my sort of final observations
from this debate. Thank you.>>[Sally Wentworth]
Thank you, Olaf and thanks for
summarizing. That’s very helpful. I’m just going to put a
plug in for one last project that we hope we
can get the community engaged
in. We’ve spoken a lot so far about what we need to do
in 2016. We have a critical agenda ahead of us. But one
of the roles of Internet Society is to be looking
further out, and what does the future look like. So we
are going to embark on a project this year to update,
revise, reconsider the scenarios that are facing the
Internet. What are the directions that the Internet could be going, and
how do the decisions that we make,
either in policy or industry, or as users, or as engineers, how do
those decisions affect the ability of the Internet, ability
of all of us to experience the
Internet that we want to experience. And we want this to really be a community
brainstorming session so to speak. So, as we walk through the process
of building these scenarios, we’ll be coming out to many
of you to get your sense of what are the challenges
facing the Internet, what are the
uncertainties, what are the things we don’t know but we
think are on the horizon, and then how do we translate those into
recommendations for what we should all do
as a community going forward. This isn’t going to happen over night, this
is something that will unfold over the coming
year, year and a half. But we really do want this to
be a community engagement project.
And so we hope that you’re ready to jump in and
put your creative hats on and think about the future, particularly
from where you sit. When we’ve done this in the past
we get different perspectives from
different regions based on the challenges that they’re
experiencing. So that’s a plug for looking ahead, looking into the
future. And with that, I’m going
to wrap up this discussion portion and turn it back
to Kathy, to conclude. [Kathy Brown] Thank you Sally. So thank
you all for participating in my morning, in your day,
morning, afternoon, and night. It’s very motivating
to sit and listen to the views of our members around
the world. And to keep, for us to keep
in mind the meaning of this word “society.” I have
been always been quite enamored of our name, the Internet Society.
And I, I think I have said this
before, but this idea arose from Vint back when this
whole thing started, about this society is going to emerge from this
idea of the Internet, and it has. It has. Someone
said earlier, yeah yeah, but there’s so many more people on the
Internet than our membership and
that is right, that was bound to happen. The issues around an
open globally connected, secure, trusted Internet
remain for us even more urgent, 25 years which
will be our anniversary next year, into the birth
of this idea, this Internet Society. And you heard a
lot today a lot about what I beleive are the urgent things we need to
do in the present time to meet the
current challenges. I actually believe if
we don’t do this, and we
Don’t do this with some passion, and some direction,
and some activism, that we could see a very different
world, and a very different Internet, than the one that we believe in. The core of our ability to do this is not
the 90 people who are the staff of
the Internet Society. The core of our ability to do
this is our membership. So 80,000 members. Have we engaged them all?
No. Do we need to? Yes. How do we do that? How do we
think about our members, growing
those mebers, and activating them to move forward with us, to ensure we
have the Internet that we want in the future. There
are a couple of ways I think that we’re concentrating on and that we ask you to do.
Part of this is local organization. It is locally
organizing folks to talk about, to understand, to be
aware of the issues that affect the Internet.
One way to do that is on the Internet. And I just, the reason you are
sitting here in little boxes in front of me, is
because I’m a deep believer that we
need to make eye to eye contact. We need to talk to
each other in a way that we realize we’re not just names on an email, or
voices on a teleconference, but that we are real people,
sitting in real places everywhere in the world,
and we call ourselves a society. Together this society
can come together, in my view, to take on what are the issues of
the Internet in the 21st century. We are trying to here,
at the staff level, focus those efforts so that we can
be more effective. We are aware there
are very discrete issues, on the local and regional level, which we
must depend upon our people in those
regions to address. We want to give you the tools. We want to give you
the policy papers. We’re trying much harder to say to
you here, here are the things you need, that
you’re telling us you need, to do the work of the Internet Society.
This year you’ll see from us an increased snd continuing
focus on building the society. On building our
membership. On building the strength of our chapters. On making sure we can communicate
with each other. And, by the way, it
doesn’t only have to be through us, although I think
these community forums are fabulous, you can communicate
with each other, within the chapters and regions, and communicate
across the chapters, and I hope you would do that.
There are so many lessons learned around the world. As
I go around the world and listen to what people are doing
to fight… It’s forceful, it’s impactful.
If it’s focused, it really, really gets things done.
So, what are we going to do? Keep using the Internet to talk to each other,
to organize. This particular application we’re using here is a good one.
Why? It’s cloud based and thus the low bandwidth
issues in some of the places in
the world get dealt with. So you heard people from places around the
world today, and you saw them, that you
could not do just a little while ago. Because of the
technological breakthroughs. I don’t necessarily want
to be the cheerleader for one
particular application, but what I’m seeing is an application that we’re
using that is working. And I’m
suggesting to you to do it, to find it, to get online,
looking at each other and talking to each other. We are going to again
do InterCommunity. Last year, to be honest, we were
just holding our breath to make sure the technology
worked, that we could move ourselves around the world, from our board,
to the 15 nodes that we had, to
individuals, to incorporate individual folks who
wanted to get on, and it worked. This year we need
you to help us think about that
community building, to make sure that our InterCommunity this year is
really about the community, and that it’s community centered. So you’re
going to hear about that. This membership drive
issue is totally on our minds. And
any ideas that people have that are better than ours, or will actually
grow on ours, or are local in nature, I would like
to hear from you Ayesha Hassan is, she knows she’s
tasked with this. And it’s not just
about getting numbers. We don’t want a number. We need
engaged members. And to engage members, they have to get something
from us. It’s not just we get something
from the members. What are we as a society offering to new people
to come and join us? Yes, we are
offering them a way forward. We’re offering them the principles.
What more can we offer them? I believe
this lies in the chapters, because I think it’s in the chapters where
we have face to face ongoing human kind of association,
and passion that is grown and then is
activated, and actually gets results. But we have to think about, what
do we want to give these new members that we want so
much. Finally, I just want to say something about
the fellows and the ambassadors in the NextGen part of
our absolutely essential work
to bring more people in. We must… the Internet is about the future.
And we must, must, must have the future
which is the present, it’s our young people. It is
our Internet natives. The folks who have grown up
with, and about, and around this technology who will
better help us reach other people, and will better
help us as a society to articulate why this Internet
needs to remain open and global. Why free expression
is so important. Why governments need to understand
and appreciate that this technology, this network of
networks, is not something they ought to be afraid of, but something
they need to embrace. Because it is the way that we
are going to express ourselves as communities, grow
economies, become stronger in both our regional, and
our global citizenship. And we need voices in order to
do that. In Brazil I add my voice to
all of those that [noise], it was fabulous. And to have that energy,
to infuse that energy into the Internet Society, the
energy that comes with youth, and
with I can do anything, and with fearlessness,
is what we need now. And it
must be a part of what we want to do this year.
So we’re going to concentrate on things we need to
do in the present, we have our eye on the future.
The scenario planning we’re going to do is enormously
important. And we are going to speak. We’re going to have our voices heard.
I think you are experiencing, more and more, that the staff
of the Internet Society is out in the world, trying
to make a point, trying to have impact. I myself will concentrate
on two big things this year. One,
getting to new audiences, so that new audiences understand who we are,
why it’s important that they listen, and that will
be part of the dialogue.
I go off to Barcelona in two weeks, because indeed
the Internet will be on a mobile platform. We need people to understand
that, and see and understand how it is we go forward. I
will be at the G7, because it’s at the G7 that governments
will again come together and decide how they’re going
to govern the Internet. Well really? We don’t need
them to govern the Internet, we need them to join with
us to govern ourselves on the
Internet, and we have to come to some kind of
Understanding sound the needs of security and freedom,
and the fact they must go together, human rights and
security are not one balanced against the other, they
must exist at the same time. So we must be in these
forums. We’ll be at the OECD, we’ll be at the African Internet conference.
I’m going to Mexico next week.
You will see us out there speaking, and I’m suggesting to you, you should do the same.
Go to where you will have people that listen to
you, and go to where they don’t even know who you are,
and start to talk about the issues that are of utmost
importance. So again I wanted to thank all of you, and
Sally, and Raul, and Olaf, and James, and all of the
staff, Gregg and the tech people who
put this thing together so we can talk to each
other, and ask you to please
stay very close to us, let’s stay in touch. Don’t hesitate to drop me a line.
I know we’re trying to work
out this stuff on Connect. But, by the way I read everything. So I
know what is happening. And I know
we have work to do. And I know that we have new kinds of things we have to
institute and we’re getting there.
So thank you very much for being here.

Danny Hutson

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