CyberTECH Securing the Internet of Things Forum

CyberTECH Securing the Internet of Things Forum


Dean DeBiase: So one of the things we talked
about was consumers, vendors, government, innovators coming together
to kind of foster, but also, in a way, kind of regulate the growth
of the Internet of Things. Pretty interesting categories that we talked
about today, like healthcare, financial services, consumer, games and entertainment,
and in-home automation, and the whole ability to have
data and information about your life and about yourself and your friends and
your family, but not making it overwhelming. Daniel Obodovski: Well, I think it’s great
to see so many professionals in the cyber security, and privacy
space to come together in one place. It’s great
that all those topics are being raised and those topics are
being discussed. It’s about time that we talk about
the Internet of Things and help to protect our
data. Jerry Caponera: I thought it was a very interesting
and timely event. The Internet of Things is definitely something
that’s taking off. And I believe one of the biggest challenges
we’re going to have is I don’t think we fully understand
the scale of what it means. What does it mean
to have everything in your house connected when people
don’t understand what security is, in general? And
then, not only do they not understand security, there’s
not enough people to do the type of security that we
need to do. And so you have this perfect trifecta of challenges.
I believe that what I saw this afternoon, during
the event, and I heard on the panel and the speakers
is the beginning of the foundation of solving that
kind of problem. So I’m excited about that, because
unless we talk about it and start moving forward, it’s
going to go nowhere. Dr. Guy Levy-Yurista: Today’s event was an
amazing experience, where we could have industry, government, personal
people, who are experts are in the field, talk about the
notion of the Internet of Things from many different
perspectives. I found the discussions invigorating, the
points of views that were expressed fascinating, and
I’ve learned quite a bit today. Thomas Sadowski: It was great. It was great.
We came from Baltimore to network, to expand our group of best friends
in the cyber industry, higher ed industry, government,
and it was more than we could’ve hoped for. Just
terrific progress tonight. Darin Andersen: Well, today was a seminal
event, in that I think, in security, we’re just starting to talk about
the Internet of Things. For so long, in the security business,
we’ve been thinking of computers and, in some ways,
mobile devices. But this idea that everything is
connected to the Internet, really is a game changer. So
it’s really to bring the technical people, that are building
products, security people, that need to be responsible
to securitize them, and then looking out for the privacy
piece, which is always a big hot button. Well, something that’s important to us at
CyberUnited is we believe that the idea of insider threat
really becomes problematic when you consider that
someone that’s inside a company can infect an entire
industry, entire set of consumer products, of productivity
products, and not just going after one particular machine or one particular network, but actually
having an impact on every automobile that a company
produces or every aircraft that an aircraft company produces.
The ramifications of this are quite grand in scale
in this new, brave world, which really is sort Web
3. It is a critical part of today’s discussion, and something
that, at CyberUnited, we’re very dedicated to trying
to help with. Dutch Ruppersberger: Well, the first thing,
the Internet was very positive, and it has changed the world. But
as a result of some of the negative countries and other
people that are taking advantage of the Internet, we have
some serious problems in this country. I’ll give
you an example. China, as an example, has probably
stolen over $100 billion from our companies in the last
3 or 4 years. That’s very serious. We’ve very worried about countries like Iran,
that have what we call destructive attacks. Many have said that Iran
attacked Aramco, which is Saudi Arabia’s oil company,
the second largest oil company in the world, and they
shut down 5,000 of their computers. But because of what happened with Snowden,
a lot of people are concerned. So we, as members of
Congress, have to do something about that, and we’re
working on legislation with the business community. We’re
at this RSA Conference now, trying to come together,
as a partnership, and try to find a way that we
can pass legislation and get support so that we can
protect our country and the people know that the NSA is
helping to protect us from attacks from other countries
and also from terrorists.

Danny Hutson

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