Architect Phase Community Forum

Architect Phase Community Forum


Good afternoon, my name is John Hrusovsky,
for the folks who I have yet to meet. I am the overall project lead for
this initiative and I will be just sort of your MC and
host as we work our way through this. Welcome back, for
the folks who joined us in March. We had our first kickoff meeting, and now we’re moving into the next
phase of the project. And we’re having what we call
our Architect Community Forum. So again, thank you. If you are not in the audience here,
but you are doing a watch party. Not party, watch viewing-
>>[LAUGH]>>Somewhere on campus, [LAUGH] I hope it’s not a party,
I hope you’re paying attention. Please designate someone in your room to send us an email to let us
know how many you have watching from afar. So if you’ve got 10, tell us you got 100
so we can really build up the numbers. Before I move on to the agenda,
really two main objectives that I have for this afternoon. One is I really want all of you to have an
opportunity to learn more about what will come in the architect phase,
and that’s important. So we will spend some time on that,
because all of you, in one way or the other, are gonna be involved
in this work coming up. And we wanna make sure that you have
a little bit better understanding of that. And two, it’s a great opportunity for some of our business leaders,
not just our executive sponsors. They’ll be up here in a second,
but also some of our ESC members, our business owners,
technical owners to come on up and share the vision, the strategic direction
that we’re moving forward with. All right, so welcome, we just did that. The executive sponsor remarks, I’ll ask our executive sponsors
to come up here in a minute. We’ll go through the architect phase at
a high level from an overview perspective. We’ll have the business and
technical leaders to come on up and talk about their workstreams and
next steps. And then we’ll have a little
bit of opportunity for Q&A. We’re actually gonna have
two opportunities for Q&A. One after the executive sponsors speak,
and then two after the business leaders and project
leads have an opportunity to speak. And then, also, if we do not get to
all of your questions, we will for sure answer those through our website,
like we’ve done in other forums like this. So if there are some questions,
[email protected] And then I’d like to invite
the executive sponsors up to the stage.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>So I’d like each executive sponsor
to introduce themselves, as well as they have a few minutes to
talk through kinda their vision and their remarks related to the project,
thank you.>>Bruce McPheron, Executive Vice
President and Provost of the university. And John, I’ll just correct you. I liked the watch party a lot
better than a watch viewing. A watch viewing,
a viewing here in Ohio is a sad occasion.>>[LAUGH]
>>[LAUGH] A party is generally not, although I’ve been to
some pretty sad parties. And I’ve been the host of most of them.>>[LAUGH]
>>I’m glad I could help.>>Yeah, I appreciate you setting that up. Yeah, I think the two words for the day,
the first, a phrase, thank you. Many of you in this
audience have been very, very engaged to date with
the progress that we’ve made. And the progress we’ve made
is really substantial. The second word of the day is commitment. And so let me put them together,
thank you for you commitment. And know also that we’re committed to
the success of this project as well. It’s one of the most far-reaching,
complex, complicated things that we
probably could ever track back in the history of
the Ohio State University and identify. And when we take a holistic view of
this and look out to the successful end in the future, it will truly have been
transformational for this university. And that will come at the minds and
hands of the people here and the people with whom we connect. And so thank you, and
thank you for your commitment. Now let me see if this resonates with you. Anybody heard of the phrase time and
change?>>Mm-hm, just a little bit.>>You’re all starting to hum, aren’t you? Well, it’s actually also not
just the alma mater Carmen Ohio, but the title that we chose for
the university’s new strategic plan, which the board affirmed just a month ago. And what we’re doing here with
the Workday Enterprise Project is in fact central to the successful completion
of that university strategic plan. So over the next five to seven years, we’re being vague because plans come and
plans evolve. If you’ve done a plan correctly, it’s not the same at the end
as it was at the start. And so as we think about time and
change here at Ohio State and the things that we will’ve accomplished
over the next several years, at the heart of that
are programs like this. And so the Enterprise Project is
something we think about in that context. Whether we’re thinking about
the process of recruiting and admitting students,
advising them to success. The notion of sponsored programs of
nearly a billion dollars, and hopefully growing through time, and our research
in creative expression enterprise. Whether we’re talking about
the day-to-day success of our staff and how they are able to do their jobs. How those jobs will transform in
the future as we give you new tools that actually make you more effective and
efficient. This is at the heart
of the strategic plan. And while Jeff will rightly argue
that it fits very importantly in the operational efficiency pillar,
it really is much more than that. It is interwoven throughout all that
we do, and we have no choice but to embrace that as an enabling factor for
all of our projects. As I said earlier, there’s been
tremendous engagement throughout the planning and foundational
design elements of this project. And we’re drawing that to a close,
we’ve had some really intense discussions. You actually, those of you who’ve
been involved, have surfaced a lot more ideas than we feel we can
chew on, even now in this initial phase. And so we’ve had to make choices and
prioritize. We’ve asked PricewaterhouseCoopers to
come in and actually do an additional, external eye assessment on
the process we’ve taken to date. And Susan and I had a chance
to speak with them yesterday. And I think it will be very, very helpful
to us in identifying places where we put a little more elbow grease and
some places where we think about whether transformation is better done now or
later. So there’ll be a lot of really good input
that I think will help to guide us. And it will be at that point,
incorporating that external eye and combining it with the things that we see
internally, the decisions we’ve made, that we’ll really jump whole-heartedly
into future phases of this. As we transition, though,
there’s incredibly important, fundamental foundational work that
needs to be done to prepare us for those steps so we don’t miss
a beat as we move through here. But this is not a project where we want
to two steps forward one step back. We’d like to keep moving forward and so
using all of our available information to really ensure that we’re
making truly smart decisions that move us in the direction of
success is really helpful and important. I’m committed personally to
the success of this project. This will change the way we operate. It will change the future
of our institution. I was in this room yesterday with the Ohio
State University Retirees Association. This is a much more vibrant crowd.>>[LAUGH]
>>A few, fewer canes and walkers than I saw yesterday. But I loved the audience yesterday because
I was telling them about strategic plan, about our framework plan. I touched on projects like this transformational change
we’re embarking on. And these folks, on whose shoulders
you’re standing, by the way. These are the people that got us to today. And just like the work that they did to
get us to today it’s your responsibility. It’s my responsibility. It’s our responsibility to leave
our successors with that next great Ohio State University. And I’m confident that we could do that. We’re gonna do it smartly, its the biggest
project you can possibly imagine. And so we’re gonna be working through lots
of different ideas, but we will succeed. This is something that is that important,
that we will see some success at the end of
this, and we will have made a difference. And a provost three times removed
down the road will say to all of us, sitting out there in those seats,
if you wake up in the morning and feel a little stiff, it’s because
we’re standing on your shoulders. Let me stop here and
just say thank you for the work that you’ve done today,
to date and thank you in advance for the work that
we’re all gonna do together going forward. Jeff, how about words from?>>Thank you, and I had so much fun
at the Bruno Mars concert last night, I forgot my-
>>His hat is right down there.>>[LAUGH]
>>I apologize. I want to thank you as well for
the hard work that you all have put into the project so
far and also to welcome Susan. Bruce and I both join in welcoming Susan. We’re delighted to have a partner
to join our merry band and our executive sponsor group. And I want to thank Joanne. Is Joanne here? For all your hard work and helping keeping the HR module
going over these past few months. I had the pleasure of attending a number
of the sessions during phase one. Particularly I met with a group of finance
transformation leaders and to be honest, it was a very healthy session. It started with everyone coming
to blows and hugging and then kind of gently tapping each other and
that’s a good way to go I think. So people fought for
what they thought was right, but they also came to realize there’s a lot
more in common then there is different. So as I pause, again this is a quote
that is attributed to Winston Churchill, we’re not at the end,
we’re not at the beginning of the end, but we’re at the end of the beginning,
and I think that’s a good place to be.>>We have some results coming
from PWC that Bruce mentioned. We have the data that you
all have worked so hard on. And if the session I attended is an
example, your dedication and your ability to work together and share differences and
share commonalities is profound. And so we thank you for that because II think it’s on the
shoulders of those you mentioned, Bruce. There are things that are good, and
there are things that are not so good. So some things aspirationally
we need to make better and others we need to just keep
doing what we’re doing. What Bruce didn’t mention
in the strategic plan is that everything in
public has five pillars. What he didn’t mention is that many of
those pillars have either one of our names on them as individuals and leaders. And our names reflect you to be honest,
not just us. We get the joy of the responsibility,
but we share it with you all. And so as we think about ending phase one,
collecting the data and looking to the next phase, number one, we remain completely
committed to this process. And this morning, Mike Papadokus shared
with me the results of the accounts receivable discussion, and he had a big
smile on his face, and I thought, that’s unusual, you have a session like
that and you have a smile on your face?>>[LAUGH]
>>And he said-
>>[INAUDIBLE]>>No, no, he smiles all the time about account receivables. Never because we do it 84 different ways. And to recognize that we can do it
better and we can be better and have a smile on your
face is a great thing.>>And so I hope that momentum continues. Having said that, where the hat is
your chief financial officer and I won’t be your chief financial
officer if we spend a lot more than $200 million on
the project which put in perspective is perhaps one of the largest non
capital spends in our history. And it’s a number that Bruce and
I and Susan as well are committed to. We’ve in fact, we’ve begun to
identify the funding source so that the cash is there to
continue to pay the bills. But that then also means we
need to be confident together that as we sail off into the next phase
that we’re doing it in a collective sense that we agree that
we will be thoughtful. It sort of drives poor John crazy, but
I’ve built five houses with my wife and in our five house builds John knows
we’ve never had one change order and all five came in on time and on budget. So I sat this ridiculous standard for
delivery but the point is how did that happen? Well it’s because we took
the time in the early phases of our house design to agree
what we thought was important. And you all are doing the same thing. And I’m pleased with what we’ve seen so
far, in the sense that it will help us form and articulate a plan that,
as we begin to launch the process of designing the software and implementing
it, we’ll have done it with great thought. And I’ll give you one example,
and then I’ll stop too. One of the things that Bruce and I have talked about is that
as you complete your work, whether it’s accounts receivables or comp
in class or a student advising initiative. We wanna have every leader’s
signature on the piece of paper, for that initiative to say, if this is the way
we’re designing accounts receivable, we deem so and so,
we vice president so and so agree. This is how you should structure it so then let’s have the team go write
the code to make it happen. And if we can do that collectively,
I think we’ll be wildly successful. So thank you again for
your hard work, your enthusiasm and I hope your ready that’s to now move on to
what ought to be the most exciting part of this adventure which is really
rethinking the processes and designing the work day
implementation to make it happen.>>Great, good afternoon everyone. I’m Susan Basso. I’m the new senior vice president for
talent, culture and human resources. I wanted to start by saying to Bruce and John, I actually like the idea of
a watch party because all week, I’ve been thinking that this was
my welcome party to Ohio state.>>[LAUGH]
>>So thank you all for coming.>>[LAUGH]
>>I’m also extremely honored to be up here and to share the stage with
other senior leaders who care so much about the university and
so much about this project. I will say that this will be my fourth
ERP implementation in my career. I know you’re probably thinking
I’m a glutton for punishment. I probably am. But, truthfully, it was really what
excited me about the opportunity and really the reason that I
chose to come to Ohio State. I think what we are about
to embark upon together, what you have already accomplished
together is really quite remarkable. And really is going to revolutionize how
we deliver service to our employees and to our students. I think most of you probably know
that prior to coming here for the last seven years,
I’ve been at Penn state. I can assure you I have left that behind
and I am now a Buckeye, full fledged. But I think there’s some terrific lessons that I was able to learn
from that implementation. As many of you know,
we did end up asking for a little bit more runway
before I left the university. Not really because we weren’t ready, but because there was some
challenges with integrations. It’s a really heavy lift to go from a main
frame legacy system to the cloud and so we just really felt like there
was more time that was needed. But I think what is most exciting
about these implementations is really, as Jeff and Bruce have articulated, the opportunity to really
transform our business processes. And I will say I think there’s some really
exciting work that’s already taken place. I had the great pleasure last
week of sitting in on a read out of the team that was really working
on the recruit to hire process. And really came away feeling
wowed by the work they have done. It’s really quite impressive and
I think the lesson learned for me, throughout these different ERP
implementations, has truly been we cannot treat these like IT or
technology implementations. They really need to be treated like
true business process transformation. Because you can purchase and spend a lot
of money on really fancy technology, but if you implement it over flawed process,
you’ve really not gained anything. No efficiencies will be realized and we really won’t be a better
institution as a result. So I think, I echo my colleagues to say I think the
work that you’ve been doing is terrific. I am so
looking forward to partnering with you, I was incredibly engaged at Penn State
on the Workday implementation. I intend to be engaged equally
as much here at Ohio State. And again I thank you for
the work that you are doing because it truly is an extraordinary lift that’s
really going to make a huge difference for the institution and leave a great legacy. So thank you very much and
thanks for the opportunity.>>Great thank you.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>[APPLAUSE] Okay, so before the three of them leave the stage,
we’re gonna take a few questions, okay. And again, I really appreciate
you guys taking the time, I know you’re incredibly busy but
we really appreciate the time. So, Ann I think is gonna
give us the questions. We’re gonna go from there.>>I’m ready for the questions from
the audience, so raise your hand, we’ve got a couple of mic runners for you. We’d love to hear what you wanna know
from these three executive sponsors, it’s a rare opportunity.>>Hi, and I have a question.>>Great, go for it.>>My question actually is to Susan, and Susan I knew you’ve been here just
a couple weeks but what’s one of the key learnings that you’ve already
learned since you’ve been here. Not just about the project, but
just about Ohio State in addition.>>Wow, so, so far, I think probably
the greatest thing that I’ve learned is the talent that exists here is really,
really quite incredible. Lots of really smart people,
an incredible amount of passion and dedication to the institution and
to their work. So I think that in and of itself is
a great foundation upon which to build, and I think it really helps to ensure
the success of big initiatives and projects like this.>>See I would have predicted that
she said when she hears the words we are she would say IO. [LAUGH]
Because she’s in her transition, that’s right. Well Susan-
>>I’m still in training.>>Knows that before I
left Penn State in 2012, one Saturday a year,
I wore red socks under my blue pants.>>[LAUGH]
>>I love it.>>For those of you who are viewing
online or in a party or a viewing, send your questions to
enteprise-project.osu.edu. We’re ready online to
answer your questions. And I see one hand raised,
my mic runner’s behind me.>>[LAUGH]
>>Thank you, Susan a follow up to that question. What was the number one biggest my
God moment you had at Penn State. An error you didn’t anticipate, or
something you could have done differently. In the whole launch process with
Workday that if you’d only know then what you know now,
what would you change in that regard?>>That is a great question, honestly, and this is gonna probably sound amazing
coming from a chief HR officer who is really supposed to be focused on
all of the people aspects of this. I don’t think you can underestimate the change management component of
what we’re about to go through. And I think the more
socializing we can do, the more communication that we can do, the
earlier we can do it I think at Penn State we kind of took more of a little bit
of a more just in time approach. Because we kept feeling like, if we roll things out too
soon people are gonna forget. They’re not gonna remember how to
use certain aspects of the system so I think we could’ve done
a better job of that. And I honestly, had heard this from Jeff
this morning, and he repeated it again. I really like the idea of really getting
leadership to sign off on things and commit that they understand what
the impact of the different aspects of this implementation are gonna
mean in their individual units. And to the people that
are gonna be using the system. So I would say don’t
underestimate the change.>>Bruce and I and Mike Hoffer I know
he’s here somewhere had the pleasure of spending two days out
at Apple about a month ago. Where we got to see the intersection of
creativity, technology, and innovation. And in fact, the head of their
Apple University was the former Dean of the Yale Management School, so
also an intersection of higher ed. And I can’t tell you, just watching a
place where they’ve implemented all these things, and thinking in a creative,
technology driven way. And seeing how they
behave both together and collaboratively was
an inspiration I think. And, so I hope that that’s where we end up
so that challenge leads us to that place.>>It’s truly the emergent properties
of what this system can do for us. We can’t really anticipate now. We’ll layout a pathway that we have to
build the technology to accommodate but you all will discover things that even Workday has not seen
before as we move through this. And I think that will be the power and we, our job is to create
a climate where that’s embraced.>>Thank you and great question from Hal. Thanks for modeling for everybody else
that’s how you ask a great question. We’ve got one from the folks online. Not sure who it came in
from if they’re partying, viewing or
just video streaming from their desk. Question is, has the Go Live date changed?>>I think we’re still on track. I think you’ll see shortly here
we’re at a point where we need this last step of input to really guide
us on the timing of those next steps. And we’re already very ambitious
throughout this project from dates to finances to the change
management itself. But we’ll continue to push strongly here,
Geoff.>>So I’ll add to that,
the date has not changed as of today. That doesn’t mean in the next month or two as we finalize this work that we may
asses that there maybe needs to change it. But there’s no intention to I
believe as far as any of us are up here are concerned today. But we wanna make sure we’re not, precluding the flexibility to address
things that may come up in the near term. But as of today, those dates are firm.>>The successful end is right,
it’s right, it’s do it right
>>We’ve talked about this this morning didn’t we?>>Yeah, Geoff and I were talking
about this this morning, and this might be another kind
of the my God moment. These kind of dates that
you set in these projects, you never really know
where it’s gonna lead. But these are dates that
the institution sets right? It’s a date that we pick
as a point in time. And I think to the point that Bruce made
and Geoff and I talked this morning. It’s much more important
to be right than to be forced to be put in a box
to meet a certain deadline. So we just wanna be sure all the way
throughout that we’re supporting you and that all the resources are in place
that we can in fact make the deadline. But if something happens and we have to regroup I think we
have to be okay with that.>>Great, questions from the room? Okay, we’ve got another one from online
and it’s for you, Bruce, specifically. But I think I’d love to
hear everybody’s response.>>Is it a bug identification?>>[LAUGH]
>>I only do those by Twitter.>>[LAUGH] Thank you for that. The question is-
>>[LAUGH]>>The question is related to the project, what keeps you up at night?>>It’s the change management. I’ve been through change in two different
colleges at two different institutions. At Penn State I actually had to
reconstruct a college the Board instructed me to change that. If you think changing parking places is
hard, try changing an academic department. And we were instructed to
go from 12 to 6 or so, in a year when the state’s governor had
decided that Penn State University was no longer a state institution, and
didn’t really need taxpayer funding. And so you couldn’t, and by the way,
we then had the Sandusky scandal that came in at exactly the same
time in university leadership. So change is not something
that frightens me, but it does make me think very carefully
about the things we need to accomplish. Starting point is commitment, and it’s followed close on its heels
by a commitment to communication. We have to talk about what we’re doing. We have to be honest. We have to have the highest integrity. Because it’s not about what
happens to any one of us, it’s what happens to the institution
that we love at the end of the da. And so we need to get that right and we’ll
only get it right if we’re absolutely committed to the successful
implementation. Which is going to bend a lot of people’s
universes by the time we’re done, including mine, Geoff’s and
Susan’s as well.>>Thank you, Susan, Geoff would you like to respond to
the same or respond to the remarks.>>Well I guess the good news
is I don’t stay awake at night. I think this is a phenomenal institution.>>He’s been out late at concerts.>>I have so I go right to bed. And we’re in such great shape you guys
that the institution is across all of the different metrics you care to look at
that we don’t need to go to bed worried. At the late night or the early
morning though, when I’m still awake, what I think about is making sure you
all and we all assume good intent. Because what Bruce just
talked about requires us to check some things at the door and
say it’s okay to try a different approach. And, I don’t need to worry about
what happens in my college or my unit and
all I’m going to do is protect that unit. Because otherwise,
you can not make these changes. The excitement we have has to
transcend the work session, to the design, to the implementation. And so if I worry about anything, is can we all put that notion that
good intent is not always there. Can we make sure we can affirm
it together and go forward?>>So actually,
I think that’s a fascinating question. There’s actually an HR expert out
there who’s very highly regarded, well published, who talks about this
issue of what keeps us up at night. And says that what we need to
do is reframe that question and stop asking what keeps us up at night and
ask, what gets us up in the morning? And so, what I would say about that is, what are the kinds of things
that get us up in the morning? And I know it is things like this,
projects like this, exciting initiatives like this at an institution
like this that drive me. And make me wanna get up everyday and
come in and do the work that I do.>>Mr Steve could you share what
you shared with me after your AAU Provost meeting about
the discussion and interview?>>So we were talking about teaching and
learning actually with the AAU Provost. The AAU, the Association of American
Universities is a 62 select public and private universities, so
high company there, to start with. And so
the room was engaged in a discussion of, how you actually drive better
learning in our students. And what you can do to change teaching to
create better learning environments and better learning outcomes. And it always gets down to money. So Provost saying, yeah,
we’ve done this in introductory chemistry, or we’ve done it in math,
we’ve done it in physics. A couple of them have actually
done it in a couple disciplines, nobody’s done it institution wide. And it’s not because they don’t want to, they can’t figure out how to
more broadly incentivize it. And I said well you know we just did
this really wild thing at Ohio State. We actually spent six years
crafting what turns out to be a 50 year relationship with a set of
companies to manage our energy systems. And in return at the front
end of that relationship they sent us a check for $1.015 billion. And so that’s now in our endowment for us
to use to advance university priorities. And one of the ways we’re going to do
that, is we’re able to take some of this money and actually invest it in faculty, graduate students who actually take
the time to learn to teach better. And then demonstrate that
it’s having a positive impact on our students’ learning outcomes. And the room was silent for a minute. And then the conversation turned
away from teaching and learning. And they said, this isn’t the first time
Ohio State has done something like this. The take home message is there’s not
a single other university among these 62 universities that is
trying these bold ideas. And in most of them, if you talk
privately to their top leadership, they’re not even willing to talk
about it because they can’t imagine having those kind of conversations. Your university,
the Ohio State University, is a place where all sort of dreaming
takes place and it’s a place where we actually act on those dreams, and
that can be frightening sometimes. But think about this, folks, we’re so
afraid of the next change, what’s gonna happen, I don’t know what’s gonna happen
tomorrow, it’s gonna be different. Look over your shoulder, all you see
in the rear view mirror is the wreckage of change that you successfully
navigated to get here today, one tomorrow’s not that big a deal,
we’ll figure it out, we’ll be successful. And so welcome to the place that
actually makes change happen, this is a brave place, we take on some of
these specters that scare other folks and we have the ability to do it and
we’re gonna succeed in this one too.>>I hope that gets us all
up in the morning, Susan, Because that’s exciting to be part of that.>>Yeah, so we have one last question,
or time for one last, I wanna say that if we don’t
get to all the questions now. Okay, we got one in the room,
let’s take the one in the room. There are a couple that came in online and
we’re gonna either address those in the next Q&A if we can, or the answers
will absolutely be posted online. So let’s take the question in the room and
we’ll go from there.>>The pressure. What you just said actually kinda segues
nicely into my question, so thank you. I was wondering about the, a lot of what
we did in discovery was figuring out where we have pain points and
moving forward with key decisions. And so I was just curious about the
timeline of kind of dispositioning those key decisions and actually knowing
what the next steps are with those.>>I think we’re actually gonna hear
a little bit about some of that as we move into the next set of slides,
so it may actually be a great segue. Susan wasn’t here yet, but one of the
things Geoff and I worked on with John was taking all of the suggestions and
actually trying to triage them in a way, put them into buckets if you will,
so that there are some things that we need to do simply because
we’re implementing Workday as a product. There are some things we can choose to do
because we’re implementing Workday, and there are other things
that we would aspire to do at a time when we’re changing so
many other processes. And so we kinda categorized them one,
two, and three and then tried to make some
decisions about the steps we would take. That doesn’t preclude necessarily doing
some of the things that are on the horizon still in the context of the timeline,
but it also gives us some guidance and scope for what we intend to accomplish
through the Enterprise project itself. There’s a lot of change that we’re going
to want to accomplish here, and the trick will be as we go through the next four,
five, six years, actually figuring out the sequencing and contingencies of
all of those different decisions.>>And if I recall, Bruce, most of what you all
recommended is in the path forward. But there were some things that quite
frankly we took a look at together and said you know what, that would be nice to have but we don’t
think that’s a key priority right now, or we don’t think we can afford that, or it’s
not as critical as these other things. And so we made, we did you’ll see, make some decisions that some things
were better off to be revisited later so that we could really be successful on
those core activities, the must dos and the really importants to have that
will really transform the institution.>>Thank you for the great questions,
and thank you to our executive sponsors.>>Yeah, thanks to all of you.>>Thank you.
>>[CROSSTALK] appreciate you being here.>>You’re all doing the heavy lifting.>>Thank you.
>>Thank you very much.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Thank you very much, let’s give them another round of applause.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Back in March they were the hit, and now they’re still the hit as we
move into September in this phase, so again, thank you. Okay, so let’s bring Beth, where’s Beth? Beth come on up here,
she’s gonna join me, we’re gonna now talk a little bit more detail
within the architect phase. Thank you, Geoff. And before we do that, Bill, I wanna share
this slide with you because there’s a couple key things that are going on here
that are really important for everyone in the audience, for
the viewing parties to absorb. And that is this is a combination of
business transformation and also system implementation, we’ve talked about that,
I think that point was made once again by our executive sponsors, and it will
allow us to enable the strategic plan. So that first kind of statement up
at the top drives us every day, that gets us up in the morning. By the way, where’s Anne at? When you asked the question about what
keeps you up at night I felt a little, only up here because they were asking all the
questions, but what keeps me up at night is a new puppy, we have a little
puppy that keeps me up at night. Okay so here’s our, this is important,
modern systems Workday is very modern, right, that’s a key aspect of really what
our tagline is, what we’re driving toward. More efficient processes, you heard that,
and then a better work day, that’s a little play on the term work day. But if you look at those four key points
below that, advancing our mission, enabling the strategic plan, driving
consistency across our business processes, and effective decision making,
those are really part and parcel to what we´re trying to accomplish. If you don´t already know this our
scope is incorporating all of finance, all of HR, all of payroll, student, and the technical areas that are impacted
by those businesses processes. Go ahead. Our timeline,
there was a question on the timeline, as our executive sponsors mentioned that
hasn’t changed, we are moving forward with July 19 for core HR,
payroll, and also financials. The one confirmation we made during
the plan and foundational design phase was student,
student is projected to go live starting on the academic calendar over
an academic year in July of 2020. So that is our current schedule
at this moment in time, just wanted to make sure we
communicated that within this forum. Okay, couple key points. We brought this slide up back in March,
and we talked a little bit about what planning was, what architect,
config and prototype, so forth. So this is actually the same slide that
we utilized during the March discussion, so I’m bringing it back because
this ties us back to the architect phase which we are moving into. So I’m not gonna reiterate
all these points, but I wanna mention a couple points
here that I think are important. This is a new build for Ohio State
from a configuration perspective but this is not a custom build, and
one of the things that we found out during that plan and foundational
design phase There were several. People chose develop application. Especially in the student area. But it wasn’t just applicable in the
student area where we identified those. And those are not all gonna
be covered by work day. So, one of the things we’re gonna have
to figure out is how does that get also completed, the ones within our scope,
within the time frame that we have. So it’s not custom, but we have to address some
functionality that’s outside of workday. And then lastly on this page and
then we’ll move on, we have to be able to be
flexible to meet future needs. So as we work our way through this,
this architect phase, and insuring that we are doing it in a way
where we are creating the flexibility we need to adopt more enhancements
that Workday implements and develops in their
software as time goes on. Okay, so where are we with our
construction, to use that analogy? We have done the work as it relates
to plan and foundational design. And, again, a lot of people, if not everybody in this room,
was involved in that in some way. As our executive sponsors mention, we’re
having an independent assessment from PWC. It is being conducted right now. When that wraps up,
we’ll take the learnings from that and incorporate that into the deliverable
to wrap up that phase. We have initiated the core
foundational architect phase task and that is in process. We plan on having architect end at
the end of February of next year for finance and HR for release one. However, student will go on
all the way through 2018, and let me explain why that’s the case. The first part of,
it’s important to do Architect with student part of that process, because
we’re gonna be implementing student, and as you all know,
Workday is an integrated application. So it’s really important at any
touch points that student has with HR in financials
are incorporated into architect. However, after that’s wrapped up,
we also need to then dive deeper into student for
the rest of their architect phase. So again,
it’ll extend throughout the rest of 18 and then lines up with their goal live
in the July of 2020 timeframe. Couple quick goals on architect. We are going to design those
future state business processes. Beth will talk a little bit about what
we call our solution design package. She’ll talk a little bit about
what that is in a few minutes. We’re also gonna define. We’ve already started, but
we’re gonna finalize and define our report in
analytics requirements. We’re gonna finalize our technology
requirements that are necessary. Not just our business process and
functional requirements. We’re gonna create any policy or service delivery recommendations
that are necessary. Again the executive sponsors mention
that there is gonna be a lot of change. Some of that change actually is reflective
in policies that are gonna have to change. So we actually have a whole work stream
within our project that’s focused on that. So I bring that to the attention
from an architect perspective because this is where this will
get addressed and identified, and then resolved and finalized. And then lastly we will confirm,
we have approximately, I know the keeper’s not here, but 437 systems is on our list of systems that
are being impacted by what we’re doing. So just try and take a deep breath and
think about that. There are 430, sorry the number’s
probably slightly different now. But last week when we talked,
it was 437 systems that are currently utilized by the university
that will be impacted in some way by our implementation, and we have got to figure
out what’s gonna happen with all those. So that’s what that last point is. Some are gonna continue to exist,
and we’re gonna integrate in. Some can go away because
they’re not necessary. So that’s a very, very critical function
and critical effort that the technical team is leading as they work
our way through this phase. So in a nutshell,
that’s kind of the goals of architect. Did you have anything to add to that?>>Nope, I think you’ve covered it,
and I’ll cover it on the next slide. Yep.
>>Okay, go ahead. So, as you can imagine, and
I think most of you are very well aware, because you are involved in all of this. There are a lot of activities and
deliverables in this phase. And this just reflects a high level
sampling of some of those key activities and deliverables by
our various project work streams. I’m not gonna go through all of them, but I do wanna point out just a couple
to give you a flavor for it. So of course,
under the business process work stream, that really the heart of what’s being done
on this phase are those solution designs. So taking the great work from the plan
of foundational design stage, each end to end business process is gonna
be looked at in much greater detail, mapped out, discussed,
all through a series of design workshops, deep dive sessions, and
even some prototyping. So that really is actually gonna come up
with the blueprint if we use our house analogy, the blueprint for
the build of our house. And I’ll show you an example of
that solution design package and the draft version of
that in just a moment. Moving over. It’s under technical, but
this really impacts all work streams, and that is the configuration tenant. A tenant is a Workday unique terminology. But you can think of it again,
with our house analogy, you can kind of think of it as
an Ohio State specific home. In a tightly knit community of homes. So this will be the OSU instance
where we’ll be building out the configurations,
we’ll be loading your legacy data. We’re gonna be building that as we go. And at the end of this architect phase, we
will have a completed configuration tenant that will be used for the next phase,
which is configuration and prototype. You can expect that it’ll be about
75 to 80% complete in terms of the business processes and
we’ll use the iterative activities in the next phase
to really finalize the tenant. And then finally, under the organizational
change management area one of the key activities that’s already
underway is the learning approach. So we’re not actually developing
the training just yet, but what we are doing is spending a fair bit of time,
taking a look at all the various users and different targeted instances and
understanding. How they like to learn, what the best
way to train them on a system and then new processes. And so we’ll be,
whether they like to learn online, or in instructor like classroom or
even a hybrid approach. So we’ll be laying out that approach
that will execute late on the project. Okay, next slide. So as I mentioned, just to give you
a flavor these next two slides, this is still very much in draft format. In fact we had a great meeting this
morning with some good feedback on what the solution design
package is gonna look like. So essentially we are looking to have a
single one stop shop comprehensive summary of all of those end to end business
processes and detailed work flows. So then,
our work day team can take this summary, the approved final solution designs,
and configure the system appropriately. This is also going to include
functional technical requirements, the integration requirements,
and then as John mentioned, we’re going to be looking at all
those systems and documenting. How we’re gonna disposition each of those,
and then the final point is around the key design document,
sorry key design decisions. The options will be listed and the decisions will be made
throughout this architect phase. And then the next slide, this is just the
visual of of the detailed process flow. So we are looking at not only how this
system is gonna be configured, but also the processes around it. So things that happen outside
of work day in our system.>>Great. So I wanna briefly mention a couple items. In a few minutes we’re gonna
have the business leaders and technical leaders come on up from the
university as well as from the project. Before we do that though, there are
several themes that came out of the plan in foundational design that cut
across all the areas of HR, payroll, finance, student, and enablement. And they are,
I’ll just kinda quickly go through these. That we are, as much as we possibly can,
going to create standard processes across the whole university
community including the med center. As well as the academic side
of the university side. And one of the, that is a heavy
lift in itself right there. But we’re gonna try to accomplish
as much as we possibly can because of the ability to streamline
operations over a long period of time. We’re going to automate as many processes
that are are manual today as possible. We’re gonna integrate university
wide data with common definitions. I would imagine that most people in
this room are familiar with the FDM is. That’s our foundation data model. That is a really important
aspect of this implementation, that is one data model that’s gonna be
utilized across all the applications of work day on a regular basis and
those definitions are gonna be consistent. So we will not have the ability to have a
field that’s defined one way for a certain part of the organization and another way
for another part of the organization. That will create efficiencies
significantly from a reporting and an analytics perspective. And then lastly, and this is impactful
to all aspects of our implementation. There will be greater options for
employees, managers, especially students to conduct
self-service activities. As a matter of fact, we, myself and Anne, had an opportunity to speak to
the Senate Steering Committee last week. And in that discussion with them,
there were several students in that room. And we talked about their daily
experience they have with their phones. And we translated that into
the experience they will have as students utilizing
the work day application. Now unfortunately most of were juniors and
seniors who are gonna be gone, but for the freshman and
sophomores they’ll be here for that. But the point is there’ll be many more
options to utilize your iPads and your mobile devices than before. Go ahead and go. Our work is organized, in these
interconnected work streams of student, HR, payroll, finance, and enablement. And we use the term enablement
instead of technology or data, because we are enabling the whole aspect. That’s why it goes underneath, across
those the functional areas because they’re enabling the functional
areas to do their job through the ENABLEMENT Technology
Data Security and so forth. So as we bring up the folks and I think
we’re ready to, I think the next be able, the folks that come on up to the stage. We’ll have them get organized, and then we’ve got a couple videos
that we’re gonna be going through, as well as each of them being able to
speak through their specific areas. Okay. [MUSIC]>>Hi I’m Jack Miner,
I’m University Registrar and Executive Director of Enrollment Services. I’m here today to talk a little
bit about the enterprise project. The Enterprise Project at its
root is an opportunity for Ohio State to bring modern technology. And leverage our technology resources
in order to better serve our students. It’ll provide a mobile adaptive
environment for our students. And it will also provide
an opportunity for our students to best engage with the
resources that we provide at Ohio State. One of the things that we did
collaboratively as an institution in working through the Enterprise project, is
developing a series of guiding principles. Those guiding principles are on
your screen right now, but I want to talk a little bit
about how we developed those and how those will actually be actualized for
the project. We developed those in working with
students, university leadership, faculty and staff and
various senate committees across campus. The opportunity was
really one to think about what is at the root of what we’re trying
to accomplish with the enterprise project? I want to talk a little bit about
one of those guiding principles around the academic advising. With academic advising one of the things
we’ll be able to do is specifically provide students an opportunity
to plan out their degree for the four years that they are here. And show them how individual changes to
that degree plan, including substituting classes can impact their time to
degree and their student debt ratio. For an institution,
we’re also able to mine that data and able to better plan what are the interests
of our students and how can we better plan a course offering pattern for them over
the time that they’re at Ohio State? I hope that you’ll join me in making
the Enterprise Project a success and helping to better serve our students,
thanks. [MUSIC]>>Thanks, Jack, that was wonderful. I don’t think we need to say anything. We can probably stand over here and
just smile, right? But I know John wanted
us to say something. So what I’ll do [LAUGH]. He’s my boss, performance review and yeah.>>[LAUGH]
>>I’m not going to read through the slide but I wanted to highlight a few things,
right? So the last phase, the planning
foundation phase, what we did was take a look into all our business processes for
student like we had, there are 93 of them, we had conducted 160 sessions
to go through our processes. What we looked at, do we need the process? Yes. Can we improve the process? Yes. Right, do we have gaps with work day? In certain cases we do, so we took all
of those gaps, worked with work day and worked with a product group and
we are still working on that. So this phase, as John pointed out,
student has a little longer, right, that could take a little longer. You’re not going to waste the time,
you’re going to go deep in some of those sessions and
design it so we can really work through. I know John and Von is gonna talk a little
about business process transformation on two of them, so I’ll not waste anymore
time, I’ll hand over to John, talk to us.>>I am part of the team
charged with enhancing, with transforming academic advising for
undergraduates. I am speaking for
that team when I say that we believe high quality academic advising
is important to student success. And to an exceptional student experience. We know that advisors are committed
to helping students, but we are working to redesign the processes around advising to improve how
advisors are able to support students. As one component of our analysis,
we are identifying opportunities for using Workday’s technology to better
address the needs of our students and to assist the efforts of advisors. We are planning to provide more
coordinated and proactive engagement with the students the better to
support their success, once again. From first contact through and
beyond their graduation, Vern.>>Thank you, good afternoon everyone. My name is Vern Granger. I represent enrollment services but
also the student work stream. As I think about this project and some of the things that I’m looking for,
I think about how great it would be for us to better utilize the technology
app that’s out there. That’s gonna allow us to do a better job
of admitting and enrolling the incoming classes to support our goals of access,
affordability and inclusive excellence. Thinking about how to help our staff move
away from these cumbersome processes that can, or from recruitment to
retention to engagement that’s gonna allow us to better engage students,
to allow a better experience for all. Think about scholarships and how we wanna be able to better connect
our resource structure to better ensure that students are gonna have access
to all the available resources out there. And help them find success in
an affordable Ohio State experience. We all know that creating an exceptional
student experience includes the ease of scheduling classes, managing course
wait list, obtaining a transcript, and much, much more, through a modern,
self driven technology. And last, but certainly not least, we want
to be able to meet our students where they are by providing services and engagement
based on their behaviors and their needs.>>[APPLAUSE] [MUSIC]>>Hello, I’m Kimberly Shumate,
the associate vice president for Administration and Operations in
the Office of Human Resources. Like to talk to you for a few minutes
today about the Enterprise Project, business process transformation and
strategic initiative for the university. We’re going to implement a new
system that will allow us to really provide better service to
our HR and payroll community and the university at large, especially for
you HR and payroll employees. We’re going to be able to focus
you more on the strategic work that your clients really need and
allow some of the processes that currently are being done manually to
be enabled by our new Workday system. Really excited about
the work that’s been done so far by everyone on the project team,
both staff and administrators. And I’d like to tell you a little bit
about the work that the staff and administrators have done
the last few months, focusing on a set of guiding
principles for this project. Really going to make that as we do this
work, we do it the right way and enable both the business process transformation
and the system implementation. On the HR side one of the things we’re
most looking forward to is the opportunity to really establish a university
wide onboarding approach. You all know the statistics. That if you really focus on those new
employees within their first year and focus on retaining them, you’ve got a much better chance
of having a stable workforce. We’re excited to be able to bring
a university wide onboarding platform that would really give every new employee
for the first time the same view of Ohio State and the great benefits that
they inherit as new employees here, really helping get them established
firmly in our buckeye traditions and the way that we do our work. Moving along, we’d like to make sure that
everyone is fully engaged in this project, that we make sure that we’ve got all
of our input and enthusiasm and for everyone who’s already been involved,
thank you. [MUSIC] All right, I’m Natalie Sisdomene and I am the business transformation
director for the Enterprise Project and I’m thrilled to be talking a little
bit about the strategic direction for the HR and payroll workstreams as well as
the architect based focus in these areas. But first, just building on what Kim said,
thank you. The type of work we’re asking
you to do is difficult. Lots of sessions,
lots of workshops this phase. And you’ve stepped up in a big way. To co-create the future, and
I’m really motivated by your enthusiasm. So how’re you going to maintain
this going into architect phase? We will. And we’re gonna focus
across all of these areas on designing those business process
solutions, technical solutions and reporting requirements that Beth and
John outlined earlier. And across all these areas
that means looking at how do we get to a better experience,
for our staff, for our employees, for our students our state quarters? We’re going to look at
consistency in the data and the processes that we have
to support HR and payroll. And next slide, let´s talk about
a few of the notable improvement. Our leaders have identified a few areas where we’re gonna dive
deeper in terms of transformation. We’ve done hard work already in
the recruit to hire space to improve that experience. Joanne will go into that in a minute. We’re also taking a look at our HR
service delivery models to align those to the enterprise project and make sure that we have effective
structures there moving forward. And finally, we’ll be looking
at non-employee management. How do we make sure that people
who have access to our systems and our facilities are doing so
in the right ways. And then we have consistency
across the university community. Those are areas of deeper
transformation but we’ll also be looking at streamlining and
standardization across the board. In payroll and time tracking for example, looking at really making those
more efficient and providing employees with more options, looking at some of
those mobile opportunities as an example. But let’s go deeper on recruit to hire.>>Thanks, Natalie. I’m Joanne McGoldrick and
I’m the associate vice president of Total Rewards within
the Office of Human Resources. And I’m really excited to talk to you
today about the recruit to hire phase. And I’ll tell you I am bragging on
the HR teams from the medical center, the university and
campus wide who came together and worked hard to create
one standard process. And what they looked at was the desired
outcome and it was truly to create an outstanding experience for our new
hires, as well as our hiring managers. The most important thing they
did though was they listened. They talked to recruiting managers and
acknowledged that those managers needed a streamlined and reduced time to hire
process that gave them quality candidates. They talked to candidates who felt,
hey, sometimes, I’m in a black hole. I don’t hear from OSU for months,
and it’s discouraging, and I don’t ever apply again. And that’s not the experience
we wanted to provide. And then, they talk to the employees
in the departments who said, I’m tired of these vacancies
lasting months and months and I’ve got to pick up
the burden of the work. So they got together, and they took
a 461 step process down to 89 steps. But they didn’t, yeah,
we’ll take applause.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Phenomenal, remarkable work. But they didn’t stop there. They looked at, what takes the time? And it’s the rework within the process. So they’re working on
special requirement forms, so they truly understand the needs
of the hiring manager. And how they can make that process
easier and first time final? By getting a great role description and being able to get the comp
right out of the gate. The other thing they looked
at was background checks. And they were able to find if
they went with one vendor, they could reduce the time. Background checks from 5 days to 1.6 days, they could reduce the cost from
$62 to $31 per background. And by the way, the quality of
the background was so much better. So those are exciting innovations that the
team has done and they did it together. And created one final process. So, thank you for
all the hard work you’ve done.>>[APPLAUSE] [MUSIC]>>Hi, I’m Mike Papadakis,
Deputy Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer at the Ohio State University
within the Office of Business and Finance. I’m here today to talk to you about
the Enterprise project and what it is, is a strategic transformation across all
of our areas, which includes Business and Finance, HR, payroll and student. And it’s truly a strategic project,
first of its kind in the United States. For finance professionals,
what does this mean? What it means is access to
much more streamline system. Where we’re all gonna have access to the
same data, we’ll all have it on our mobile device, as well and we’ll essentially
have one source of truth. One source of information, so that we can
all speak the same talk whether it’s to internal constituents or outside
parties of the Ohio State University. Turning the clock back at the beginning
of the enterprise project, a number of us sat down and laid out
a number of guideline principles that we would use as a team going
forward on the project. Together this team created a vision,
specific to the finance stake holder experience and what we all hope to
get out of this project, as a team. One of the main guiding principles is
focusing on information availability and strategic decision making
with that information. And what that means is, essentially all
of us having again one source of truth, one source of information
that we can all access, so we’re all answering the same question
with the same data points, talking the same talk whether it’s internally or
externally to the University. Overall, we’re gonna have a much more
modern system that’s gonna streamline processes, make everyone’s job easier on
a day-to -day basis and allow you time to really think about the more strategic
parts of the business and the operation. To make those decisions rather than
focusing on kinda that daily grind, so to speak. Overall, I just want to say
thank you to everyone for helping us get this far in the project and
we really look forward to this next phase. Thanks for everything you’ve done so
far and thank you going forward as well. [MUSIC]>>Hello everyone? I’m Holly Ross,
one of the Business Process Directors for the project along with Rhett, who was
up here earlier talking about student. I’m going to talk a little
bit about finance direction. So, in terms of strategic direction,
our first goal is streamlined, simplified standard processes across
University and health system. Very important on the finance
side which was part of what John showed us logical for
the entire project. We’re looking to try to have UNOS focus
less on that transactional work and more on strategic planning,
working on data analysis to get us to a point where we can be
better at making more educated decisions. So really focusing on getting
us to a point where we can do long range planning, focusing on that
aspect much more than sitting there and keying something in to a system. Is our goal to get to. In terms of core financials,
that was on the timeline and you saw it up there for 2019, a lot of times people are asking what
does that mean, what’s core financials? So, it’s everything that’s
on this list up here. So you can see we have a very
large scope across finance. In terms of 2019, almost everything
on here is in scope for then. The only part that still will be more of
a step approach will be on the planning side, because workday planning we have
some gaps, that we’re working with them. On those, but we will have certainly
parts of that implemented in 2019. And we have another solution, an Oracle
EPM solution that we’ll be looking at for an interim to help us with that too. Also just pointing out here
on the financial scope, this question comes to me a lot,
is grants management. That is in scope and
that’s part of the financial space and then finally, in terms of deep dives,
Natalie mentioned some for the HR side. We do have 3 areas that
we’re concentrating on. One is accounts receivable,
which is what Jeff was saying, Mike was smiling about this morning,
so we are deep diving there. Also, in comprehensive capital investment. So everything around project intake and
building a capital plan, and then finally,
budget planning and forecasting. Hand it over to Chris.>>Thank you.
>>Hi I’m Chris Devine with Office of Business and Finance, I did wanna
start out with saying thank you for all the work you guys have done so
far, I know this is a heavy lift and thanks in advance for everything. We’ll be asking of you for the next few years, because it is gonna
take a village to make this all work. The areas I’ve been asked to talk
about are kind of, where do I see big changes coming forward that are going
to hopefully optimize the process? One, Holly just mentioned a little
bit is accounts receivable. Today for those of you who don’t work
in the accounts receivable area, we have many disaggregated systems,
many shadow systems that exist out there. And in many instances, we don’t even
gather all of our receivable data except sporadically and
once a year to get a clean audit. And clearly that’s not
an optimized process. So, we’re really looking
at what makes sense. Which of those subsidy ledgers that
exist today in a very decentralized way could be put into the work day process. And then from an optimization standpoint,
should be integrated for the current system that is
appropriately utilized. And so we’ll see some big changes from
that perspective, real time data, real time collection activity. That kind of stuff is gonna optimize
the organization in totality. The second area,
I wanted to mention was grants management. Again, not the most current structure as
it is today relative to a process flow. We know we have a lot of manual
processes embedded in that, moving that to automation,
moving it to standardization, will be very helpful,
moving as much as we can. The procurement activity
in back into that, is took standard as much as we can is helpful and
we promised Carol on many occasions, we’ll make sure she keeps having a clean
audit and we make compliance requirements. Because that’s mission critical for
a research organization. So we’re looking at all of those areas and
then reporting just for an example relative to research. Making sure PIs have real time data, that isn’t kind of by grant but
more their whole portfolio. The central areas been able to look
at what our whole portfolio is in real time data from awards,
applications, expenditures by agency
in a push of a button. We’ll be profoundly helpful and that will,
I think, be really helpful Deans and Chairs and
the College Administration also. So I think, lots of very exciting
opportunities with this system. From that I’ll switch it over to Mark.>>Thanks Chris. Mark Laramore, I’m the CFO for the medical
center and I think I was here last time. We met.
So first, thanks to everyone for the work that you’ve done so far. I think we’re transitioning
to kind of an exciting stage. Once you get into architects,
stuff comes to life and then you start to see
it a little bit better. And I think some of the decisions
that we may have made so far, we get the opportunity to
take a look at them and make sure that that’s where
we wanna end up at the end. Certainly, I think the new slogan for the current strategic plan
is appropriate for this and certainly I think I challenged the last
time for everyone to be open for change. I think if we look at all of
the financial systems and especially focused on the supply chain and
procurement side, there are many different silos around the organization and some of
them are big and some of them are small. And certainly, some of those small
areas when you think about the risk that is there and what people worry about. I mean, what may keep them up. Be open to centralizing and looking at the
new ways to do it, and share that risk. I think I do something similar on the IT
side with Phyllis where we look at small shops that carry a lot of risk. And so pass I will say that whoever has
that passed at risk on the Phyllis, Because then she can worry about it and
moving forward. So thank you, Phyllis back there. But I think if I just focus on
the med center supply chain side, we are looking to change and
we are taking some risks with it. I take the workday product is
not quite where we wanted, so we do have the opportunity to
work with them as they designed. The inventory management is a big piece of
us, if you think about how many supplies, quantity and variety of supplies
that are in the med center and how much comes in to
the institution every day. So we do have the opportunity to work with
them and hopefully design a product that I guess as they kind of roll that out to
all their clients, we can kinda say, hey, this is the OSU inventory management
model that we put together with them. So thanks again for the help, but
thanks for continuing to work on this and keep your minds open and we do wanna hear
everyone’s ideas as we move forward.>>[APPLAUSE] [MUSIC]>>Hi, I’m Dave Kieffer. I’m the associate vice president for administrative systems in
the office of the CIO. So when I talk to you today about what the
Enterprise Project means for the IT data analytics and support communities with
the implementation of cloud software, our processes and technologies will
change significantly in these areas. But what we hope to build is technologies
that can build the community around these three areas to be stronger than ever. We think the tools and techniques that
we’ll build will allow all of these areas to get better in their support
of the Ohio State community and our support of the mission. The other thing I wanted to highlight
today is the connection to the IT strategy. So as we look at the IT strategy, the work
of the Enterprise Project hits in almost every area that the IT
strategy is promoting and moving IT forward at a higher state. Specifically, the mobile technology
that we’re bringing it forward as part of the project will allow users and
administrators across campus to use these systems on their mobile devices
from wherever they are. Another area of support for the IT
strategy is in building the community across the university around IT,
data analytics and support. The last area I wanted to highlight
are the guiding principles around the enablement parts of the project. So as you can see here,
these are all very important to our work in the United States and
how we support the mission and there are part in parcel of everything
that we do as part of the project. We really believe in the guiding
principles that we’ve laid out and how to impact the work as we move forward. So, one of the questions that
we’ve had is what is enablement? What does that mean to the project? So the enablement team as part
of the Enterprise Project really are the technology, the support and the
data analytics components of the project. So we’ll do the integrations and
conversions, and reporting pieces of the project. Thanks for a couple minutes of your time
to listen to how the Enterprise Project will impact these communities. Please refer to the project website for
any updates. [MUSIC] Well, good afternoon everybody. I’m Kevin Donaho, I’m the Tech Lead
on the Enterprise Project. Very happy to be here today representing
Dave Kieffer and all the great men and women from the enablement team
that make my job easy every day. Thank you. Also, I’m very happy to be joined
onstage with two of our IT leaders with the university. I do wanna introduce them right away. First from our Wexner Medical Center,
Chief Information Officer and Associate Vice President, Phyllis Teater. And from university Chief Information
Officer, Vice President Mike Hofherr. So as you’ve heard from Dave and from
John earlier, the enablement team is all about improving business capabilities
through data technology and support more high stakes mission. Because it’s not always clear what
we do on the enablement team. I do wanna take just a brief second to
talk about the first three bullets on this line, because they represent kinda
the three teams in our organization. So first, business intelligence, analytics
and reporting led by Steve Fisher. They’re all about implementing
new data governance processes and next generation data platforms, and
tools that will enable a data strategy in a mobile environment that will allow our
user community access to the data they need when they need it
from where they need it. What you’re gonna see from them in
the next phase, you kinda saw earlier is really confirming their requirements and
starting to build out the technical components that’ll comprise their
architecture in the work day world. Second operational design
led by Dave Kieffer. Just as you’ve heard,
this is a transformational project. That group is charged with transforming
how we support the people, processes and systems in our new operating model which
you’re gonna see from them the next phase is building on their plan of foundation,
recommendations by further defining the details of each of the subgroups that
will make up our future operating design. And finally, data and
application management. That’s my team and
we’re kind of all things. We’re gonna be converting your legacy
data, people stuff, integrating work. I’m sorry.
Integrating work day with out internal and external campus partners. Building custom systems outside of workday
or when workday doesn’t meet the business needs, as well as enabling
mobile technologies. And doing all these things in a fashion
that ensures our systems are accessible, secure and there process and
systems are presenting risk and vulnerabilities to the university. So with that,
I’d like to hand the floor to Phyllis and Mike to talk about the notable
improvements coming from our team.>>Thanks Kevin. Again, I’m Phyllis Teater and
I have oversight for technology and medical information management and
apparently risk according to my boss. Thank you, Mark. I was gonna talk about
some of our improvements. But first, I wanna really thank all of
you and thank you for all the work. I know its’ really been a lot of
coordination that’s kind of hurting CATS. And we really appreciate that and
really appreciate the partnership for the medical center, and
the university to work on this together. Think about how we come together
with some of our processes and streamline many things
across the university. First, I’d talk a little
bit about governance. Some of you know that we went
from a whole bunch of systems and a whole bunch of decentralized areas
at the medical center to one integrated system with one electronic medical record. It’s just how now we serve our patients. It was tough, how to bring that together. The beauty of an integrated system
is you change it for one area and it changes for all of them. The difficulty is,
you need to make decisions together. And that takes a governance process. A governance process where you can
understand the individual needs of users, the big departments that are impacted
by this system, clearly finance, HR, purchasing, and student operations. And then you have to make a decision how
to put that together so that you have a system that functions across all the
areas, and folks don’t break each other. It takes a lot of coordination,
communication, and working together. And we built some models at the medical
center and made some mistakes that we’re gonna try to help as we think about how to
do this here university-wide not to make. I’m sure though,
that they’ll be bumps along the road. Also I talk a little
bit about integrations. As many of you’d be aware we have many
years of working on our current platform. And those years can create
sort of a spaghetti diagram of how you paste all the systems together. And unraveling that, understanding it,
and building the right ones in a planful way for our next iteration
of systems is really important work. We know they’ll still be many systems and
they have to talk to each other well. And they have to help us
support the business. Now I’ll turn it over to Mike who’s gonna
talk about a couple of other improvements.>>Sure thanks Phyllis. Thank you to everyone,
thank you to John and the project team. It’s been a lift. Thank you for saving the best for last. So that’s no worries. I’m gonna bring it home here. So, I’m sure [LAUGH] I’m sure you’re
all wondering about data analytics, and I’m sure you wanna know what some of
the notable improvements around data and analytics we are and
what we’re gonna do there. So the first one I’d like to
emphasize is the standardization and simplification of data models. I think you’ve heard this word a lot. Standardize and simplify. I say this every day. Our job is to make environments
that make people successful and the way we do that is making
people’s jobs easier a lot of times. So, we think the standardizing of
those data models is gonna help. I think another big step we’re gonna make
is an institutional wide platform for data analysis. The software enables us to do that. Which really puts us in a different
place than we are right now. The big benefit is,
we stop doing this trick or treating approach to finding data. And I think it’s one of the things that,
if you are out there and you are looking for data and you have to do this I’m
looking at my colleagues on the stage. And some of you in the audience that
I know do this on a daily basis. This is one of the most time consuming
process that we have at this university. Who has that data, where’s that
piece of data, can I have that data? No, well why not? Now I gotta go ask my boss to ask your
boss to give me that piece of data, right, and then in the end it
doesn’t match anyway.>>[LAUGH]
>>So we gotta get better at this and this is hopefully what
the project will do. So the time it takes to do that and the accuracy of which we’ll
gather that data as well. Workday talks about this democratization
of data, and that’s the term that they use, and I think that’s something that we
have to start to get comfortable with. And there’s positives to that,
all the things I just mentioned, and there’s negatives to that as well. And you need a shift in skill set, and
you need a shift in resources on how you understand that data, and
what you do with that data moving forward. So all of this will enable
the strategic plan. You heard Dr.
McPheron talk about this earlier. How we move towards those goals
in the strategic plan and how those things are measured are gonna
take clearly defined processes and clearly defined efforts and again,
these data sets will help us do that. It’s gonna take a village. I think you’ve heard that theme as well. So coordinated efforts across all areas,
distributed IT, college, VPs, areas to really drive
the consistency of that data. This system will only be as good
as the data we put into it. And it’s going to be a huge step for
us going forward. So again, thanks everybody for
their effort. Doesn’t tell me what to do next John, but I’m assuming this wraps up
this portion of the program.>>Thank you.>>[LAUGH]
>>Right? Take it out of my hand.
>>I’m going to take it. A round of applause.>>[APPLAUSE]>>So, I wanna thank all of our business sponsors for
being with us today and for sharing their perception of what’s
going on in their workstreams. It’s valuable information for all of us. We’ve had several questions
come in online and we are gonna answer them
through our website. But because we’re running out of time,
and I want people to sleep at night. I’m gonna ask John one
question that came in. Specifically, I’m sorry I can’t
get to ask everybody a question. Because there are more. But the one question that came in is does
more efficiency mean fewer positions? And I think that the good one for
us to transition to and then allow John to close the program.>>Shoot. They’re gone.
>>[LAUGHTER]>>You’re there alone. Yes.
>>Exactly. That’s why I’m over here. Of course not. I mean the answer, the real answer
to that question is that this will give us the ability to do
more strategic activities. To do what Mike Hoffer
was just describing, where you’re able to do analytics and
be able to do more analysis. So that is, and if you were here in March, that actually game up ad Geoff Chatas
addressed that point as well too. So our goal is to leverage,
I mean from a project perspective, our goal is to leverage a software
as best as possible and to put individuals, to put this
work force into a position where they can take care of
the administrative activities, but also be more strategic in
their day-to-day activities. Okay we do have to wrap it up,
before we do that though, there’s been a lot of thank yous. And that is great. I actually want to thank two
groups that really do a lot of heavy lifting for
us, it is the ASC team. I’ll give you a quick
story about a week ago. We meet with them every two weeks. And that’s a lot that we’re
asking them to meet with us. And in between meetings one of my
ASC members said John I’ve got ten plus emails from you just
in that two week period. So not only do we work with them
closely at these meetings but we also work with them outside it. So we thank you for all your time. Also the enterprise sponsors. That group we met with every week
during the first phase of the project. Plus they were very involved
in a lot of activities. So we thank that group as well too for all of your heavy lifting that you’ve
done so far and will continue to do. Okay, we have a new website. It’s interesting, I was on a conversation. I get pulled in a lot of conversations now
with other universities that are thinking about doing this and they always
complement our website and then they said, by the way it’s even gonna be better
cause’ we’ve updated it and so please check it out the OCM team has done
a tremendous job of further enhancing. A good product that we utilize and we’ll continue to utilize in a very
effective way moving forward. And then lastly, I ask of you,
of all of you, is that we cannot, Chris mentioned the village,
we cannot do this without you. We need you to stay
connected to the project. We need you to continue
to ask those questions. We need you to push us as it
relates to the best practices, and thinking out of the box,
when it comes to this. We need you to champion the changes,
the change will be a lot. It will be heavy lifting, but
we need individuals that’ll help us to champion that, to understand the impact,
and work with us as we go forward. And we need your insight. We needed it during the first phase. I think Marc Lairmore mentioned about,
this is the phase where we get in, we get to start to see stuff,
get to see more stuff. We need those insights that
all of you can provide. With that being said, we´re two minutes
over, hopefully you´re okay with that. Thank you for your time, give us the feedback on this session
Because we’re gonna continue to do. Thanks, have a nice rest of the day. [APPLAUSE]

Danny Hutson

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