Closing Plenary

Closing Plenary


>>Ladies and gentlemen, we will be starting
in a moment. we will be starting
in a moment. Please take your seats. Prime Minister,
Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen. Every good thing has
to come to an end. This is the closing scenery. We are with a very
distinguished co-chairs that
have supported the summit so much. I think you
have seen them working during
the three days . They all worked
very hard. I do not think I have
to present each of them. I think you already
know them. These three days in South Africa here at our 28th Africa summit has been tremendous. I think it has been a
very impactful summit. The backdrop is
quite complicated. We have had political
situations in South Africa,
as you know. We have had
demonstrations , the present demonstrations which have been
very proactive . We also have an Africa that is filled with hope and aspirations. This is the youngest
continent in the world . But it is so young but
if you look at the 20 youngest countries
in the world, 19th . 19 of them are in Africa. We also have a situation where Africa still sees a lot of
foreign direct investments coming in. In other parts of the
world, we have seen a stagnation when it comes
to foreign direct investments. In Africa, it is
still growing. We also have growth
in the economy is in the country. If you look at
the 40 fastest growing emerging
economies of the world, 20 of them are in Africa. That growth is also
needed and we need more growth. It has to be more
sustainable. It has to create more jobs. But it also has two more inclusive. This inclusiveness
aspect has been a very important one during the day is here. Let me start with one of the
global CEOs that we have had here that we have had here as co-chair. as co-chair. Alex Liu is the chairman and
managing partner of 80 , one of those big global companies. Alex, you have
been very active . We know that Africa
is faced with new technologies related to the fourth Industrial
Revolution, trying to cope with this. There are opportunities
in this continent. Your company is
also very active. We would love to hear your console because that is what
you are giving. What are you giving
to Africa on the new technologies and
economic growth?>>Thank you. I have appreciated
being a co-chair and enjoying the passion
of all of you and my fellow coaches. I view Africa as a large-scale
start-up. Just like East Asia was
in the early 1990s including China. And just like any
silicon valley start-up. It is matching the
opportunity which we have been talking about
for many years and making it come
to reality. I think execution and
urgency. There is a need for jobs and economic
development. We are left reaching
entrepreneurship. What I have taken away from the bilateral growth is that we can
scale up even faster. I like the Africa growth
platform idea, getting funding and ideas from
around the world including Ali Barber
and linking them to entrepreneurs. I like the idea of
taking these great ideas about public/private
partnership and mapping into jobs of the future. I had a great idea about
throwing technology being used here, and now being
exported to the United States, so if you get
those ideas to fruition, they could be a
good potential. So, for business
investors, foreign and here, we are looking at how we
can use the technology to leapfrog and eliminate some
of the bottlenecks. There is a digital
trade. If you want to be an into
regional power, you have to go to the
19th to 20th century in terms of trades
and custom. We talked about data. If you want to create,
collect and protect data from outsiders, from
people that have purposes and use them for
your own purposes, you need a regulatory
framework. That will make it easier
for people to invest in the future. Overall, my message is
one of hope but also a call to action. The real message with
the technologies is will you use it in Africa to
control your own destiny? If you don’t, it is
a global business. Everyone is looking
as an opportunity to exploit.>>Thank you. That was very good. An optimistic message. An optimistic message. That was the international CEO
outlook for Africa. Sipho M Pityana . . Do you share
this outlook Do you share
this outlook of Africa being like
a large start-up? What is your take on
the opportunities and challenges you see for
business in Africa in the coming decade?>>Thank you very much. We have had a very
interesting conversation where the threats and
concerns about impact , the possible
negative impact, we have talked about
this more often than not. The good opportunities
are there. The conversations
reflect a great deal on those. There is a digital
divide. Africa is lighting
behind in many respects. We need to move
with speed. The sense one gets is that the Africa
Continental free trade agreement is a catalyst. The African continent . We believe that our countries are
big and can do these things in their
own right. At the moment, we need an African
leadership which is pan Africanist. That speaks and thinks in this way, and more
importantly, acts in this way. These opportunities
require collective platforms so we need to soften
our borders to enable easy movement of high-end skills given the fact we don’t
have skills in abundance, and to be able to adapt
to technologies that emerge and take advantage
of those emerge and take advantage
of those . We need easy access
to skills across the continent , and skills of African
in the diverse borough. Borders draw back on us. If you look at Europe
and other places, clearly, there has been
a great advantage there. This approach
would be one in terms of
industrialisation and strategies. Each of us want
to develop plans even though the minerals
that we produce are not of the scale
and quantum that would justify that. We need to possibly think about Hubs where these facilities
may be shared. This would have an
impact in different areas. We need to think about
ease of movement of capital within
various regions. If the African
continental free trade area enables those kind
of things, it would enable movement
and growth of small and medium enterprises. As we heard here in
various exchanges, this is one of the
most effective platforms for inclusive growth. And small and medium
enterprises that are capable of moving across
the different countries. So, if this free trade area is to be a true catalyst
we need to build around it and enable the regime that the African
leadership in different countries has to do. I am talking about an
African leadership adopting this approach and I am not just
addressing myself to governments that — but to business,
trade unions etc. The era of protectionist
and naturalistic approach is a major
drawback so we need to take a different view.>>Thank you. I want to pick up on
this African free trade agreement as a catalyst and enabler . Arancha Gonzalez Laya from the International
Trade Centre. You heard this question
about softening borders, the potential of the
free trade agreement. I think trade in Africa amounts
only to 17% of all exports in Africa and Asia. Asian export adds up to 50% of all export from
Asian countries. There is a huge
scope there. It is the trade
agreement that will make a difference a difference ? ? Is there a lot of work
to be done still?>>You are absolutely
right that these trade
agreements are necessary but insufficient. It is a necessary
ingredient. I like to think
of the sea FTA as the most delicious African dish that can be produced. The ingredients have
been assembled. The crooks are
in the kitchen. The guests are
impatiently awaiting for this dish
to be served. So the cooking should
not take too long. And what I heard is that the chefs , and this time they are
not the trade ministers but the heads of state
and government who signed this deal. They are under pressure
because the guests are getting
very hungry and very impatient. Businesses are dying , especially small
businesses, to capitalise on the
benefits of these markets. At the moment, it is the
lowest in the world, but the potential is the
highest in the world. Investors are desperately
awaiting this free trade
agreement because they know there are opportunities. What I have seen
in Cape Town in these three days
is a very clear sense on governments that they
need to deliver this as soon as they can. As they do, I think they
have also realised that they should
not forget , not just to focus on
the ins and outs of how you cook the dish, but
how you bring people along. This is what we have seen
in the streets out there. We have to continue with
the education that trade It is not the case
of I win, you lose. We have two give this information
to the citizens so we don’t see the reaction that some would fear
from opening markets. The second good
message that I have heard is around
electronic commerce. There is, as a
result of this, an action plan that
has been put together. In my view, it can
synergise efforts at the continental level in Africa to unlock the
potential of electronic commerce . It can synergise this
with what is happening in the World Trade
Organisation. A big association is also ongoing with
electronic commerce. 76 countries are
participating in that negotiation. There are only four
African countries there. The US, Europe,
China, Japan, they are there. There are only four African countries. There is a better
understanding of the need to
synergise the two – continental and global. continental and global. (Applause)>>You reminded me that I have
not had lunch.>>Get ready.>>There is no such
thing as a free lunch . We have got to
work a bit more. André Hoffmann is
the vice chairman of Ro c he and a member of the
Board of Trustees at the World Economic Forum. I know that you have a
big heart for nature. After this, I know
that you are heading to an area with a lot
of bio diversity. Did nature have the space at this
summit that you expected?>>Thank you very much
for the question. Heart, it is not a question of
hard, but the question of head. If I look at Africa and the particularism of Africa, at this forum, we
have to talk about industrialisation
and growth. The particularity
of Africa and the particularism
of the culture is this overwhelming nature
that surrounds you. The idea , and I’ve had the
opportunity to discuss this with a number
of you, the idea that the
development model of the less-developed
part of the continent has to do with replicating what
has been done someone else is wrong. Culturally, there is
something much more powerful here. Nature has an
opportunity to give you something that we have not any
more, that we have lost. It is extraordinary to understand that
nature is not something that stops you
to develop. It is an opportunity
for development. I’ve been hearing in
different meetings that it is as truly-dollar opportunity
for investment. We can achieve
better results We can achieve
better results than what we achieved
in other places by treating it as an aid to development and not a development — impediment. That might sound a little bit hopeful and
some people think that the only way to be
efficient is to destroy nature so that
you can grow. There is a growth
model that can be participating. There is leadership that
Africa can show to the rest of the world. I encourage the
participants to think about how they can
make their business more nature-friendly , not just because
nature is beautiful, but because it supports
our life on earth. At the last meeting of
the World Economic Forum, David Attenborough
talked about maintaining life-support
on air. We will bring this to
the forums again in six months time. In the meantime, I have
a vision of a strong culturally driven Africa that could help us to
give nature the position it truly deserves. (Applause) (Applause)>>Thank you. Over to you,
Ellen Agler, Over to you,
Ellen Agler, the chief executive offer of the N Fund. This can make a
huge difference to meet sustainable
development goals. Can I your reflections
from your side after your three days here?>>First of all, it has
been an amazing three days. It has been an honour
to serve for the first time as a courtier. — co-chair. We all came together a
few days ago and most of us did not know
each other. Over the course
of three days, I feel I have deserved – – observed what the World
Economic Forum does best. We have become
a community. I have found myself being
passionate about disease elimination and looking at how
philanthropy can work. I’ve also been talking
about social impact and pitching to the
government about what we can do on
mental health. I feel that I never
knew so much about I feel that I never
knew so much about e-commerce and how to advocate
for that is an issue and
the opportunity for growth in Africa. We have all gone deeper with challenging
issues. I see that across
this community. To me, it’s a reminder that
we can all do more. We can all have
an influence outside of our
own sector. We need platforms
like this to integrate,
communicate, get tangible about
the next steps. I can help – – cannot help
but see Elsie in the front row. Thank you for
your vision. (Applause)>>Four years ago, we
were here in Cape Town and Elsie spoke about the
challenges to getting this work done. It’s hard for
us personally. We make sacrifices. We have opportunities. She later the challenges
and said to everyone that she was going
to do it anyway. “I am going to
do it anyway.” I took at home. I have continued it
from four years ago. What are the things
that feel hard that I needed? What are we shouting
about industries? What do we feel
in our own heart? I feel that same call. We can all do more. We can do more for
pushing new models of how we work together. We can work across
the sectors. It is a huge honour. (Applause)>>Thank you so much. The honour was ours. Jeremy Farrar, your contribution
to this continent is vast. I know the work
you have done and you are involved
in many projects. It is great to
have you here. I guess you have
reflected on what the other panel
members have said. Also, your vision for
moving forward in Africa.>>Thank you very much. One piece of advice for future co- chai rs, do not be the
last person do not be the
last person left to speak. You are left with
little to say. One of the joys
of being here has been to be able to
forget for a little bit the horrors of Brexit. Brexit has hardly come
up as a conversation. (Applause)>>I think that there are
potentially important things to learn
from Brexit. I will not comment on
countries across the Atlantic. I will stick to the
country that I come from. As we have heard, we are at the time of remarkable progress
in many ways. There is no doubt that
we face huge challenges – climate change, drug
resistance, epidemics and health, but perhaps the biggest
one of all, even in my view bigger than climate
change is inequality. If we go through the Fourth
Industrial Revolution , which WEF has been brilliant at
pushing forward, and we don’t learn lessons from the first three and
how we left parts of society behind or outside
the progress that can be made, it does not
matter what the elites that everyone
in this room is part of desire or
think about, if we don’t bring society and
the community with this as part of the
development of that with this as part of the
development of that future, I am afraid
it will end up in similar tensions that the first, second
and third Industrial Revolution side. From my background as a
doctor, a scientist, the ability to address some
of our great challenges through science
and innovation in the public and
private sector is almost unprecedented in human history. We have to act. We have to see
the urgency. We have to ensure that
frequently society outside the room . It must be part of it. Without them, we won’t
achieve the progress that is possible. (Applause)>>Thank you. Your intervention shows
that there was still a lot to cover. We will have a chance
to come back. I would like
to go back to Sipho Pityana , the chairman of Angle. Two things I
would like to hear you comment on. One is the question that Jeremy just
mentioned about inequalities. How do we create necessary economic
growth ? That is a pre-requisite
when there are so many young people. Also, we must make sure
the growth is inclusive. How do we combine
those two things? That is the first
question. The other question, the pan- African vision and action and approach that you are asking for – do you see leaders that
are committed to this? It is really about leadership. Those are my
two questions and you have 90 seconds.>>Thank you very much. I think that there is the approach but the rhetoric tends to be
nationalistic as well. I want the following
things from my country . The problem, of course, is that, more often than
not, there is not sufficient skill. That is tipping
us backwards. All I am saying is let’s
build on the underlying sentiment of strong
pan- Africanism . We should be talking
about by an African . Shouldn’t we be
talking about investment of
investments and promotion and
protection of investments of Africans in different African
economies? Then, the scourge of
what we saw in xenophobic attacks
of small businesses in Johannesburg should
be frowned upon, not only by the people
in this room but by the continent
in its entirety. We don’t have that impressed by the
entirety of societies where we are. That is a drawback. That is the point I am
making in respect of that. It is very important. The idea that business comes , and I’m talking about
big business, multinational companies. The idea that you going
to jurisdictions on the continent to make a quick buck and dashed off
as an outdated model. Business has to define itself as a
partner with African countries embittered
of the agenda 2063, the agenda of the
African continent in ensuring that sustainable
developing goals are realised. We must raise issues
that make it more possible for the
African countries to achieve the potential
that all of us talk to. The nature , relationships, the
structure of the business relationships, the relationship driven
businesses and governments, that must
be sustainable. We have participated in
conversations around the role of business in post-conflict sustaining of peace. Business must have
a role there. Business must have
a role there. People must be afforded
job opportunities and trained and able to be
entrepreneurs. Businesses must
not be corrupt and fund illicit
activities that end up propping up was. All of these
things suggest , to the extent that business is in the conversation,
could be a force for the
destruction of the continent when it could
be a force for the development of
the continent.>>Thank you. André Hoffmann, André Hoffmann, you were nodding
actively when it was mentioned that business has to be a partner with African
development. We have two
schools here. We have the skill
that business has a broader responsibility . The World Economic Forum
was founded on that . . The other school says the
business of business is business. So, for your company , we have the vice
chairman, I guess you have a clear vision for taking broad
responsibilities. is not a zero-sum game.>>You really need to
build this partnership, and to come back to this
notion of long-term thinking, it is essential
for corporations. The aim is not
to make money but to serve
the community. I can see that
in Africa. This would be a
particularly relevant thing. If you want to create
prosperity to solve some
of these issues like health and hunger, we need to make sure
they’ve is a long-term thinking in the way business
is conducted. That hasn’t been the
case in the past. That is one of the
reasons I would like to propose this model of a nature-based economy. It is something that will be staying
as long as we need it. That is what I would
see as a model. In agriculture , with the help of new
technologies, we can increase the amount of
efficacy of farming and better use of water and resources. We have spent
a lot of time saying that nature
should be able to pay its keep. It pays for itself, and
the way to do this normally is to talk
about tourism. Tourism is an important
contributor but it is not sufficient. We need to find
other ways We need to find
other ways that the fourth
industrial resolution has to deal with that. The simple messages
this one. Business can also be
a long-term partner. It is not only there
for exploiting and running away. We are here for
the long term. I very much welcome
your remarks, and I very much welcome
your remarks, and I had this discussion
with a number of you. I know that it is a
feeling that is growing. People believe in it.>>Thank you. It is tempting to turn to you, Alex. Some people talk about American CEOs, but you came out with this topic. Andrei was just saying it needs to be a
long-term partner. You also have
those who say it is too complicated. Business is business. You have to make money and then you
will tax them. Any reflections
from you?>>>>I can’t speak for all
types of businesses and the like. It is great to be
a private company. I believe that the
definition of success has to be more
than financial. We have an obligation as
trustees and stewards of the world to have a lasting
positive impact on the people that we employ , the people we could
employ and influence , as well as the communities we
should usually benefit from. I am behind
that approach. I think the small and
medium businesses in particular are the future but button to Lily — particularly
as part of Africa and its economy. We have to make it work. I agree with the analogy but it is a meal that
needs multiple chefs. They can get in the way of
each other. You need to find a way to
be inclusive and less adversarial. Not all businesses act
the same way and not all communities and
governments act in the same way. I think there is a
win/win here if we can share perspective. If I was a business
person talking to the regulators of Africa, I
would say you have to start with reality. We have a lot of
different countries because Africa is city
four countries. You also have different
legislative situations. Not all of the countries
have alleged that a framework. Seven of them
are in draft work. If you want to have
a free trade agreement in 2023 or whatever, there has
to be more movement and more Corporation and acknowledgement that
everyone needs to contribute.>>Jeremy, you wanted
to comment? OK. Arancha Gonzalez Laya, on this more standard opinion that
is shared, 54 different standards. It is not really
internal market .>>Yes, and this
is exactly illustrated in the conversations on
electric, switch has a lot to do with
data protection. If every country treats
the issue of data protection on a killing
national basis , it is going to fragment not create a level
playing field. We need solutions that
will help us build a level playing field
below the national. Understanding that the
systems would be slightly different
but they would be into repairable. There will be ways
to move with rails from one
system to another to benefit from this larger market. There is one issue I
wanted to come back on to. At the end of the day, all these trade
agreements need to be made to work for the
99% of businesses. Small and medium
companies. Small and medium
companies. In these companies,
there is a big category called women and
businesses. Today, they are not in
a very good position to benefit from this
agreement. We have heard the issues around gender-based
violence . On this one, I think we
have to put an end to that. But there are many other
areas where the position of women is not equal
to that of men . This is also in
the economy. Supporting women entrepreneurs are taking
advantage of the continental free
trade agreement. That will be important
for the solidity of the efforts of
integrating trade in the continent.>>Thank you. Jeremy, you were
mentioning a whole science could also contribute to development . Your partnership in developing vaccines to fight pandemics has been so important and we have seen that with the Ebola outbreak. I think you have a
strong message to share. Could you share some of
what you have done and your aspirations in
the coming year?>>This, and to pay
tribute to the role that you played in a previous
life from Norway and what Norway has done
for global health.>>I wasn’t fishing!>>I heard the Prime
Minister of Norway recently described him
as the most expensive Norwegian ever. He has changed the world
in terms of the vaccines that have
come along. What we set up with
others, the Gates foundation in Germany
and other governments around the world was
to try and ensure that money capital and pricing did not stop
the development of innovative science. Academics come and go . You cannot rely on the
sale of these vaccines. There is no market
incentives. We are looking at the
same with drug resistance. We created an attempt
to bring partnerships together to make vaccines
for academic diseases, and we have
been extremely successful with that. But I met this morning
with. We were hearing from Alex and others. I met with a vaccine
company in Cape Town. The University of Cape
Town is a strong academic institution,
one of the best universities
in the world. There are two
or 300 people . It will be too small
to move through the regulatory pathway of
every country on the continent and yet Africa
desperately needs vaccine manufacturing
capacity on the continent for Africa
run by Africans , providing vaccines for
Africans and making a profit. profit. He was a company that
struggled with short-term grants and
small amounts of money in order to move forward . They would be able to
compete with larger organisations when it
comes to getting ready to be approval in
every country. Regulation and trade is
not just about movement of e-commerce. of e-commerce. It is about some of the
things we need today. The regulatory
environment across the continent that brought
together the drug readily to the agencies would have a
dramatic impact on the ability to transform some
truly great science through organisations
like the African Academy of sciences into things
that people need to make health better.>>Wow.>>Can we fix this?>>What I would tell
you is exactly the same answer that we have
a data protection answer that we have
a data protection , on food standards,
medicine standards . If you take a purely
national approach , it is not going
to work. You need a collaborative
effort. This is why
multilateralism matters. This is why it matters
that we nurture the organisations that give us this global
level playing field.>>Wow. That was very timely . I am thinking of you . This is something that is very close in terms of mobilising
the public .>>I am very struck by
the comment on is it business for the sake of
shareholders or business for social good, and I
would say that is a foster got to me. Working with the
pharmaceutical sector, it is amazing how
many times that they say we keep the best
people because of our Programs on neglected
diseases. That is the thing that
helps with retention and talent acquisition. From the mining sector,
it was very clear that when they saw the impact
on labour productivity, if they didn’t deal with
malaria, they weren’t going to be able to
have as much profit. Jeremy gave such an
excellent example. The efforts around
trying to manufacture drugs and vaccines,
having more productivity and
production of supplies. A huge amount of
the health economy is goods and supplies. If more can be
created on this continent, it is important
for growth. We have looked at
the health economy. It is about 10% of GDP Africa, and that
Represents a huge opportunity for growth. And for jobs. And for jobs
that are more gender friendly. Usually two thirds of
women are employed in the health sector. It is more like 40%
in other sectors. Arantxa was at dinner the
other night and said one way to look at
Cannes Africanism is through the disease
elimination because mosquitoes
don’t have passports. We have to work
cross-border. We have to work on a
regional perspective. Especially when vectors are travelling
and changing and the effect of
climate change is also shifting dynamics
are much. Huge opportunities and looking at
Pan African is through that lens of public health, I know the CDC was
featured here this week and having more institutions that
really are looking at things from a system
lends is quite exciting. For my perspective, there are so many
philanthropists and so many actors who want to plug
into that from a real systems change level.>>Wow. You are really good
at those soundbites , I have to say. Mosquitoes don’t
have passports. I think also CO2
emissions don’t. Maybe we should share
that information Maybe we should share
that information .>>Data doesn’t either.>>Since we are in Africa
and South Africa, maybe let’s have Sipho M Pityana have the last word here on this excellent panel. We have excellent
co-chairs this year . Thank you for making such
a great selection. There is so
much at stake here in Africa. So, we need a pan African leadership and action . Sipho M Pityana, you spend a lot
of your career in this environment, so last-minute. Are you optimistic
on behalf of Africa ? Do you think you
will overcome all the challenges moving forward? Is this Africa
the new Asia ? Is this Africa centric?>>We know the future
is bright. We need leadership that
will act collaboratively. It is estimated, by
the way, that in 2020 , 29% of core skills for various occupations
on the African continent will have changed. What does that mean
in terms of sharing infrastructure across
the continent to enable the digital
generation of young people that
we have here? It is an advantage for
the African continent to connect and access
to skills and the pioneers,
innovators and a new generation
that is capable of driving the change
that we are talking about. It means that we should
improve access to educational
infrastructure across the continent. The idea that you must
sit with the planning department of a particular ministry
in your government of a particular ministry
in your government and plan building skills
and training centres at universities, that will take
a long time. We need to think
differently about how we use technology for e-learning, online learning,
world-class institutions on the continent,
in the world. Really top class
training facilities and institutions of are going
to move with speed to access and enable
young people who are yearning for
these opportunities that they can see in
front of them. We must let them take
advantage of those. That is the approach
we must adopt. That is the approach
we must pursue.>>Thank you. (Applause)>>Again, I would like to thank our
distinguished to thank our
distinguished courtiers culture s . We are not done. We have a couple of nice
things that will happen. We’re going to have some
more contributions and we will end
with some music. Please be seated. We will rearrange
a little bit. We will be fast
in doing that. On behalf of the World
Economic Forum and the Prof and myself,
thank you so much for being here and
contributing so much on the substance and I
think we had some fun at the end, even when we are
dealing with serious issues. Thank you.

Danny Hutson

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