12th Annual Chancellor Leadership Forum on Diversity and Inclusion

12th Annual Chancellor Leadership Forum on Diversity and Inclusion


I’m going to ask you to come on
in and take your seats. You can filter down to the front. Good afternoon, everyone. Good to see you all here welcome
to the Chancellor’s Leadership Forum on Diversity & Inclusion. It’s great to see everyone here. Renee, I think the box lunches
were a great success. Get double the number next year
when word gets out. We meet annually. It’s every day that we strive to
after firm our support and show
appreciation for all members for diverse community. This locates
on the like ay pipeline. We mean, various UCSF outreach
efforts at student, staff and facility levels that are aimed at recruiting
people and people are the university’s most valuable
asset. about programs addressing our
pipeline challenges, we will hear about a
UCSF wide initiative that I’m excited about. This is an initiative to make
UCSF an anchor institution. You will hear what that means in a
little bit. Effort aims to highlight our
ongoing contributions and engagement with our community as
well as increase opportunities in San Francisco and the Bay Area through workforce
development under resourced populations
includesive pro procurement practices and
implementation of community investment strategy. You are
going to hear about this exciting initiative that will be
kicking off in months to come. about various pipeline efforts
and reflect how we can improve our
success at different lefltz levels. We have four openings within my leadership cap net — cabinet
and working to implement inclusive
practices that should result in diversity pool. I thank the chairs of those
committees for excellent work to date. outreach programs within the
public schools in our own community. We celebrated 20th anniversary
of center for science education and outreach. Which has been working with
under represented students in Bay Area to increase their
college awareness and exposures to careers in health
sciences. Standard’s involvement is complimented by
science, health education partnership which is a 30 year
effort that supports science teachers in San Francisco
unified school district by providing them with professional
development and UCSF voluntar volunteers to
co-teach science in their classrooms. diversify the student pipeline
include baccalaureate programs for
medicine, and pharmacy and dentistry. School Number of students
admits is grown from 33% in 2016 to 43% in
2017 given under resourced students a great start in their careers. At
community level, UCSF has important number of efforts. One of them is preterm birth —
improve health incomes for babies who will born too soon. You will hear more about UCSF
overall involvement in the community during the panel
session in just a few minutes. Our goal is to make UCSF
representative of our city and of our state in which we live in these
efforts require continuous engagement by all of us. Certainly cannot be achieved by sporadic interventions or a
small group of our community. Sustained commitment to evaluate
our recruitment and hiring practices
and our climate to make UCSF a place where everyone can thrive. In closing in my remarks, I
thank the vice-chancellor. Renee Navarro and the work of
her team to helping us advance UCSF. Diversity, equity, inclusion are
call to institutional excellence. Join me in welcoming Renee to
the >>Thank you, chancellor Sam
Hawgood for your leadership. It’s through your support for
leadership in consistent ongoing way that we are going to be able
to successfulfully move the needle
and go to equity, diversity and
inclusion. We have instituted this forum as
a way as part of our accountability to you, the
campus community. Those of you live streaming,
those of you in the room, our intention is to share with you what activities
we are engaged in and successes and challenges. We recognize that we are all
apart of the solution to moving UCSF
closer to where we want to be as an institution. I thank the
leadership for being here as well in support of today’s
forum. annually to talk about our
demographics just to give you a snapshot of who we are as a campus community and
you can see exactly where we’ve made
some changes over the course of time and where we still have significant
barriers to being fully reflective of our city, state
and country. looking at entry level to UCSF
from our learners. When we look at our students and
our trainees, we find that that group of members of our campus
community are fairly diverse. 35% of our learners are Asian.
40% are white. African-Americans have had a 1%
gain from 2010 to 2018. Numbers are at 5%. We had an improvement in
Hispanic up to 11% to 8%. That’s 301 African-American
students and 664 Hispanic students out of
6032. Native Americans are less than 1%. We have opportunities for growth
and improvement as relates to our learners. that for our faculty, there is
not been very much change over the course starting in 2010 and looking for
African-Americans at 1% increase in the faculty. Diversity, Hispanics have
doubled. And so we have 6% increase in
our Asian faculty populations. 116 African-American faculty
across all of four schools in graduate
division and 232 Latino faculty across
all of the schools in the graduate division. Our gender parity is at 15%. It’s at 50% since 2015 academic
year. staff is a majority minority
staff. In fact, for the first time ever in this 20,000 members of our
campus community, really the core as an
institution are staff. And our staff are majority Asian
this year for first time. The number of Asian staff out
number the number of staff pretty close
to one another. When we look at underrepresented
minorities, African-Americans comprise 8% and Hispanics
comprise 12%. With Native American ands a
Alaskans to be less than 1% of our staff population. We see the numbers. There are 5% of total staff are
represented by managers. You will see that few of the minorities underrepresented
minorities are riding rising or hired in
high levels of staff management. — has no represented staff at
all. That’s one of the areas where we are going to continue to focus . We know we are a female staff
organization as well. That is not consistently carried
across the increasing levels of management in our staff. Highest level we switched to
majority male within the staff managers
as well. Within the executive leadership
and senior management group, small group of individuals,
represented by 14% African-Americans, 5% Asian, 5%
unknown. It’s majority male at 58%. substantial and Gant Gant and
not nearing parity within our role of state and production of
healthcare, providers and scientist that is are going to
serve an increasingly diverse population. We have been
working across a number of initiatives to really
influence the ability of our institution to
both prime the pipeline, build diverseity
and those interested in sciences and health center leadership and
administration. But also in how we actually
recruit as an institution, how do we select
our students. Hire our faculty and staff and create a climate in which they come to
UCSF and thrive in our environment. One of newest initiatives and
you will hear more about this from our
panelists, Cynthia Chiarappa, is a program that several leaders of our campus
staff participated in, through their
participation in this program created a guide for us to use entitled
with leading with diversity and how to implement to increase our
ability to diversify the leadership across
the UCs. When we look at what we are
doing as relates to recruitment stat —
strategies, each of our schools use a holistic methodology for
recruitment and admissions of students. They are looking at
entire student. Life experience of those
individuals brings value to the class. We know that those
differences are important for practitioners. Having a
holistic approach to admission has led to the increases in part that we have seen and seen
and diversification of our students. Holistic way in looking at who
we are bringing on as residents and as fellows. This is directed by Dr. Guy. Culmination of factors and
activities that bring under represented
minorityies together from cross programs — across programs. Breaking down those silos and
recognizing power of community. You build a sense of cohesion
and belonging. Has led to increase in ability to match under represented
minorities into our program up to 29% in 2018
match. advancement for us. We had an advancing faculty
excellence in faculty recruitment grant
that office of diversity received from office of
president which contributed to ability to hire under
represented minority faculty until the latter rank
series. We instituted faculty advisers. These are senior faculty
members. I know Nancy is here and George
Taylor from school of dentistry. They are trained in best
promising practices for making sure that
pool of qualified candidates is diverse as possible. Advice Add — advise them to
issues of unconscious bias. Incredible resource to help us
move the needle relative to
diversification of pools of our faculty. We have a special initiative on
our basic science faculty. We recognize for the four basic
science departments where there are about 250 faculty, there are
only four underrepresented minorities
across the group of basic science faculty. So our Provost has with the
Deans, come together, hired Dr. Michael Penn to work with Carol
Gross and improve diverse candidates
who are focused on basic sciences. diversity grant. This grant helped to
intentionally do outreach activity to provide additional funds to improve recruitment
packages. I’m pleased that three of
scholars are here on campus with fourth
starting this summer. Typically, we recruit zero to
maybe one underrepresented minority
and latter rank faculty series each year. To have recruited four is except
exceptional. We are excited about the grant
and the outcomes of those activities which we will
continue to focus on. focused on staff, largest
component of our campus community and
continuing to focus on staff. Our focus on staff centers
around the recruitment practices but also critically importantly
the experience of your lived experience as a staff member at
UCSF. What’s the culture. What’s the climate. What access to resources do you
have? We held our fourth annual staff resource day with 671 people
attending. Biggest one yet. We hope to continue in our
partnerships with human resources and campus life services to be able
to provide for them like that where
staff have access to information about what’s happening on
campus. Our scaf l staff RCO lounge,
working with staff resource groups,
black caucus and Asian Pacific islander
association, elevating voices that are
usually not heard. We are going to continue to make sure that we
are centering the voices of our staff as we move our initiatives
forward. This — retreat in the fall. This was a partnership between
diversity and outreach and school of medicine to see where we are to
assess our — help identify what is the vision that we have future of UCSF. What do we see ourselves being
like relative to equity and inclusion in coming years and
how can we push ourselves to get there. How do we hold ourselves
accountable? It was a full day of engaged
conversations with the leadership. Many of you in this
room and one of the things we recognize is need
for interconnectedness for all of us working on these issues to have the
impact that we want to have. how are we thinking about
diversity, equity and inclusion education on our campus? Is
there some standard basic conversation that everyone as a
member of UCSF community would be able
to engage in and understand what’s
diversity, what are microaggressions. What are some things that often
serve to alienate certain groups of individuals and how do we have courageous conversations like
racism and homophobia and sexism issues
that come up. Task force is looking at how we can do that more effectively on campus
as we have done a lot of education to training to date. will repeat a climate survey. This is a survey of all members
of our campus community to determine based on your personal
identify, what is your experience of being a member of
our campus community? Our goal is to establish this as every three, three-year program where
we want to ask you about your lived experiences. We are
making sure that we are Efforts to prevent sexual
misconduct continue to be the top priorities for us. Our goal
is to make sure that no one experiences any harassment or
discrimination of any kind. And we participated in a
conversation with leaders from national
academies who produced this report around what academic
institutions need to do. There are several recommendations.
I’m pleased that we have been supported to join an action
group. UCSF will be among other leading institutions in action group in implementing strategying that
are identified from national academy report. We are exciting about moving
that forward. campus as well. We have with the leadership of
in our office and campus committee on
LBGT — great leadership in this sphere. We have launched a pronouns
campaign that is greatly receiveed across
our campus. We implemented the necessary systems changes relative to California
state gender recognition act. We launched also a trance at UC website, one-stop shop for
individuals to go and what are all the resources on campus that
are available to individuals. In addition, we mapped out with
campus life services all the gender
inclusive restrooms are on campus. All of this information
can be found on ODO website. disabilities, a key important
part of the work that has been done. This has led us in thinking
about accessibility. Being an employer of choice for
individuals. We have a federal requirements
around percentage of workforce with individuals with
disabilities and how are we working with intention to make
sure we are a friendly employer, that we have appropriate
accommodations for learners as well. With that, their support, we
have launch faces of mobility
campaign at UCSF as well. lead the way. They have come together in a way
that is important. They recognize that across the health
sciences and graduate division that they have more commonalty in many of
these issues and going to help direct us to what they articulated as our
needs relative to curriculum. Curriculum that is not
oppressive to them or marginalizing. How should we think about the
ways we are delivering information to our learners. They want more psychosocial
support. Places of support. Financial support. They want a climate and culture
where they feel they belong. We are encouraged by the work
inspired by the work of our learners and we will continue to
keep them centered in the work as moving forward. One of the
greatest areas where they find community. They find a safe space is
multiculture resource center. Our LBGT resource center. The first floor on west side is
going to undergo a renovation. We are excited it’s a brighter
space for our faculty and staff to
utilize our space. And for the first time, we are excited that we are going to have a
presentation presence at Mission Bay. We have not had one. We
are in the process of building out a space on Mission Bay
campus. That will be a safe place for our campus constituent and say save constituents and be as a gateway
that will allow our students to come to campus and get introduced to our
scientists and our faculty and our staff. It will be a nice
place for us to build on those aspects of our
community engagement down there at Mission
Bay It’s a pleasure for me to talk about and celebrate the 20-year
anniversary of center for science and educational
outreach. We have been working in our
schools and the schools that have typically the lowest
amounts of resources. Highest numbers of under
underrepresented minorities, setting minds that they can go
to college and here is the way to do it. Supporting counselors and
providing extra things to those individuals. Uppedward bounds
programs. We are helping to ensure the
future of individuals in our community. little bit of a video that I
will ask Brian to launch for you. (video playing that has been I just want people to
acknowledge Don Woodson. I invite our panelists to come
forward. We will introduce our panelists. Thank you.>>Good afternoon, everyone.
I’m Lisa Cisneros. I’m a latest latest Senior
Director, Strategic Relations, University Relations. I’m a member of campus Latino
group. I’m moderating this discussion.
First is Don Woodson. MEd, Director, Center for Science
Education & Outreach. Works with K-16 students and
community members to design programs that
foster academic achievement and enable
their admission to colleges and
universities. Joe Guglielmo. PharmD, Dean, School of
Pharmacy. Pharmacist, international expert
and antimicrobials to treat
infections. MD, Professor, Department of
Medicine. Currently conducts
community-based research — health disparities related to cancer, nutrition and
physical >>Cynthia Chiarappa. Vice
President, Administration, and Chief of Staff, UCSF Health. In her role, she is a senior
adviser to CIO leading key thertives of
— initiatives in strategic priorities. And Howard
Pinderhughes. Professor & Chair, Social & Behavioral
Sciences, School of Nursing His research focuses on the
social determine Netanyahus —
determinants in health. Before each panelists gives us a three-minute synopsis of their
efforts to address the like ay pipeline,
I — the leaky pipeline, I want you
to submit your questions to via e-mail.
You can join the conversation on Twitter using hashtag UCSF university and UCSF
ODO.>>Hello, everyone. How you
doing today? I want to thank everyone for
allowing me to be on a panel. Didn’t that video make you feel
good? I’m telling you. It’s interesting every time I see
that video, it’s a stark reminder of
why we do the work that we do. It’s a reminder of looking out
at audience here today and looking at individuals on this
campus looking at excellence and want to make sure
that we connect that excellence to those people as well. For
past 20 years, we have been working in the schools, helping
students to connect what we do here at
UCSF, careers that are here at this university to their dreams. To their hopes, to the
possibility that they may have to one day be
able to do something different. As well as to support their
families in various ways. We helped them navigate high
school. Helped them to figure out what higher education
institutions they want to attend. Help them to figure out
whether a career like this is for them or
not. And to try and move them into a direction that they see
themselves being in. So all of those things we have
done for over 16,000 students over
the past 20 years. When I say 16,000 students, I
don’t mean they came to an event and
we waived to them and they walked back out. I mean we have worked with them,
had multiple touch points with them over a two to four-year period working
with those students to make sure they are preponderance of the
evidence. We are proud of that. We have also had the opportunity
to look at our data. Over the past 12 years, 96% of
the students that have been in our programming that went on to
higher education. We had 74% of the students that
has been a part of our programming go directly to a
four-year institution. And we have had 64% of those
students that moved on and had a major that was within a health career field
when initially in their freshman
year, only 22% recall actually interested — were actually
interested. We know that programs like this have an
impact. We know that. I would love to say that I was
the one that did this work by myself. I would love to. If you could give a hand to the
CSO staff. If you could, stand up. They are amazing thought
partners in this whole process. And their energy and enthusiasm
and expertise in what they do, their
ability to counsel, their ability to
talk with teachers, parents and
administrators is incredible. I want to thank you all for the
work that you do. the only ones that do this. We are one of 35 clubs or
programming that do programming at UCSF that
worked for pipeline or outreach work. We are one of only five
that are pipeline driven. How far, we all share the exact
same challenges. One of the main challenges we have is
access. Trying to get UCSF students in
the community to UCSF. struggling to find seven
laboratories for students do to do their
summer internships. I know that we are not alone in
that. I know SEP is always trying to
find labs. If there are some that are
there, please contact us. We want them to have that
experience. The area is sustainability. Takes money today this and takes
institutional funds to be able to do this. Many programs on
grants. Many of those grants run out. In many cases, they are not up
for renewal. Important that we start thinking about where do we really want to put
our funds to move the future forward for
the young people in the community that we have at UCSF
and we truly want everyone here to be involved. Thank you. So I’ve been asked to address
the leaky pipeline a tad beyond what
Don described at interface between college and health
professional school. I’m going to talk about the post
baccalaureate program at UCSF. What is that program and who are
those students? What the program is, is a year
long structured program to become a
more competitive applicant for a health profession school. Lasts 11 months and begins every
August. Who are these students? They are essentially students
with a bachelor’s degree who maybe
might need a little more preparation before
going to unsuck successful — idea is to
get them ready for application process next time around. program specifics. It’s completely
interprofessional. This is combined efforts from school of dentistry, medicine and
pharmacy. Collaborative in 11-month time
period. Full year of upper division
course work at UC Berkeley extension
that they There is assistance with the
application process that they have interest in applying to. They receive academic and
learning skills development where
applicability help with admission tests sort of
preparation. They get mentorship both from
faculty and also from previous post baccalaureate students who
are now in They get an automatic interview
for health profession school if they have a certain minimum GPA and varies
from three schools that are involved. If you look at all
three schools, you will see verbiage that sounds
like this. It says this program is designed from individuals from disadvantageed
backgrounds or under served communities. Explicit wording that says
groups traditionally under-represented
in health profession are encouraged to These students take 12 unites 12 units of heavy-duty coursework
for two semesters straight. And they are monitored during that
year by faculty mentors. successes and challenges.
Successes of the program are the following. First of all, a
little bit of a timeline. First to actually create the
program was school of dentistry in 1998
and school of medicine in 1999. And school of pharmacy started
in 2010. 2018, there have been over 800
highly diverse program that completed
the post-bac program. What happened to those students? If
you look at acceptance to health profession school, 75% of all
the post-bacs ended up in school of dentistry. And 95% of school of medicine
and pharmacy respect I have
respectively ended up in respected schools. If you were interested in UCSF
in relate to these individuals,
till quite good — still quite good. School of dentistry, 50% ended
up at us UCSF. School of pharmacy, 90%. think are challenges. This is not like anybody that
wants to do it gets in. It’s competitive. Some get in. Some
do not. Increasing applicant pool that
limits the number of individuals that can be involved. Frankly the real limitation is
money and cost. These individuals, there is
limited scholarship and other grant support for these
programs. It’s varied. There is a student loan debt
associated with the program. How much is it? Ranges from 33 to $34,000 for
that post–backbac year. I find this impressive that
these students have debt from
undergrad and know they have debt from
undergraduate program that they take this on. Last thing I say, this feels
like anybody deserves fiscal chance to get help along the way, it’s this
post-bac group. School of pharmacy has decided to support themto to the tune of
upcoming group in August that school is covering half those
costs.>>Great. Thank you. I am so excited to share the
work that a group of about 23 UC Coro colleagues developed
over the last year. We took on the challenge of
studying diversity in SMG which is the
senior management group. It’s about 200 individuals that
are the leaders across UC. And we thought, okay, if we
started at the top, it’s an opportunity to
study the current state, what is really happening and also drive
change for the very top of the organization. of California shows that indeed
there is a leaky pipeline. In 2017, 75% of students across
UC are diverse and nonwhite. 35% of the SMG group is
nonwhite. The population automobiles,
obviously, there is a leaky pipeline as you go up the
organization and from gender diversity, data suggests the
glass ceiling. Staff and middle management. Quite a few more women and much
fewer where there is 37% of women in
senior So how can we recruit more
leaders to UC? That’s the focus of our study is around the
recruitment piece. We had three findings that there is extensive variation across the
University of California in recruitment practices. Good news is, diversity is
becoming much more common and important
in the conversations. Bad news is, there seems to be
more talk than action. Which leads to the second point. We found is uneven
accountability. There is no carrot or stick. A lot of work
is not visible. Third, is this notion that
developing and retaining senior leaders is
a bit of a hit-and-miss proposition. Our group came up with three
recommendations. creating a new systemwide policy
specifically on SMG recruitment. There are SMG policies out
there. None of them specifically deal with SMG
recruitment. Our thinking was how do we
create some standards around how we go about recruiting our most senior
leaders? because chancellor has four open
positions. Many of recommendations are being
applied. I’m on two of these committees. I can be of testimony to the
fact that these practices are actually happening. There are
some element that is we thought are fundamental. Requiring diverse search
committees seems like a no-brainer. We found a lot of
variation. Having equity or diversity
adviser on search committee helps to lead the group through what might be some
implicit bias in the questions that we ask or how we Requiring diversity statements
from the candidates to tell us what you have you done in this
arena or what do you plan to do if you come to this
organization? How do we prepare our search committees to be attuned to
implicit bias that they have. And requiring diverse applicant
pool. Looking at what is identified in
our a firmative action plan at each UC
location. And looking for applicant pools
that are reflective of demographics
for that role and having the same standards for recruitment
firms. Few practices that we found
across UC that were interesting that we hope to put into action are blinded
applications. Remove names. Remove schools. Those are two
things that can create the level playing field so that you are
not going in there and immediately assuming that
somebody that is coming from a non-Ivy League school has
lesser education. riverside, they require
mandatory review by Provost, chancellor’s office
or equal employment opportunity office to give us a look to see who is coming
through. Second recommendation is
accountability. How can we build specific
criteria around our SMG leaders,
performance evaluations? Could be around diversity training or
community building or mentoring. But how does this become a
little bit more hard-wired. lolly local locally. This is great occasion to be
transparent how we are doing. Not happening consistently
across the university. That is a good practice. And publish annual reporting
across all the UCs and progress across
the goals. We recommend that office of
president develop presidential awards and recognition to
highlight progress that is being made. study is so complex, we actually
had to defer and we recommended that
future study be really focused on
leader development retention and
succession planning. We saw great practice in our research.
We needed to keep our scope narrow. In general, we heard, it’s
lonely at the top. How do we improve mentorship? How do we improve leader
practices. How do we develop the pipeline? Perhaps there are visits to
other UCs that we can do more
collaboratively. I’m pleased to say that this
year’s UC Coro — northern California cohort is taking on this specific element
of the work. We are looking forward to continue to be
engaged. We are excited about the work that is happening here at U UCSF given
the openings for chancellor’s
cabinet and putting these things into action.>>Good afternoon. You saw me
taking a picture. I’m going to tweet it out later. It’s relevant because we have a hashtag called UCSF prow. You
are not tweeting, you don’t care. I thought about what does it
mean to be UCSF proud. We are number one this and that
if I thought hard on diversity and research. I’m proud because we don’t stop
trying to get better. This is going to be my message. I don’t
think we are doing great. We are striving to be better. I
think we need to think about this problem the same way we
think about every other problem we think about in this university is creatively. past has got us here and not a
very good place. I want to jump in and talk about positive
things. Don was saying how he didn’t do
all the work. He did some. I didn’t do any. I’m taking no
credit. I want to highlight a program SF
bill. Grant funded oy NIH –. We were fortunate to get one
here. And the principle for the SF
bill is simple. If you want URM people, you
don’t go to places where they are not and
find them. You go to where they are. I’m joking. When you
think about where we recruit our people. We go to number two.
Number three, right? I think that’s fine. That’s why we don’t have a lot
of URM people. That’s straightforward. Thousands of URM STEM students.
Thousands. So I don’t really want to hear
the word pipeline when comes to this. There are lots of people
there. What are we doing with them to make sure we get here?
SF bill. Couple of things about SF bill. Their goal is to
approach education in different way. We are not talking about
deficits. We are talking about strengths. Addressing things like
stereotype threat. Minorities are qualified at
table. And bring strengths that other people don’t. That’s the
goal. They have been doing this training. Last semester, they trained the
students in way of approaching career. They have shown, actually, that
doing this training improve their GPA
compared to those who don’t go through this training. It’s innovative and impactful.
We have build scholars program. There are 51 of them up to date.
They bring them working together to train them intensively and
putting in research lap. lab. There are 51 people who could
come to UCSF and do work with lots of experience. These are
good numbers. We are confident that that bill
is renewed for five years. called — trying to train
students to be clinical research coordinator. Not to think of research as only
a single pathway, become a faculty or PI. Many different
ways of participating in research, we need to go where students are if they want to
become faculty. More diverse CRCs that you have,
you have more diverse participants
and more diverse faculty. allocation program. It’s small
grants. We were able to — research
office able to put in small supplement
for URM investigators working on disparities. We are trying to
promote additional support. One of the activities that I have
been working on is called diversity
supplement program. Great program called diversity
supplements, if you hold a qualifying grant, you can bring lots of —
to bring a person on. UCSF has three to 400 eligible
grants each year. These are easy to get funded or hit rate is depending on institute
is 10 to 30%. We are leaving money on the table. CTSI and office diversity outfit
reach started this by — differences
matter and research in the office is
working on — much more of a clear
infrastructure of how to do this. Identifying qualify URM
trainees. Matching them. Making sure they can write a
grant. They can keep on getting
trained. That’s an ad hoc infrastructure. That goes into my first ask. Most of this work is grant-based
or basically ad hoc work by people
who are motivated to do this work. We need support for
infrastructure. I think you are hearing so far lots of great
things going on. Where is infrastructure to make sure, one, that we keep on doing good
work and two, grow this really good work. One last initiative
I wanted to point out. Dr. Republican Renee Navarro pointed
out, we are doing good. Not doing well with faculty. We had four faculty out of 210.
Less than 2%. This is way the department
approached this is cool. They took — took on faculty
lead and Michael Penn, wrote a white
paper. Here is the problem. What are we going to do about
it. This is a real problem. Let’s do hiring, not the way we
normally do it. It’s very siloed. It’s an agreement in
department chairs, what we are going to do. That is signed off
by university leadership, Provost and all the
Deans. Money allocated for it. This is beginning. We are in
the search for it. We have last I heard over 35
qualified URM candidates. Going back to point I’m making. Not
pipeline problem with hiring faculty level. We have a lot of
data in the last ten years or so that says that%
percent of number of URMs has gone up
remarkably. Faculty hiring is flat president
I think. I think the UCSF it’s been flat.
We are looking at our faculty diversity and we are saying that pipeline problem, I think we
have wrong problem. Ph.D.s are out there. What we are not
doing is hiring them. You know, I hear this a lot. I hear, it’s a competitive world
here. Well, if you go chase — if you
set a certain criteria for qualified faculty and you go to
same places looking for them, all the qualitied faculty
are getting chased by everybody. They don’t want to come here
because cost of living is high. We have to think creatively. Can we have a more structured
way of doing it if one department doesn’t want to do it, two departments, we
can bring people in? We need to think creative of
this problem and invest. We cannot bring them on board
without enough resources. One, they will not come. If they do come, they are set up
for failure. Not a good thing either. My job is diversity leader, like
a cabinet secretary without portfolio. I don’t have any
power. there and think about
strategically. My blue sky scenario is that if
you want to improve the number of
URM faculty on research side, think about it. $25 million. 25 yurm 25 URM faculty member. That’s a huge increase in the
equity and inclusion and increase in
number of mentors we have. I know that $25 million is a lot
of money to me. I don’t know if it is to you,
thanks. You can see I’m standing pick
up. They are sitting down. I have a
bad back. I apologize. I’m excited to talk to you about
an initiative that is evolving over a number of months and years here
at UCSF. We have come to a point where I
think we are ready to go public a little bit. So I’m going to
describe that. In contrast of what you heard thus far, most of
what we are going to be talking about is division for
this. What we want to do and where we
want to go. Just a little bit of history
about few years back, number of us in the center for community engagement started
to work and relate to a nationwide
network of folks who are doing work on what is called anchor institution
initiatives. For those of you who don’t know what that is, anchor institutions are
institutions into a community that have the capacity to help create
wealth and health of surrounding community. And they do it in a
variety of ways. Part of what you heard already
is part of the ways that they have been functioning as anchor
institution. this initiative is taking it to
somewhat different place. That is to acknowledge, understand
and try to strategically utilize the
awesome economic power that is our infrastructure here at UCSF.
Some of you probably know. Some of you probably don’t. We have second largest employer
in city and county in San Francisco. We hire a lot of people. We buy
a lot of goods. So if you think about that in terms of the possibilities for utilizing
that infrastructure for helping to improve the health and well being of
under served and under resourced
communities in surrounding communities, that’s what the
anchor institution initiative is Taking that as an idea, we have worked with in the anchor
institution network, exposed to where they are doing it.
Cleveland clinic in Cleveland. In Baltimore. In Minneapolis, St. Paul. A number of places have engaged
in anchor institutions initiative building. been able to start thinking strategically about how do we
move UCSF firmly into this space of being an effective anchor
institution. Part of what my message has been
consistently. We have potential to be a
nationwide example. The gold standard for about a an
anchor institution can be. As I have already mentioned in
terms of the infrastructure in our community and also in terms
of people we have here as a resource and commitment to
diversity. Our tag line is advancing health worldwide. Part of the point of anchor
institution initiative is beginning with the communities
that are right next door. And the way in which we propose to
do that is to look in the ways in
which we hire. Look at pipelines that we have
into our organization and figure out
ways to seed and expand our ability
higher that are most vulnerable and hard
hardest to employ. People most impacted by health
and effects. equities equity — equities.
How do we improve health equity. How do we reduce health
disparities in San Francisco in the Bay Area? The anchor initiatives is one of
best opportunities to do so. One initiatives that can
actually move the needle on social
determinants of health by providing employment opportunities, by providing
opportunities for business and investment. And these are all pieces of what
that vision is about. Now, about two years ago, we at
center for community engagement, we are talking about with number
of folks about how do we advance this work here at
UCSF. We were talking about with chancellor’s office and we
were fortunate enough to have San Francisco foundation step up
to be a full partner with us in the first phase of this
initiative. They put up half and
chancellor’s office put up half for
assessment of potential for UCSF as institution in San Francisco
and in the Bay Area. We completed that and planning to release that assessment in
mid-May. I have looked at all reports and
assessments nationwide from different anchor institutions
initiatives in various cities. This assessment and report goes
well beyond what any of the rest of them have in terms of our treans in terms of how we hire
and retain. Provides somewhat of a road map
for how do we get to that next step
to impact the health and well being
through our infrastructure. Look for that in mid-May. What
we are doing now is building the infrastructure in our UCSF
organization to start building on some of the existing infrastructure on
pipelines that we can enhance and create
more efficiency around being able to
provide these opportunities for under
served and underresourced communities. opportunities. And the second, how do you get
people ready for those opportunities. And reality is
communities that we are talking about, they are not ready. We have to enter into
partnerships outside of our institution. Be able to create those
pipelines that will allow for people to come in. You are
going to hear a lot more about the anchor institution
initiative moving forward. For those of you interested in
getting more information, center for community engagement, we are moving this
forward. Wily is spearheading it to a
large degree. You are going to hear much more
about it. I’ve been asked to stop. I’m going to stop there. But I just want to say, I want
to thank the chancellor to embrace
this vision and move it forward. It is about not doing business
as we have before. But understanding that we can do
more. We can do way more and at a time
when we are losing our core black and
brown communities out of the city of San Francisco, we have potential to
be an anchor for those communities, sustain them, maintain them and promote
health and well being. report. We have podiums on both sides of
room. You can also send in questions via e-mail. Not sure
if we have questions online yet. School of dentistry. Sheila. I have a question of pipeline
and if we know of young people who might be appropriate for one
of your programs. The center for science education
or outreach, how would we go about
directing that person to your resources?>>Great question. So in San Francisco, we work
with very specific partner schools in the
most underserved areas of San Francisco. We also recognize
that there are other students throughout the entire city that
are in need. If there are students that you
know of that are in need that would fit
in with what it is we are looking as a student, send them
my way. I generally have individuals
that e-mail me and we put them in
appropriate >>We have programs for middle
school as well.>>We have our inside UCSF event
that is actually tomorrow. To where we have students that will come to UCSF to demystify what
this university is about. There are opportunities there.>>My name is Carlos. I’m a first year student in
biomedical program. I’m AMEX a Mexican-American
student. I gone through the entire pipeline that you
mentioned from preschool and HSS to Ph.D. every step of the way with UC
Berkeley before. And all that said and the beautiful story and
the video. I’m son of service worksers . Their cleaning and food
service respectively. In 2008 when financial crisis
hit, we were foreclosed on and almost
forced to leave the state of California because we lost our
home. We were able to stay because the given full-time contracts at
institutions that allowed me to succeed and — NSF
and (Indiscernible) and others that I can go on and on about.
Public education allowed me to ask this question today. With all that in mind, how would
you reconcile if you were me of —
attending a university that parades
paradeses paradeses praises you and then
also cuts your programs. Thank you.>>How would you if you were me. This is more of atheoretical
personal question because I’m wrestling
with this pa ro box through the whole program. If you were me
seeing how these workers are being ongoing
negotiations and forced to leave their homes as Howard mentioned,
how would you reconcile sitting on the sidelines as this
happened while you benefited from those programs being cut and
possibly preventing students from even making the most of
these programs that you offer in the first place? If they are
not around, they will not be able to use them. What are your
opinions and how are you >>Sounds like an anchor
institution question. I have my own take.>>It’s a dilemma for any person
of color that comes through higher education. Been a dilemma for me since I’ve
gone through faculty member and moved through. Part of its, I’m speaking to you
— dilemma is that you figure out
ways to do the work that promotes these
types of programs. Get yourself intoen
institutional framework and setting where you can make a
difference. Taken a long time that chance
Lor able to listen to me. That’s part of the process. All of these institutions, they function as institutions, as
corporations, as various entities. Right? Point is to
figure out how you work with them to advance those. You have
a unique perspective on all of these pieces or part of your
value is to get with folks like me and other folks to ask that
question and ask, how do we engage this question?
This is embedded in your question is part of the things
that we have been talking about in the report what happens with workers at UCSF and how do
we engage these questions. These are hard issues. First
step is asking hard question. I probably didn’t give you a good
>>Follow-up on that. I tweeted yesterday
(Indiscernible) I tweeted yesterday sometimes
great institutional change occurs because of great leaders.
Many times occurs from other people including the students. The fact that I’m here talking
to you as part of difference matters is
only possible because black lives
matters and — that’s what drove some degree
of school to look at equity and
inclusion. You have lots of choices. You can choose to make
change within the institution or from outside of institution. We need all hands on deck to
make changes.>>I’m part of school of nursing
student government ASSN. We wanted to know if there is school-wide efforts to increase
opportunities for students to experience things in the
classroom that may not quite reach the level of needing to be
reported to office of — discrimination. Need to be addressed kind of
like what Dr. Howard Pinderhughes does in
school of nursing and school-wide. Second part, are there efforts
to reallocate funds that go to school of medicine students to support all
school students, that’s a big way that we can help with
inclusion throughout the entire university. Thank you.>>We’ve had this conversation.
Yes, we have been looking at how do we actually capture
microaggressions. How do we capture the sort of every day
negative interactions that occur. We are struggling to
create a systematic way in which we can capture them. On the surface, tiny, slight or
some kind of interaction because of who you are, race, gender, et cetera, is
not reportable as — if question
handle them individually, we are not going to be able to say you are not a repeat
offender. That is a violation of policy. We wrestle in the way that we
can make it accessible. Some have developed apps. We are looking at folks at UC
Santa Cruz to see if there is an app where we can capture real
time so we can build those things in office of
harassment and discrimination so we can follow through on
investigations for policy violations where we can implement sanctions
against individual for behaver in those
ways. Huge focus around those are
things that impact the climate and lived experiences coming
through UCSF. Very important. Reallocation of resources. Deans, chancellor? You know, each of schools have initiatives around supporting
the students. Office of diversity and outreach
does this. We will focus on enter
professionalism and how we can do our part to make sure that
students feel they have support that they need in order to
thrive in our environment.>>Hello, everyone. How you all
doing? You doing good? Okay. I have a
question from online. What steps are being taken to
keep long-term temporary employees who are diverse as
they are assets to their department?>>Who would like to take that question>>To be clear, you’re saying
long — not contract. You are saying they are
permanent but part-time workers.>>It says long-term temporary
employees. So they are temporary but they have been
here for substantial amount of time with multiple assignments
sometimes. Tep program. Thank you.>>We will follow-up online with
that question.>>The school of medicine has a
fantastic leadership development program. And I was wondering if
there is any thought to creating a similar
program particularly for our
administrative staff who are looking into to getting into leadership role to
capitalize on future leaders for those that are >>I’m going to speak on behalf
of HR. I think Jeff Chu is out of town
or he would be a great person to speak about this. I think that
leadership development programs such as the one that I went
through are open. And to build leaders within the
broad UC community. And I know that human resources
learning and organizational development is retooling their leadership
programs, part of the work that they have
done both out of Gallup poll. Survey
that comes out every year. And strategic initiative to look
at our people in a more broad sense. I’m talking on the health side.
I know the same work is happening on the campus side to be more
thoughtful and deliberate about how we
intake the — from the early stages of leadership all the way
through to the executive level. What our leadership
competencies, for instance, is one area that is being currently
worked on and defined and wrapping around that leadership
programs. in the school of medicine. We
are looking forward to learning and building on that. There is actually a lot of
preliminary planning to have a very
definitive road map for individuals who want to
move through the — up the
organization with >>I’m reading another of our
e-mail questions. Much of what has been discussed has been about ethnic, racial and
gender diversity. What is being done to uplift
faculty and opportunities with disabilities including chronic
mental illness?>>Hi, so I did speak to the
fact that we have with the work of campus committee on
disabilities, we have been working around creating an
accessibility officers. A resource director around accessibility so that he we can
be more intentional. We have recruiters that goes to recruitment fairs and
outreaching students with stabilit
disabilities to put them in our workforce. And making that a
resource for our >>Hello, (Indiscernible). This
question is from online. Considering the lack of or very
low numbers of underrepresented groups in leadership, has campus
considered any intentional or more targeted
ways to support upward mobility? I think that this conversation
of being much more intentional on
how we, you know, readdress the
recruitment component of it which is an
important piece, within that is also what
we tried to embed in our recommendations
is work around mentoring and leadership
development so that there is this path of upward mobility. So that’s one piece of what we
hope to — we hope to shepherd this as
we implement a policy and as we
continue to execute against this work. again, I’m going to point to the
work that human resources and learning organizations is doing. Because we have had pockets and
— of opportunity to learn, grow and
develop, but we have not necessarily been
intentional in looking at talent management as a strategy. And then, you know, what does
that look like and succession planning. I think this is all
work that is in planning stages and there is a
lot of talent within the human resources team that is looking
at that so that it can >>We have time for one more
question? My name is Natalie. I am vice chair of black caucus
at UCSF. I want to thank the panel and everyone to be here. I’m inspired with work you are
doing. As a leader working in our
university, I know notice there is funding
for Watson scholars. I want to know has thought been
put towards developing something similar for staff? Because amount of work it takes
to produce an RCO is extreme. Goes
beyond my 9:00 to 5:00 and many of those RCO leaders here today. I would like to know if can be
done to supplement that work for staff leaders?>>Thank you for your question. And, yes, we recognize the
incredibly value contributions that staff
and staff leaders are making to move the institution forward.
We are looking at an opportunity to perhaps provide stipends for
that work. So that is ongoing now. And hopefully we will have
more information for you soon. [applause]>>On the health side, we are launching a pilot to look for
emerging — to give opportunities to
emerging leaders to have a fellowship
program — so that they can — I don’t know how many of you are aware of the
fellowship program where we look for applicants outside of the
university. We bring them in and give them a two-year
fellowship program and they typically will stay. We are piloting a program that
is similar, but it’s for internal
he he emerging leaders. Two options. One is full year emergent
program that we will backfill. We will fund the person to come
in and have one year fellowship in administration and take on
number of projects and be mentored. And then there is
also a project opportunity fellowship program where it’s about 20% of somebody’s
time to come in and manage a project, be mentored, learned, be guided and
have exposure to executives and
executive leadership. So we are trying that out. I know that
there has been interest on the campus side to participate. So
we are looking to see, you know, who applies and then we will
look at what the scaling opportunity is. We are excited
about it. We will — next year, we will be
here.>>Please join me in thanking
all of our panelists and
facilitators for outstanding contributions. Thank you very
much. I want to take a couple of minutes. We want to thank our
interpreters for being here and providing interpretation. Thank
you to both of you who streamed with us. To a han dra and chief of staff
for making it all happen. Can all of the member of office
of diversity outreach stand and be
acknowledged. I have most amazing team at UCSF. We thank
you so much. (Indiscernible) leadership team. It takes all
of us. It takes a village and takes all of our collective efforts for us to
move the needle forward. I thank you for your engagement
and work that you are going to do and have been doing day in and day out to
move us where we want to be as an
equitable organization. Pick up your T-shirts at the back. We
are building futures at UCSF. Those are T-shirts out there for
everyone. Please take one. Thank you so much for being
here.

Danny Hutson

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