BPSTechnology Webinar – Episode 2: Being Safe & Smart Online

BPSTechnology Webinar – Episode 2: Being Safe & Smart Online


(mellow synthesizer music) Hi, I’m Nick Gonzales, and welcome to BPSTechnology’s monthly webinars. Tonight’s episode, episode two, is being safe and smart online. Please join us via Workplace
on our Zoom connection. Today we’re gonna be
talking about internet safety with a webinar
that’s entitled Using Technology Safely,
Responsibly, and Respectfully. Again, my name is Nikolas Gonzales and I am accompanied by Rhianon Gutierrez, Ed Considine, and Mark Pijanowski. We are using Zoom and are live
on BPS Workplace right now, however, if you want to
follow along with us, feel free to access
these slides at bit.ly, b i t dot l y, slash d i g s a f webinar, digsaf’s short for digital safety. Before we jump into the meat of the topic, let’s throw out this question
out to all you viewers. Using the Workplace comment feature, what experiences are you having in your classroom that have resonated with you in terms of digital citizenship and safety? For example, copying, cutting
and pasting, cyberbullying. And again, what is digital
safety, if you think about it? A lot of people just think of it as online behavior or online safety, and there’s a lot more
to it than just that. It’s also using technology to
make your community better. It’s also engaging respectfully online and having good behavior online. It’s using tech to make your voice heard by leaders and by the public. You also use it in order
to determine the validity of some of the
resources that you find online. This is a big one nowadays because of things like, for example, fake news. I hear a lot of times teachers saying, oh, computers and robots are
gonna be taking our jobs. I think nothing could be
further from the truth. We need teachers now more
than ever to validate and to verify all the
content that’s out there, this (cough) torrential
amount of content that’s available to all of our students, and so, teachers are gonna be the
ones that have to say yay or nay in terms of the
usefulness of these resources. So again, digital citizenship
encompasses all of this. Aside from these topics
being very important, all the ones that we
just discussed right now, there are actually hard
standards in place already that actually address
a lot of these topics. What we use for the most part is the 2016 Massachusetts DLCS Curriculum
Framework and Standards. DLCS stands for Digital Literacy and Computer Science Curriculum framework. There are standards in place
already, and they’re official. If you’d like to go ahead
and take a look at them, by all means go ahead
and click on the link. It has a lot of really good
resources and a lot of good strategies to approach
computer science and digital literacy and digital citizenship
within your classroom, especially digital
citizenship because it’s embedded in almost every
single grade level. A lot of what’s drawn from in terms of formulating the Massachusetts
DLCS is the content used from computer science, CSTA, K-12, which are computer science standards. And ISTE, which is the
International Society for Technology in Education,
and they’re the gold standard in terms of
technology and education. These standards were formulated using some pretty good resources. So, just to go through a couple– we don’t want to get too bogged
down in all the standards, and we know this slide is very text heavy, so we’re not gonna spend
too much time here. We wanted to spare you from going through every single line, but we
just wanted to point out some of the digital citizenship
and safety standards that have been embedded
into the Massachusetts Digital Literacy and
Computer Science standards. So if you look at K through 12, the CAS, Computer and Society section, you’ll see safety and security
is A, ethics and law, B, and interpersonal and
societal impact is C. You can look at the Digital Tools and Collaboration piece, as well. Digital A being digital tools, collaboration and
communication, and research. So these two, I’m sorry, these two squares go hand in hand with each other because they essentially, one affects the other, and in order to do
what’s on the right side you have to understand
the left side really well. It’s not just something, it’s not– digital citizenship is just not something you can patch on to your current work. It’s something that
needs to start very early in order to get our
students into a, you know, bring our students into
a contemporary learning and using technology when learning because it has become such an integral
part of education now. Digital citizenship and
digital safety need to start at very young age
and a very low grade level. So you can see this is
kindergarten through grade two, and just to see, just to
show you how important it is, you can see all the places
the arrows pointed out, all the places where
digital citizenship is addressed within these
grade two standards of digital literacy and
computer science standards. If you look at the top
one, care for devices. Second one, explain that password helps protect privacy and information. Identify safe and unsafe
examples of online communication. All the way down to ethics and law. Define good digital citizenship as using technology safely,
responsibly, and ethically. Even to the last one, explain
the importance of giving credit to media creators
owners when using their work. So again, this is something
that starts at younger grade levels
and at younger ages. And again, this is something
that’s gonna be continued on throughout the student’s,
progressing through their grade levels all the way to high school. We gave you the importance
of digital citizenship, now we want to give you
some really good resources that are out there and that are free. We have Common Sense Media, which is another gold standard
in technology and education. Their digital citizenship curriculum is very, very robust and very sophisticated. It is used widely
throughout school districts and colleges throughout the
country, and world, actually. So that’s the digital citizenship section within Common Sense Media, and common sense education
again, is a very useful tool. And then we also have
Google’s Be Internet Awesome, which is a newer curriculum
that’s embraced by, that’s used by BPS and
endorsed by BPSTechnology. The curriculum is very, very interesting, very engaging in that it
relies a lot on a game. Side by side you see here
Common Sense Education, their digital citizenship
and safety curriculum, and Google’s Be Internet
Awesome curriculum. Side by side you can see
what grades they apply to and who can, you know, who uses it. So grades three through
six, ages eight through twelve, for Be Internet Awesome. You also have on Common Sense Education, you have K through two, three to five, six through eight, and nine through twelve. You have the format, lessons,
online game Interland, online game Digital
Passport for the digital– for Common Sense Education. You have, it’s about one
hour for Be Internet Awesome and it varies by grade span
for Common Sense Education. The languages are also available
in English and Spanish. PD is also available. One hour trainings are
offered by both for free. Also, for Be Internet Awesome you can integrate it into Google Classroom, while for Common Sense
Education you get a free account required to access lesson
plans and material. And the URLs are both at the bottom. So you can see here is the curriculum for Be Internet Awesome. And again, you can integrate this into Google Classroom, if you’d like. And here is Common Sense Media, and you can see that the
gray bands are the units. And again, it’s really useful and very self-explanatory. Again, Common Sense Media and Google are two very, very popular and important companies within education technology. And again, BPSTech and BPS endorses both of these curricula. Before– what we offered
you some, you know, resources, and we’ve told
you about the importance of digital citizenship and whatnot, now we want to give
you some quick and easy tips on how to manage some of the more popular and more pervasive topics in digital citizenship and safety that are going around in
schools, not just in BPS, but throughout the
country, if not the world. First thing we’re gonna touch
on is password security. Second is digital footprint,
reputation, and cyberbullying. Third is copyright and ownership. And the fourth is phishing. So password security. According to Microsoft,
there are many ways in which you can approach
formulating a password, and it’s good to instill these ideas into students at a very young age, especially when they start to formulate and come up with their own passwords. First and foremost, don’t
ever write down your password on a sticky note
and stick it somewhere, especially on your computer. That is the worst form of security and someone will undoubtedly come
along, pick up the password, and be able to access
any type of sensitive information a student may
have in his or her account. So it’s important to instill this fact at a very young age that if you stick– if you make passwords and put them on a sticky note and stick them places, people will find them and the security on any type of account could be compromised. Second is make sure that a password is at least eight characters long. The longer the better,
however, you don’t want to make it so long that
you can’t remember it. But just remember, if you
have a 8 character password versus a 11 character password, an 8 character password, if hacked, could be done in a matter of hours, while with a password with 10 or 11 characters, could possibly take
hundreds of years to hack. And that’s one person or companies
hacking for 24/7 nonstop. You can see that the
difference in terms of password security and
length when it comes to making a password and having it be secure. Make sure it doesn’t contain a user name or a real name or the school name. Make sure it doesn’t contain
a complete word and that it’s spelled out completely in
the same case, for example, nikgonzales, that would not
be a very good password. But if it was n1ck6 instead
of g, that would be better, it’s alpha-numeric. Make sure when you make
new passwords they are significantly different
from the previous passwords. And make sure that it contains upper case, lower case, numbers,
and symbols in order to really make sure that
your passwords are secure. The next is digital footprints, reputation, and cyberbullying. One thing to really remember is that the internet is written
in ink, not pencil, and this was quoted in that
famous movie the Social Network. One reason why it’s so important is, especially when it comes
to students in high school and the juniors
and seniors and whatnot, is that once you publish
something on the internet, it doesn’t go away, it can follow you. You know, colleges look
at social media websites and Google names and
whatnot and if anything bad is written about you or if you
have a negative reputation, schools and jobs can find out about this. So it’s really important
to convey the idea that when something is
published on the internet, it’s written in ink, not pencil. It is very difficult to erase. It is very difficult to delete. And sometimes it’s
almost, most of the time, it’s almost impossible. With that we go on to cyberbullying, which is a very big issue in schools throughout the world right now. Some effective ways to
combat some cyberbullying. One thing you have to keep in mind, when it comes to cyberbullying is that teachers are probably
gonna, are the go tos in terms of mitigating cyberbullying. A lot of times parents
don’t understand what to do. And so, it’s really
important that teachers and educators understand some of the very basic techniques in
combating cyberbullying and teaching it to our students. So the first one is screen-shotting. Screen shotting, you know,
any type of harassment or any type of
cyberbullying and storing it is a really effective
way to stop and combat cyberbullying ’cause you can,
when you screenshot something, you can take a picture,
it loads onto the drive in the mobile device
or onto your computer, and you can take it to an
educator or administrator or a parent and the student can say, look, this is what’s happening to me. You can also do the same
thing with screen recording, actually recording your
screen using Screencast or some of the screen casting– some of the screen recording apps that are available on mobile devices. You should also print it out, as well. So once you get a
screenshot, you can actually print out the picture, or print out anything- image that and actually have it on a hard piece of evidence. That’s very important, as well, that you need to always
have that hard backup that you can use in case it’s ever needed. And the last thing is to really encourage your students to tell educators, parents, and administrators that
cyberbullying is happening and that, you know, that
there’s a way to combat it and these are the effective
ways you could do it, screen shotting and
printing and recording. The next one is copyrighting ownership. And the first thing I want to emphasize is what’s called the DMCA act, or the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which is a copyright act
that essentially says, you know, like, you
can’t just go and steal people’s stuff and use it as your own. And it’s also on our BPS
acceptable use policy, AUP. A lot of students tend to think that if it’s on the internet it’s free. And that’s not necessarily the case. You can’t just use everybody’s work and everyone’s images and make it as your own. Again, digital ethics come into play. Using other people’s
work as your own, again, it’s almost like cheating,
and so you have to find ways to mitigate
this and show students that it’s the correct behavior and the ethical way to copy or
to use other people’s things is to actually credit them. And there’s ways you can go about this. There’s Google Advanced
Searches where you can actually use stuff
that’s online that where people have posted content and material that say that their
material and their content can be used by anyone for free with no copyright infringement whatsoever. But there are others that say you can’t. Always be sure to use a
Google Advanced Search to find out these, this type of content if you want to use it. And if you do use it, it’s always really good practice to cite what you use. Always give credit, so for example, if I take a picture and it’s on Google and it says picture taken by Nick Gonzales, it’s good practice to– if
you’re gonna use my work, and I say you can use my work, to use my picture and then credit me at the bottom for actually being my work. And this is also especially
true for fair use. If you’re gonna use it for education, for the most part a lot of the content and a lot of the images that are online, images that are online
can be used for free, but it’s part of the fair use policy. The last topic we’d like
to hit on is phishing. Phishing is when bad people
try to get sensitive info from users through fake emails,
calls, and text messages. This sensitive information
could be anything from an address to a phone
number to a Social Security number to a credit card number. This isn’t some– you know,
this might affect a lot of our older students because some
of them have credit cards, but a lot of our younger
students are being targeted, as well, especially when
it comes to addresses and to phone numbers and to ID numbers. Young adults are actually targeted by phishing scam artists, as well. Now there are many different
types of phishing scams. The ones that are used
the most on young adults and kids are what’s called
whale phishing scams. These are scams, these are emails that are sent out to millions of students at a time and asked for various
sensitive information, such as like, for example, like ID numbers or sometimes in some cases
Social Security numbers. And this is especially popular on Instagram and Twitter right now. Some are so well done that
you can barely tell the difference between a regular
post and a phishing post. So if we look at the Twitter post right here that Rhianon’s gonna switch to, you can see this looks pretty legitimate. Andrew Girdwood, have you heard of Google, have you Google is hiring
people to work from home? Pretty cool, I thought. And then you see
http.dwarfedurl.com 1f291. So again, this looks pretty legitimate, but in actuality it’s
a phishing scam because Google would never use dwarfurl.com. They would probably use their
own URL shortener, goo.gl. And again, this is, and they wouldn’t go about hiring like this. Google’s a very prestigious
company and a very powerful company and they
don’t do things like this. This is obviously a phishing scam and if you were to enter your information, and if you enter your
address or your phone number and a lot of sensitive
information could now be bought and sold on the internet. So this is, again, a phishing
scam right here on Twitter. Thank you for much, so much for tuning in. It was great talking to you today about digital citizenship and safety. We hope you learned something. Again, these are some quick and easy tips. Digital Citizenship
is all the rage right now and being safe online and
understanding fake news and hackers and what can happen. All the great things that are also available online to our students, like various resources and the world of information that’s out there. With all the positive stuff, there’s negative stuff, as well. Thank you so much for joining in and we’ll see you next time. Signing off, thanks everyone! (mellow synthesizer music)

Danny Hutson

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